Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Cyclocross bike for road or townie bike

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Cyclocross bike for road or townie bike

Old 10-07-17, 05:07 AM
  #1  
Lakerat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 460
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 202 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Cyclocross bike for road or townie bike

My son lives in a medium size college town and told me of friends who ride cyclocross bikes for road commuter bikes, and was wondering what makes them suitable for this. They are close to a crushed gravel rails to trails path and might ride on that also. Why would a cyclocross bike be any better than an endurance road bike or a touring bike for this use?
Lakerat is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 05:26 AM
  #2  
Garfield Cat
Senior Member
 
Garfield Cat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
Posts: 6,913

Bikes: Cervelo Prodigy

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 388 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 27 Times in 19 Posts
Sounds like a gravel bike would be better than an endurance road bike or touring bike.

Here's what one writer says:

In their purest form cyclocross bikes have a very narrow purpose and that leads to very specific frame design and features. They’re brilliant for cyclocross racing but limited as all-rounders by their lack of provision for mudguards and racks, their relatively narrow gear ranges and inability to take very fat tyres.

For many, the riding position of a pure cyclocross race bike will be too aggressive; fine for an hour and a lap exploring the upper limits of your aerobic range, less ideal for a full day exploring lanes and trails.

Gravel/adventure bikes take ideas from cyclocross bikes and throw in fatter tyres rom mountain bikes and hybrids, wider gear ranges from touring bikes and all-day riding positions from sportive bikes. The details of the mix vary between manufacturers, but they’re clearly a new, distinctly separate breed.

If you fancy expanding your riding to include dirt roads and trails, but want to get there on the road, the good news is you have plenty of choice. Think about the riding position you prefer, how you’re going to carry luggage — if at all — and the gears you need and take it all into account when you make your choice.

Cyclocross bikes v gravel/adventure bikes: what's the difference? | road.cc
Garfield Cat is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 06:08 AM
  #3  
gregf83 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 8,988
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1051 Post(s)
Liked 174 Times in 104 Posts
Bike manufacturers love to narrowly define bicycles resulting in the need for half a dozen bikes to cover all the riding one might encounter. The reality is most bikes are suitable for multiple purposes. Cyclocross bikes have been around for a long time, so you can get decent used models, they accept wider tires and often come with rack/fender mounts. They’re an excellent choice for commuting to college.
gregf83 is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 06:13 AM
  #4  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 24,524
Mentioned: 195 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11472 Post(s)
Liked 930 Times in 722 Posts
I do most of my riding on road bikes... racing? And they're just fine around town. So, I can't imagine a cyclocross bike would be that much different.

A lot of people like the wider tires for commuters, so you should be able to use a wide variety of tires on a cyclocross bike. Plus the wheels should be a little tougher than the road bikes.

Perhaps it depends a bit on the bike choice. Something like a Tricross or Crossrip would be a pretty durable all-around bike.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 07:05 AM
  #5  
RonH
Life is good
 
RonH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Not far from the Withlacoochee Trail. 🚴🏻
Posts: 18,211

Bikes: 2018 Lynskey Helix Pro

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 522 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
I rode a CX bike as my commuter bike. Its great for crappy roads and streets.
__________________
The Lord is merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love. - Psalm 103:8

I am a cyclist. I am not the fastest or the fittest. But I will get to where I'm going with a smile on my face.
RonH is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 07:40 AM
  #6  
mcours2006
Senior Member
 
mcours2006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Toronto, CANADA
Posts: 5,932

Bikes: Giant Rapid, Bianchi Advantage, Specialized Roubaix, 1985 Gardin Quatro, Norco Threshold, Raleigh Serengheti MTB

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1885 Post(s)
Liked 188 Times in 110 Posts
I've ridden my road bike with 25 mm tires on crushed gravel trails without issues, but those same tires on large pebble-sized gravel or larger might not be ideal. CX bikes allow for large tires, which would work well for that. A CX bike with good rolling 32-35 mm tires and fenders would be a great all weather, do-it-all bike bike.
mcours2006 is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 08:15 AM
  #7  
woodcraft
Senior Member
 
woodcraft's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Nor Cal
Posts: 5,143
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1416 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 427 Times in 261 Posts
Originally Posted by Lakerat View Post
My son lives in a medium size college town and told me of friends who ride cyclocross bikes for road commuter bikes, and was wondering what makes them suitable for this. They are close to a crushed gravel rails to trails path and might ride on that also. Why would a cyclocross bike be any better than an endurance road bike or a touring bike for this use?

Larger tires need to be pumped up less often and less likely to flat.

Less expensive bike is more lock-able and more scratch-able.

Mtn pedals for utility shoes.

Less bar drop better for around town.
woodcraft is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 08:16 AM
  #8  
Doug64
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Posts: 5,804
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 884 Post(s)
Liked 196 Times in 127 Posts
I have a Bianchi Volpe which is advertised as a CX bike. I use it for everything, including fully loaded touring.

I have 2 road bikes that hardly ever get ridden, because I prefer to ride the Volpe. I also have 2 other nice touring bikes (Surly Long Haul Trucker and Cannondale T2) that only get used for special types of tours, because I prefer to use the Volpe.

My wife and I are currently going into the last week of a 6 week self supported tour, and I'm riding the Volpe

However, it is not a stock bike. The only original parts left of my 2007 bike are the stem, shifters, and bars; everything else including the frame, was replaced. The frame was replaced with a 2013 Bianchi frame. The fork was also replaced with one that has an uncut steerer tube, giving me a less aggressive riding position.

Having said all that, I did ride the original bike across the U.S. just the way it came out of the box, and it did a great job.

It fits like a glove, and the ride is excellent.

Some of the newer CX bikes are pretty specialized, but there are still a few around with eyelets for fenders and racks, and are comfortable to ride.

Last edited by Doug64; 10-07-17 at 12:03 PM.
Doug64 is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 08:31 AM
  #9  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 42,522

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 194 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7314 Post(s)
Liked 903 Times in 572 Posts
The Sub top end* Cyclo Cross , IE not race bikes for that Riding and Running competition are practical bikes, with a medium width

700c wheel.. hybrid with drop bars..

* they have fittings for adding racks, mudguards, water bottles , lights, etc..

now commonly fitted with disc brakes..


Remember: College campuses are bike thieves paradise, lots of bikes in one place, many poorly locked up.





....

Last edited by fietsbob; 10-07-17 at 12:29 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 08:57 AM
  #10  
PortlandEddie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Portland,OR
Posts: 101

Bikes: Fuji cross

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have CX (Fuji) and i ride 2/3 times to work. The reason i love my Cx for daily commute is i can ride on the road like normal "Rodies" or if i see a park or gravel trail i can jump on that and cut across it. Is it the best for roads no, BUT if you get a great tire that does all of that! your kid will be just fine. I think touring would be too much you don't need the shocks and 42 fat tires. Hope the helps.
PortlandEddie is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 10:05 AM
  #11  
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Posts: 12,948
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Modern cx bikes seem to be salami sliced by marketeers into cx race, gravel, adventure, etc etc. A doitall cx bike equipped with rack and fender eyelets is good for almost everything. Disk brakes are a useful modern option but ensure that the rear brake is mounted to the horizontal chainstay so it can play well with rack and fenders.
This style of bike is more practical than a road bike, more agile than most touring bikes and lighter and sportier than most hybrid and mtb bikes.
I like to think of them as bicycles rather than a specific type of bike becsuse they can do everything well enough.
MichaelW is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 10:11 AM
  #12  
gregf83 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 8,988
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1051 Post(s)
Liked 174 Times in 104 Posts
Mine gets used in all four seasons:
gregf83 is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 12:14 PM
  #13  
Lakerat
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 460
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 202 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
gregf83- What's the orange donut in the rear wheel?
Lakerat is offline  
Old 10-07-17, 03:38 PM
  #14  
gregf83 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 8,988
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1051 Post(s)
Liked 174 Times in 104 Posts
Originally Posted by Lakerat View Post
gregf83- What's the orange donut in the rear wheel?
It's red and it's a Copenhagen electric wheel(https://content.superpedestrian.com/). Contains a battery and motor for electric assist. I usually throw it on the bike on Thur and Fri for commuting. I have a fairly long commute and need some assistance once in a while
gregf83 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Amy11325
General Cycling Discussion
16
08-21-15 11:54 AM
Barrettscv
Fifty Plus (50+)
59
11-21-13 03:36 PM
TakingMyTime
Road Cycling
54
12-17-12 07:34 AM
nbo10
Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational)
19
07-27-12 01:06 PM
Starwind
Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational)
22
10-12-11 01:30 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.