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Gonna buy a bike for a big guy

Old 09-28-17, 05:12 AM
  #1  
TexN
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Gonna buy a bike for a big guy

I am looking to buy a bike for a big guy. 275 lbs I'm 6'2" and my Jean are 32" long. Looking to ride around my neighborhood mostly and probably some mild of road trails. I'm gonna be riding for the exercise just don't want to buy a bike and tear it up to quick. Looking to spend $200_300 . Anybody have any suggestions? I've had some people say I need at least 29" rims but it's hard to find a bike on the shelf with that big of tires. I've considered a schwinn side winder. Anyway thank you.
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Old 09-28-17, 06:48 AM
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Originally Posted by TexN View Post
I am looking to buy a bike for a big guy. 275 lbs I'm 6'2" and my Jean are 32" long. Looking to ride around my neighborhood mostly and probably some mild of road trails. I'm gonna be riding for the exercise just don't want to buy a bike and tear it up to quick. Looking to spend $200_300 . Anybody have any suggestions? I've had some people say I need at least 29" rims but it's hard to find a bike on the shelf with that big of tires. I've considered a schwinn side winder. Anyway thank you.
At that price i would look for an older rigid mountainbike. They are extremely common still all across the country and are built to support you and the riding style you mention.
You can put new tires on that will feel good and be smooth for around the neighborhood, and those will almost for sure work fine on the 'mild off road trails' you mention.

Rigid mountainbike = no suspension. You dont need suspension for what you want and ANY suspension fork on a new bike in your price range will be heavy and low end. A rigid fork will be lighter and handle what you are looking to do.

There are hundreds of models from the 80s into 90s to choose from, so looking for a specific used model isnt necessary.
Instead- focus on frame size and condition. So 19"(if thats your frame size...look it up on a bike size calculator) for example and then look at whats available in that size. Look for one that has been refurbished, or for one that hasnt been refurbished but is in good working order.
You can get these bikes for $50-200 depending on condition and location. Shops will do a full overhaul for $75-150 depending on the shop.


Trek 800 series(820, 850, etc), Specialized HardRock, Diamondback, etc etc are all really common brands and models found across the country.
If you post up your location, some may search to help the chances of finding a bike.

At $200, anything new is going to be a bike thats not meant to be used for years and years.
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Old 09-28-17, 09:30 AM
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My advice to you is first choose the type of bike you want to buy: a road bike, comfort\city bike, or mountain bike? Each serves a different purpose, and each has it's own posture it offers the rider. I'd recommend an upright city/comfort bike, where your posture will be more upright, your back being more or less straight, rather than hunched forward on a road or mountain style bike. The more comfortable you are, the more miles you'll feel like doing on the trail. I'd also recommend investing in a nice Brooks saddle with springs. Your saddle is the most important part of the bike, its your main connection to it, and you cant beat the comfort of a sprung brooks saddle. The bike I bought that really got me back into cycling was a Trek Allant, google that to see what I mean by a city bike/comfort bike. Good luck!!!!
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Old 09-28-17, 12:03 PM
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If you have no objection going used, I'd second the rigid mountain bike from the 80s-90s. I just picked one up as a grocery getter (replaced Trek FX I gave my dad).

You really need to dial in your size though. I am also 6'2" and prefer XL or 21"-22" due to a long torso.
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Old 09-29-17, 10:00 AM
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You'll want 36 spoke wheels for the strength. Rigid MTB. I modded one for a friend and used 105 ga. spokes.

Also, there's a big difference between a big guy who "rides light" and one who just sits there and mashes the pedals. Lifting your weight off the seat for bumps, chuckholes, rocks, etc,. and letting the bike move under you will make it last longer.
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Old 09-29-17, 10:57 AM
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thoughts of this one

Trek Marlin Mountain Bike
23 Inch Frame (measured center to top)
24 Speed: SRAM 4X rear deraileur; Shimano front derailleur
29 inch wheels
disc brakes
active suspension front fork with lock out ability
If you over 6 feet tall, this frame will fit you. It will keep your knees far away from your elbows.




I'm 6' 2"
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Old 09-29-17, 11:05 AM
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Lennard Zinn specializes in making custom bikes for big people.. company is in Colorado.
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Old 09-29-17, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by TexN View Post
Trek Marlin Mountain Bike
23 Inch Frame (measured center to top)
You will probably want the 19.5" or 21.5" over the 23". You need to test both to see which you prefer. I assume you are looking at a used ad.
Trek Sizing Chart

Also, the fork on the bike I'd be most concerned about. Research cheap forks on bikes.
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Old 09-29-17, 02:56 PM
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Wouldn't 26" wheels inherently be stronger than 29" wheels?
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Old 09-29-17, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by dksix View Post
Wouldn't 26" wheels inherently be stronger than 29" wheels?
20" wheels are stronger yet, particularly if staying with 32 spokes... (I have a set on my Bike Friday..)
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Old 09-29-17, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by TexN View Post
Trek Marlin Mountain Bike
23 Inch Frame (measured center to top)
24 Speed: SRAM 4X rear deraileur; Shimano front derailleur
29 inch wheels
disc brakes
active suspension front fork with lock out ability
If you over 6 feet tall, this frame will fit you. It will keep your knees far away from your elbows.




I'm 6' 2"
I'm 6'3" with a 35" riders inseam. I riding a modern geometry MTB with a frame size of 20" but my old MTB is a 24", except for stand over they are about the same size. My point is that just the number used to size a frame is really a horrible reference for what size you need.
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Old 09-29-17, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
20" wheels are stronger yet, particularly if staying with 32 spokes... (I have a set on my Bike Friday..)
It's not likely there will be any bikes the OP is considering with 20" options.
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Old 09-30-17, 10:40 PM
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Be sure and checkout Craigslist. Sometimes there are some great buys.
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Old 10-01-17, 03:14 AM
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buy something with good wheels and tires. i had many punctures, and rims on cheap bikes caused by cobblestones, curbd, rails....

with better wheels i had no problems, even using the bike with a friend on the rear rack.
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Old 10-01-17, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Lennard Zinn specializes in making custom bikes for big people.. company is in Colorado.
Probably a smidge over the $200-300 budget the op clearly states.
It takes skill to post so much without being of assistance.
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