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Need to buy clothing for my riding needs

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Need to buy clothing for my riding needs

Old 10-16-17, 03:39 AM
  #1  
sabado225
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Need to buy clothing for my riding needs

I have a marmot precip that is a size larger than my XL down Arcteryx coat. I just disovered it has vnets and will test it against the wind and rain in coming weeks

Constraints:
1. I typically don't commute on my bike, and don't ride it in heavy rain or snow due to stupid drivers.
2. Should work well up to ~40 degrees F
3. Should protect from wind especially , but rain would be nice too. I find due to heat loss by convection waterproof stuff during the transition from fall to winter and in the coldest parts of winter are, waterproof matters.


I had a freakout blood pressure from winter exposure and other factors two years ago, no bad things for about a year but always in the back of my head at 28 years old

A few questions:
1. What would be the difference in 'feel' beteween an equivalent marmot precip and event shell?

I am thinking of 1. getting a soft shell for autumn riding and then a seperate hard shell for winter riding after assessing my winter riding needs (blood pressure being careful).

2. Keeping the precip for autumn riding, see how the vents are and then just buying hte hard shell.


So for me it seem slike the hard shell is a necessary purchase and I might buy it first. I am looking at the Goretex active but not many bike jackets use it. i'm also 46 chest, can do 44 on a tight fit but I'm not sure you want a tight fit against cold wind. Also wonder if most goretex bike jackets have pit vents....online descriptions say they do not.


Can go to paragon sports or arcteryx in NYC

Last edited by sabado225; 10-16-17 at 03:49 AM.
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Old 10-16-17, 06:39 AM
  #2  
Coasterbrakefan
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What type of riding will you be doing? (AKA city riding, road, dirt, distance)

Are you planning on laughing in natures face and riding in the snow?

Do you have a dress code requirement you have to follow when your at the destination your heading to?

Also, you have to put into consideration what bike your going to use. If you already have a bike, you might have to change some things depending what kind of bike it is.

However, if one were to be general about what you might need, the most important piece of advice anyone can give you is this.

Layer.

Layer, layer layer! Even in summer it can be cold in the early morning. What materials? Cotton and wool. How you layer is personal preference so you'll have to experiment.

Important features of the clothing?

(1) Ease of removal/applying. This is so as it gets warmer and/or colder throughout the day you can add or remove layers without it being a hassle.

(2) Zippers. This is also helpful for #1, but it will also help you regulate your temperature more easily.

And the list goes on... Bike commuting is a very lengthy subject, and there have been many books written in order to help people accomplish this task with a little more ease. I would highly recommend picking up some of these books at a book store or your library.
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Old 10-16-17, 09:44 AM
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sabado225
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Originally Posted by Coasterbrakefan View Post
What type of riding will you be doing? (AKA city riding, road, dirt, distance)

Are you planning on laughing in natures face and riding in the snow?

Do you have a dress code requirement you have to follow when your at the destination your heading to?

Also, you have to put into consideration what bike your going to use. If you already have a bike, you might have to change some things depending what kind of bike it is.

However, if one were to be general about what you might need, the most important piece of advice anyone can give you is this.

Layer.

Layer, layer layer! Even in summer it can be cold in the early morning. What materials? Cotton and wool. How you layer is personal preference so you'll have to experiment.

Important features of the clothing?

(1) Ease of removal/applying. This is so as it gets warmer and/or colder throughout the day you can add or remove layers without it being a hassle.

(2) Zippers. This is also helpful for #1, but it will also help you regulate your temperature more easily.

And the list goes on... Bike commuting is a very lengthy subject, and there have been many books written in order to help people accomplish this task with a little more ease. I would highly recommend picking up some of these books at a book store or your library.
urban
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Old 10-16-17, 09:49 AM
  #4  
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where do you live?

there are many threads dedicated to this subject but I'll go off of my memory and experience.

you don't need a "heavy coat"

dress in very thin layers, think nylon and polyester. Also, get a good thin base layer of merino wool.

other than that pay close attention to your feet and keeping them warm, as well as your hands and head

with a little trial and error you can dial in exactly what and how many layers you need for different conditions
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Old 10-16-17, 11:02 PM
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A couple of seemingly minor bits and pieces that add up to winter comfort:

Champion brand poly wicking fabric boxer/briefs and t-shirts. These will control perspiration so you don't get chilled -- the fabric wicks moisture away from the body gradually, cooling in summer, warming in winter, without sudden changes. Huge benefit under rain gear.
  • These boxer/briefs -- the semi-mesh fabric pouch makes the difference in support and comfort. I can hardly stand to ride wearing anything else under my baggy shorts or jeans, unless I'm on my road bike wearing tighty spandex shorts.
  • And as good as the Champion double-dry fabric is for long or short sleeves, the powertrain vapor tech X-temp is even better for a few bucks more. Dries quicker while wearing, resists odor more effectively when sweaty, easily the best undershirts I've ever worn. And I've worn undershirts of all kinds for decades in Texas summers too, under dress shirts, to control perspiration. But those older cotton tees can't come close to the better poly wicking fabrics for controlling perspiration and odor, year 'round.

There are other good brands including Under Armor, but Champions are outstanding values.

And disposable surgical masks. I use the types with elastic loops that go behind the ears. Carry two or thee and replace 'em as needed when they get wet from weather, breathing, etc. Makes a big difference in comfort and health by controlling temperature and humidity. I have asthma, have battled bronchitis and pneumonia every winter since childhood, and am very conscious of avoiding respiratory distress. Last winter I was able to ride in 20F winter weather with disposable surgical masks -- no need for fabric balaclavas or similar apparel that must be washed after every use in snotty weather.
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Old 10-17-17, 02:53 AM
  #6  
CliffordK
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I like just two layers.. Down to 25 or 30 degrees F.

Top: Fleece sweater + cycling slicker.
Bottom: Ordinary, jeans. Wet: Rain pants over jeans. I've also experimented with rain pants over tights, and so far, it is WARM.

Whenever it isn't raining, I'm often hot and end up unzipping the jacket. But, if it gets chilly, I'll zip up, and the fleece is generally warm enough.
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Old 10-17-17, 07:14 AM
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I'm cold tolerant, so what I do may or may not work for you, but I just use a technical softshell with an athletic knit t-shirt underneath. I have one from 66 North, and one from Specialized made by 686. Takes care of wind, gives me any insulation I need, and so long as I am not in a downpour is also waterproof. The only thing I sometime add to that is my rain shell, simply for visibility as it is hi-viz green, and the softshells are muted dark tones.

It has to be below 40F for me to even wear that, though, cycling keeps me plenty warm even in winter months.
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Old 10-17-17, 07:34 AM
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Nashbar has some pretty good deals right now on clothing in their 'Bargain Bin' under the "Clearance Zone" tab.

Having said that, I've been pretty involved in clothing specific to hunting. There are a LOT OF CHOICES out there. A few things I've found, cotton is not your friend, and clothing is pretty specific to the person. Some things work for some, some hate the same thing and calls it garbage. There is all manner of good technical clothing available for high level of activity in cold weather. Some are good, some not so. One thing that works is Merino Wool. There are some great base layers out there in Merino. Works for me. Others hate it.

One constant most all agree on(& mentioned above) is multiple thin layers are better than one or two thick layers.

In the end, you'll have to try to find a combination that works for you and meets YOUR needs.
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