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Looking at buying a new frame...

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Looking at buying a new frame...

Old 10-26-17, 09:45 PM
  #1  
Kokiafan
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Looking at buying a new frame...

57 year old.
3000 miles/year
235 pounds
Total Height178 Cm
Actual Inseam73 Cm
Trunk66 Cm
Forearm34 Cm
Arm64 Cm
Thigh62 Cm
Lower Leg50 Cm
Sternal Notch144 Cm

Current bike is 56 cm frame and it is tooo big.
The frame I am looking at has a TT of 530 mm.

Bike components are all ultegra--brakes, derailleurs, crank, everything.

My no name carbon frame from nashbar flexes to the point where I can hit my Ultegra crankarm on the chainstays.
Obviously weak.
Do NOT want to spend a ton of money (already have 2000 in the bike) but the frame is just not the right size for me and I cannot buy components to make it fit--have tried.

So I am looking at getting a new frame.

Given my weight, does it make a ton of sense to stay with Carbon?
Or should I be looking at aluminum?

I do mostly short rides during the week and one longish ride every weekend (30-50 miles) so this is for comfort, not speed.

I am looking at a DengFu R02 frame right now, and can get it for 517 all in. It would be great if I could stay right around this price point.

Thoughts?
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Old 10-27-17, 12:44 PM
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Those number indicate you're mainly trunk and head with relatively very short legs. Are you sure the numbers are correct?
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Old 10-27-17, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by philbob57 View Post
Those number indicate you're mainly trunk and head with relatively very short legs. Are you sure the numbers are correct?
Probably. I am 5'11" and have a 28 inch inseam.

That is basically 5 inches more in the torso than "average".

Humans are weird.
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Old 10-27-17, 01:45 PM
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You state the crank hits the chainstay ?

That's really odd and I can't say I've ever read that as a complaint. Flex in the B-bracket often results in the F derailleur hitting the chain, when on the big ring. I'm a big guy and had that with a Lemond titanium.

Any chance you've got a crack somewhere ?.

As to a frame ?. The Nashbar is essentially a branded Chinese open mold, same as Bikes Direct, Tomasso, and a bunch of others. Thus I'd question if a Dengfu, Hingfu, Flyxii, etc... is going to be any different.
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Old 10-27-17, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by rgconner View Post
Probably. I am 5'11" and have a 28 inch inseam.

That is basically 5 inches more in the torso than "average".

Humans are weird.
I too have short legs and long torso. IMHO- you probably won't find a stock bike that truly fits well.
You need (as I did) a custom frame.
Suggest a Gunnar with custom size option.
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Old 10-27-17, 06:20 PM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by martianone View Post
I too have short legs and long torso. IMHO- you probably won't find a stock bike that truly fits well.
You need (as I did) a custom frame.
Suggest a Gunnar with custom size option.
I have one, the one in my profile is a custom steel frame I have been riding since 2000
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Old 10-27-17, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by rgconner View Post
I have one, the one in my profile is a custom steel frame I have been riding since 2000
Five years now, I have a Roadie with custom geometry. My favorite bike, feels like an extension of my body, can ride it comfortably for hours. Not sure why I didn't get it years before.
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Old 10-27-17, 08:15 PM
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Yah. Short legs, long torso. I thought about the custom frame option but man...what is that gonna cost...
The R02 in 52 cm had a top tube about the right length but the seat tube seemed too long going by my measurements. I was thinking maybe a smaller crank and a longer stem, but that gets me too far forward and I have the opposite problem, too much pressure on the hands.

The frame is in really good shape. Except for the fact that it kinda stinks.

Obviously a custom frame would be my best option if I had that kind of cash.
I live in Flor i duh where you have few hills...but where there are hills, I get the clanky clanks. Even if I lost 15 kilos I would still be a Clydesdale...and still have enough power to force the crank into the 'stays.


What does a custom Al or steel frame run?

Last edited by Kokiafan; 10-27-17 at 08:18 PM.
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Old 10-27-17, 08:49 PM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by martianone View Post
I too have short legs and long torso. IMHO- you probably won't find a stock bike that truly fits well.
You need (as I did) a custom frame.
Suggest a Gunnar with custom size option.
Yah, another 1500 to 2000. Ugh. Uhg.

Maybe my only option will be to get a custom fit to see what the dimensions of frame I need, and then try to find one that works...
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Old 10-27-17, 08:51 PM
  #10  
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Fit Style from, the competitive cyclist site...
Top Tube Length 53.7 - 54.1 Cm
Seat Tube Range CC 48.4 - 49 Cm
Seat Tube Range CT 49.9 - 50.4 Cm
Stem Length 9.8 - 10.4 Cm
BB Saddle Position 61.4 - 63.4 Cm
Saddle Handlebar 52.6 - 53.2 Cm
Saddle Setback 5.9 - 6.3 Cm
Seatpost Type Setback

It is the CC Seat Tube that kills the most, I guess?
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Old 10-28-17, 01:59 AM
  #11  
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I also have to question how you built your bike so that the crank arms hit the chain stays. I'd suggest having someone look at that.

Carbon simply isn't that flexible, and your crank arms shouldn't be flexing at all. If you are getting that much motion in your frame it should crack ... or already has. I'd also look at the BB .... that is simply not a properly operating bicycle if the cranks flex into the chain stays at Any power output.

I am also a Clyde (a mega-clyde, lately ) and have a CF frame .... but I assembled mine properly and it isn't broken, so I don't have any of those problems.

I don't Know your situation, but I would strongly suspect something is much more wrong than a flexy frame---particularly because so many other people have posted here praising that frame, and I have Never, on any website at any time since I got on the internet, heard about the problem you have.

As far as Chinese CF frames go, look for ones with short seat tubes.

Workswell 093--http://www.workswellbikes.com/PRODDUCT/ROAD/Endurance/20170117/12.html

Workswell 085--http://www.workswellbikes.com/PRODDUCT/ROAD/Endurance/20170116/7.html

Also ... I use the Comp Cycle Fit Guide as a Guide. As you know they list three fits (Eddy, French, and Comp, I think?) and their "calculated optimal" but of course they have no idea how you are actually built, how flexible you are or aren't , what riding posture you prefer .....
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Old 10-28-17, 02:30 AM
  #12  
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The custom frame will cost you more in the short term, but it'll last a lot longer because it'll fit and you'll enjoy riding it. All you have to do is look after it and at your age, a looked after steel frame will outlast you.
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Old 10-28-17, 09:24 AM
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A custom frame built by a skilled builder can take in all those factors and design a bike frame just for you
with idealized material choices for your weight and body proportions ..
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Old 10-29-17, 09:02 AM
  #14  
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This is my first carbon frame, had no idea what to expect performance wise. After doing a bunch more reading, have found a couple of people with similar weight and power output are happy with the velobuild vb-r-022. The frame I got would be called a 56 (TT) and the VB-R-022 I am looking at is a 52 on their site.
Problem is, this frame it is only 4 cm or so shorter in the top tube.
Right now, I feel like I am fully squatting on my butt and can barely reach the brake hoods. If I move my seat forward it screws up the positioning of my knees.
Will a <4cm change give me the balance I need? Or should I take the 52 out of the cart and replace it with the 49, and find a stem that fixes the difference?
Ugh.
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Old 10-29-17, 09:46 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by Kokiafan View Post
This is my first carbon frame, had no idea what to expect performance wise. After doing a bunch more reading, have found a couple of people with similar weight and power output are happy with the velobuild vb-r-022. The frame I got would be called a 56 (TT) and the VB-R-022 I am looking at is a 52 on their site.
Problem is, this frame it is only 4 cm or so shorter in the top tube.
Right now, I feel like I am fully squatting on my butt and can barely reach the brake hoods. If I move my seat forward it screws up the positioning of my knees.
Will a <4cm change give me the balance I need? Or should I take the 52 out of the cart and replace it with the 49, and find a stem that fixes the difference?
Ugh.
Instead of asking all this here, for what is obviously a struggle to determine what's going to work, why not head to a good LBS where they can fit you to the correct frame ?. If you pay up for a fit, you'll know what to buy. You can then buy whatever you want, Chinese, mail order, or from the LBS. Who knows they might actually have a bike you'll like at a decent price. Stranger things have happened.
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Old 10-29-17, 11:59 AM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
Instead of asking all this here, for what is obviously a struggle to determine what's going to work, why not head to a good LBS where they can fit you to the correct frame ?. If you pay up for a fit, you'll know what to buy. You can then buy whatever you want, Chinese, mail order, or from the LBS. Who knows they might actually have a bike you'll like at a decent price. Stranger things have happened.
You are correct, sir.
But it is complicated.

I sent email messages to two LBS on Wednesday.
One replied back and said that they do not do fittings for people looking to build their own bikes.
One never replied back at all.

I have a further issue where I make 75 bucks an hour as a contractor, do not get paid if I do not work, in an office that runs 9-6. Guess when the real LBS's are open? So a 100$ fitting could easily be a 250$ fitting.

I live in south florida where most of the "LBS's" are now owned by one person, the people working in those shops are minimum wage teenagers who wouldn't know standover hight from a watermelon, and the ONE real LBS right by my house, with dedicated long term professionals, closed because the owner was insane... I continue my search.

You can't fault someone for trying all avenues in a search for knowledge?
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Old 10-29-17, 12:43 PM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by Kokiafan View Post
You are correct, sir.


You can't fault someone for trying all avenues in a search for knowledge?
Nope, not all all and good reasons for the route you are taking.

FWIW, I’m the same weight, maybe an inch taller and ride a 56 effective TT bike. I too have short legs and long torso, thus and after 28 years of riding 54, 55, 56 and 57 ETT bikes, found a 56 with a 100mm stem fits me well, but like to be stretched out.

ETT is really the crucial measurement as you kind of need to get that into the correct range. The seat tube length matters a lot less as it’s completely dependent on the angle of the top tube and you get a lot of range adjustability in the seat post. You get less adjustability, but some, by switching stem lengths as too long or too short affects handling.

Thus I could see that the CC measurement might be correct. As note, going the Chinese route is only a $400-$500 for the frame, plus price of cables, tape, etc... ($100), so not a killer if slightly off

As well, look at Flyxii frames, I’ve been super happy with mine, 2500 miles later. They sell frames with BSA bottom brackets, which are easy to deal with if doing a home buildup

Last edited by Steve B.; 10-29-17 at 12:51 PM.
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Old 10-29-17, 05:46 PM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by Kokiafan View Post
The R02 in 52 cm had a top tube about the right length but the seat tube seemed too long going by my measurements.
By Your measurements ... or by the measurements of the algorithm on some website?

First Principle: It is ALL about Contact Points.

Where you touch the bike ... the spatial relationship of those points---is “fit.”

If it were my bike ... I would flip the handlebars upside down so I could reach them easily sitting bolt upright. I would prop up the bike against something--I usually work in my garage and lean on the washer/dryer---and I would find out my correct seat position.

Seat position is Independent of the handlebars. The two are not related At All.

You might use KOPS ( knee over pedal spindle) as a loose starting guideline, but what you need is a slight bend in the knee at full extension (which is not the same as the bottom of the stroke.)

You can play with moving the saddle a little forward and back until you find a spot where you can sit on the meat of the saddle and your legs are extended to the degree you find comfortable through the whole pedal stroke.

Once on the road you will probably make millimeter adjustments to this, but there is only one anatomically correct and optimal saddle/bottom-bracket position for each person (unless you change crank length.)

The human body is adaptable. You don't need to be micrometer-precise ... but you should start every bike fitting by getting the seat in generally the right place so that you can pedal with a combination of the greatest power, comfort, and efficiency.

You might need to make tiny fore-and-aft adjustments and almost certainly slight angle adjustments depending on how long and low you like to sit .... but until you know where the saddle goes, you have nothing.

Best part is ... you can find that measurement on your existing bike. That's why I suggested flipping the bars up---so you can reach them without leaning. Obviously you won't leave them flipped up ... but if you are trying to find the proper seat position but are compromised by too long a stem or top tube or too big a bar drop, you will never get the saddle right.

Once you know where the saddle goes, you can measure from the center of the bottom bracket to the intersection of the seat tube extended virtually through the top of the saddle, or the bottom pedal at furthest extension to the top of the saddle where the seat tube intersects, or any similar measurement so long as you know exactly what you measured.

Figure a saddle from rails to top is max two inches, figure minimum one inch exposed seat post, which is just enough for adjustment .... and now you know exactly how long a seat tube you can manage.

When you read geometry charts, be careful. A lot of bikes list a sort of virtual seat tube length---the intersection of the extended seat tube measured to the center of the head tube on a line parallel with the ground----while their actual seat tube is much shorter.

If you check outhte geometry on this WW 093 (WCB-R-093 Normal V brake-workswellbikes) you will see it has a 530-mm seat tube because of the sloping top tube,

Also check out the geometry on this Fuji Sportif: (https://www.performancebike.com/bike...&storeId=10052) Notice it lists and "Effective Seat Tube" of 560 mm for the 56 frame. The actual seat tube is like 520 mm.

You need to watch that---you might be misreading geometry charts and ruling out bikes that fit.

In any case---you need to figure out what range of seat tube lengths suit you instead of looking at 49-cm frames and such.

Not to say you might not fit best on a frame people tell you won’t fit. I have an old bike with a 50-cm frame, a foot of exposed seat post, two inches of spacers, a 120-mm, 17-degree up-angled stem, and it is Supremely comfortable, even though I nominally ride a 56. Still, it is better to know what Actually works for you rather than trying to make a mis-sized frame fit with accessories (as you have learned.)

While we are on the subject of measurements ..... Once you get your saddle where it belongs, play around with the handlebars to try to find a posture where you feel comfortable. It doesn’t matter if the bars are twisted ant some weird angle---you just want to use them as a support so you can lean forward and find a comfortable body angle.

Then you can hold yourself up with one hand on the misplaced bars and find where your other hand drops naturally----find where, with your body at a comfortable angle and a reasonable bend/extension, your hand would naturally fall on the hoods or bar tops if the bars were in the right place.

With a tape measure and a little guessing you can figure out where the bars would need to be approximately, and can then start thinking about stem length, stem angle, top tube length, spacer stack height, and bar reach and drop.

You don’t need to pay a possible untrained and semi-ignorant “pro” a couple hours' wages to figure this stuff out. You know your body, the degree of flexibility you find comfortable, the riding position you prefer. Learn a tiny bit about basic bike fitting and then dial it in as you ride.

On top of that, your fit will change as your fitness changes. Pay a pro $100 today and come Spring, after not riding as much, the bike won’t fit. By September, your Spring fit won’t work.

Bike fits are great for competitive riders who want to max power and comfort over a couple hours at racing output. Most of us aren’t operating that close to our limits.

Your best bet by far is to find out as closely as possible what actual frame dimensions You need. Then learn to read geometry charts---especially the geometry chart of the bike you already own---so you can corroborate your measurements---see where a couple extra or a couple fewer centimeters might make all the difference.

I have one of the weirdest human bodies genetics errors has ever produced---I am sort of a basketball on stilts. Long, long limbs, almost no torso, and no torso flexibility. I Had to learn to fit myself because everyone I talked to wanted to stick me on a bike based on my overall height and then move stuff, and it just doesn’t work. (So much for the “knowledgeable pros.)

I found that once I had everything broken down, I could figure out how to make some commercially available frames work for me, and I have quite a few comfortable bikes now.

By the way ... if you want a custom frame you are going to have to know how you want it to fit. The frame builder can measure everything, but he can’t really tell how your body feels on a certain frame. Before you even consider paying big bucks for a custom frame which might be worse than what you have ... really figure out what you want.

One thing you might consider ... it is a little costly but not ridiculous .... is to buy a really cheap, beat up used bike in Approximately your size, and get a bunch of spacers and a few $15 stems off EBay ... and set up the bike to actually Fit, even if it is so crapped out you cannot even ride it. Figure $45 for the crap bike, $65 for stems and spacers (you wouldn’t buy stems until you have a good idea of what you need so a couple in a couple lengths and angles would be plenty---an alternative would be to buy an adjustable-angle stem in a couple lengths.)

It wouldn’t matter if the resulting bike wasn’t safe to ride. All you would use it for would be to take measurement to your contact points.

If I were you I would put an “X” in tape or marker on the top of the saddle where the extended seat tube would pierce the top of the saddle. I would measure the total distance, and also length and drop to the bars---to the tops, to the hood, to the drops. (It helps if you have a carpenter's bubble level, but you can work around that.) I would measure from the X to the center of the bars.

I would measure from the X to the center of the BB. I would drop a plumb line (a string with a couple washers) to get saddle setback--how far is the X behind the bottom bracket.

If you have the right relationship, even if it means using three inches of spacers (unsafe unless you have a steel steerer) or a 150 mm or a 50 mm stem, it doesn’t matter. All you need is to plot the contact points in space. Then you can look at commercially available frames and see which ones would connect those points with a reasonable spacer stack, stem length, stem angle, and seat post exposure.

Once you know those relationships, you can recreate them on any bike, too.

Put the “pros” out of business (it sound like they are doing it to themselves already ... or driving themselves crazy ) Do your own fitting, which---because it is for you---you will do with much greater care and precision than Most of the people in a bike shop who have one eye on the clock and half their brain calculating their commissions if they can sell you a bike which might not fit.

Also ... ignore the people here who will try to tell you it is impossible to fit yourself to a bike. This is a flat lie.

If I were a competitive rider looking for that last percent of power and efficiency, I would pay $300 for a few hours with video cameras and lasers, and get the half-millimeter shim under one cleat and what not.

As a recreational rider who just want to be comfortable riding a metric century or a century at a leisurely pace, I am Well able to set up my bike properly.

So are you.

Last edited by Maelochs; 10-29-17 at 05:56 PM.
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Old 10-30-17, 07:40 PM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
By Your measurements ... or by the measurements of the algorithm on some website?

First Principle: It is ALL about Contact Points.

Where you touch the bike ... the spatial relationship of those points---is “fit.”

If it were my bike ... I would flip the handlebars upside down so I could reach them easily sitting bolt upright. I would prop up the bike against something--I usually work in my garage and lean on the washer/dryer---and I would find out my correct seat position.

Seat position is Independent of the handlebars. The two are not related At All.

You might use KOPS ( knee over pedal spindle) as a loose starting guideline, but what you need is a slight bend in the knee at full extension (which is not the same as the bottom of the stroke.)

You can play with moving the saddle a little forward and back until you find a spot where you can sit on the meat of the saddle and your legs are extended to the degree you find comfortable through the whole pedal stroke.

Once on the road you will probably make millimeter adjustments to this, but there is only one anatomically correct and optimal saddle/bottom-bracket position for each person (unless you change crank length.)

The human body is adaptable. You don't need to be micrometer-precise ... but you should start every bike fitting by getting the seat in generally the right place so that you can pedal with a combination of the greatest power, comfort, and efficiency.

You might need to make tiny fore-and-aft adjustments and almost certainly slight angle adjustments depending on how long and low you like to sit .... but until you know where the saddle goes, you have nothing.

Best part is ... you can find that measurement on your existing bike. That's why I suggested flipping the bars up---so you can reach them without leaning. Obviously you won't leave them flipped up ... but if you are trying to find the proper seat position but are compromised by too long a stem or top tube or too big a bar drop, you will never get the saddle right.

Once you know where the saddle goes, you can measure from the center of the bottom bracket to the intersection of the seat tube extended virtually through the top of the saddle, or the bottom pedal at furthest extension to the top of the saddle where the seat tube intersects, or any similar measurement so long as you know exactly what you measured.

Figure a saddle from rails to top is max two inches, figure minimum one inch exposed seat post, which is just enough for adjustment .... and now you know exactly how long a seat tube you can manage.

When you read geometry charts, be careful. A lot of bikes list a sort of virtual seat tube length---the intersection of the extended seat tube measured to the center of the head tube on a line parallel with the ground----while their actual seat tube is much shorter.

If you check outhte geometry on this WW 093 (WCB-R-093 Normal V brake-workswellbikes) you will see it has a 530-mm seat tube because of the sloping top tube,

Also check out the geometry on this Fuji Sportif: (https://www.performancebike.com/bike...&storeId=10052) Notice it lists and "Effective Seat Tube" of 560 mm for the 56 frame. The actual seat tube is like 520 mm.

You need to watch that---you might be misreading geometry charts and ruling out bikes that fit.

In any case---you need to figure out what range of seat tube lengths suit you instead of looking at 49-cm frames and such.

Not to say you might not fit best on a frame people tell you won’t fit. I have an old bike with a 50-cm frame, a foot of exposed seat post, two inches of spacers, a 120-mm, 17-degree up-angled stem, and it is Supremely comfortable, even though I nominally ride a 56. Still, it is better to know what Actually works for you rather than trying to make a mis-sized frame fit with accessories (as you have learned.)

While we are on the subject of measurements ..... Once you get your saddle where it belongs, play around with the handlebars to try to find a posture where you feel comfortable. It doesn’t matter if the bars are twisted ant some weird angle---you just want to use them as a support so you can lean forward and find a comfortable body angle.

Then you can hold yourself up with one hand on the misplaced bars and find where your other hand drops naturally----find where, with your body at a comfortable angle and a reasonable bend/extension, your hand would naturally fall on the hoods or bar tops if the bars were in the right place.

With a tape measure and a little guessing you can figure out where the bars would need to be approximately, and can then start thinking about stem length, stem angle, top tube length, spacer stack height, and bar reach and drop.

You don’t need to pay a possible untrained and semi-ignorant “pro” a couple hours' wages to figure this stuff out. You know your body, the degree of flexibility you find comfortable, the riding position you prefer. Learn a tiny bit about basic bike fitting and then dial it in as you ride.

On top of that, your fit will change as your fitness changes. Pay a pro $100 today and come Spring, after not riding as much, the bike won’t fit. By September, your Spring fit won’t work.

Bike fits are great for competitive riders who want to max power and comfort over a couple hours at racing output. Most of us aren’t operating that close to our limits.

Your best bet by far is to find out as closely as possible what actual frame dimensions You need. Then learn to read geometry charts---especially the geometry chart of the bike you already own---so you can corroborate your measurements---see where a couple extra or a couple fewer centimeters might make all the difference.

I have one of the weirdest human bodies genetics errors has ever produced---I am sort of a basketball on stilts. Long, long limbs, almost no torso, and no torso flexibility. I Had to learn to fit myself because everyone I talked to wanted to stick me on a bike based on my overall height and then move stuff, and it just doesn’t work. (So much for the “knowledgeable pros.)

I found that once I had everything broken down, I could figure out how to make some commercially available frames work for me, and I have quite a few comfortable bikes now.

By the way ... if you want a custom frame you are going to have to know how you want it to fit. The frame builder can measure everything, but he can’t really tell how your body feels on a certain frame. Before you even consider paying big bucks for a custom frame which might be worse than what you have ... really figure out what you want.

One thing you might consider ... it is a little costly but not ridiculous .... is to buy a really cheap, beat up used bike in Approximately your size, and get a bunch of spacers and a few $15 stems off EBay ... and set up the bike to actually Fit, even if it is so crapped out you cannot even ride it. Figure $45 for the crap bike, $65 for stems and spacers (you wouldn’t buy stems until you have a good idea of what you need so a couple in a couple lengths and angles would be plenty---an alternative would be to buy an adjustable-angle stem in a couple lengths.)

It wouldn’t matter if the resulting bike wasn’t safe to ride. All you would use it for would be to take measurement to your contact points.

If I were you I would put an “X” in tape or marker on the top of the saddle where the extended seat tube would pierce the top of the saddle. I would measure the total distance, and also length and drop to the bars---to the tops, to the hood, to the drops. (It helps if you have a carpenter's bubble level, but you can work around that.) I would measure from the X to the center of the bars.

I would measure from the X to the center of the BB. I would drop a plumb line (a string with a couple washers) to get saddle setback--how far is the X behind the bottom bracket.

If you have the right relationship, even if it means using three inches of spacers (unsafe unless you have a steel steerer) or a 150 mm or a 50 mm stem, it doesn’t matter. All you need is to plot the contact points in space. Then you can look at commercially available frames and see which ones would connect those points with a reasonable spacer stack, stem length, stem angle, and seat post exposure.

Once you know those relationships, you can recreate them on any bike, too.

Put the “pros” out of business (it sound like they are doing it to themselves already ... or driving themselves crazy ) Do your own fitting, which---because it is for you---you will do with much greater care and precision than Most of the people in a bike shop who have one eye on the clock and half their brain calculating their commissions if they can sell you a bike which might not fit.

Also ... ignore the people here who will try to tell you it is impossible to fit yourself to a bike. This is a flat lie.

If I were a competitive rider looking for that last percent of power and efficiency, I would pay $300 for a few hours with video cameras and lasers, and get the half-millimeter shim under one cleat and what not.

As a recreational rider who just want to be comfortable riding a metric century or a century at a leisurely pace, I am Well able to set up my bike properly.

So are you.
Thanks for the extremely detailed reply. I have my seat dialed in really well already. Took pictures and video to see how everything is working IRL and I am having no knee issues at all. No hip swivel either. If I leave the seat where it is I can barely reach the brake hood. Arms completely extended even with the bars turned up slightly on a 60mm stem. So I know the damn tt is too long. Locking my elbows for more than a few moments brings numbness. So I am constantly changing position. I can't move the seat far enough forward without my balance and my joints suffering.
Screw it. Just put the damn thing back on the rack in my office. Damn expensive decoration.
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Old 11-04-17, 04:18 AM
  #20  
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carbon fiber bikes have their place, lightweight and stiff, but modern sizing in the industry can make it frustrTinv to those who don't fit the norm. Classic American and British bikes have longer top tubes and shorter seat tubes to match their demographics...northern europeans generally have short legs and long torsos to protect from the elements.
Lemond and serotta fit your ideal. My sarthe has a 53 seat tube and a 55 top tube...look for classic steel. My sarthe was built with true temper and rides nice and stiff, for me...I'm a very strong 185lbs.
P_20170914_102305.jpg
good luck in your quest regardless.
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Old 11-04-17, 08:55 AM
  #21  
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What's your budget?

If I were doing that today I wouldn't compromise. I'd call Jeff Gerhardt at FeCycles to build a custom frame for me. I have no idea about cost or time required but it sounds like you already have a bike to ride in the interim so you might as well get EXACTLY what you want.
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Old 11-04-17, 09:02 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by Kokiafan View Post
You are correct, sir.
But it is complicated.

I sent email messages to two LBS on Wednesday.
One replied back and said that they do not do fittings for people looking to build their own bikes.
One never replied back at all.

I have a further issue where I make 75 bucks an hour as a contractor, do not get paid if I do not work, in an office that runs 9-6. Guess when the real LBS's are open? So a 100$ fitting could easily be a 250$ fitting.
This has been my experience with fittings at the LBS. Even those that publicize a paid fitting service -- I found it harder than it should have been to actually get the paid service. I stopped in a store to make an appointment for a paid fitting, and the guy had me stand over a bike and told me that he thought it fit fine. He had no concept that I wanted to bring my own bike to improve my riding experience.

What DID work for me was that I was visiting a physical therapist for a running injury. Turns out that he is being trained in bike fitting. He specializes in Tri-Bike fittings, but he could also fit a road bike, He doesn't sell bikes or components. Basically, I left with a "prescription" for a stem length/angle, saddle height/setback, saddle model, bar width, etc . . . everything to get the riding I wanted without pain.
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Old 11-04-17, 10:36 AM
  #23  
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A gunnar frame is totally within your budget and you may not even need custom geometry.
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Old 11-06-17, 03:59 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by Kokiafan View Post
57 year old.
3000 miles/year
235 pounds
Total Height178 Cm
Actual Inseam73 Cm
Trunk66 Cm
Forearm34 Cm
Arm64 Cm
Thigh62 Cm
Lower Leg50 Cm
Sternal Notch144 Cm

Current bike is 56 cm frame and it is tooo big.
The frame I am looking at has a TT of 530 mm.

Bike components are all ultegra--brakes, derailleurs, crank, everything.

My no name carbon frame from nashbar flexes to the point where I can hit my Ultegra crankarm on the chainstays.
Obviously weak.
Do NOT want to spend a ton of money (already have 2000 in the bike) but the frame is just not the right size for me and I cannot buy components to make it fit--have tried.

So I am looking at getting a new frame.

Given my weight, does it make a ton of sense to stay with Carbon?
Or should I be looking at aluminum?

I do mostly short rides during the week and one longish ride every weekend (30-50 miles) so this is for comfort, not speed.

I am looking at a DengFu R02 frame right now, and can get it for 517 all in. It would be great if I could stay right around this price point.

Thoughts?
You are all HELL and GONE too heavy to be riding carbon fiber. As a rule these frames and forks are designed (or rather over-designed) for 180 lbs.

Aluminum bikes that are strong enough are readily available but they ride like a crit bike - stiff as a board though they might be flexy enough under your weight. That would be a bad sign.

I suggest a steel frame. Tomassini makes custom steel frames and forks from Columbus Nemo tubing. With your weight and dimensions I would really suggest you go to them or several other custom builders.

I can understand your concern about money but first of all you should be concerned about your safety on the bike.

One thing you might consider is selling your present bike and getting the Motobecane Gran Premio PRO LTD Reynolds 853 Road Bike. Save Up To 60% Off Pro Level Steel Road Bikes FREE SHIP 48 STATES ON ALL BICYCLES FREE SHIP* Motobecane Gran Premio Elite New Shimano 22 Speed 5800 / 105 + Shimano Wheelsets Reynolds High Grade Steel Road Bikes

And believe me - if your cranks are hitting the chain stay DO NOT ride that bike anymore. This from someone that is on permanent anti-seizure medication from having a carbon fork collapse and getting a severe concussion.
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Old 11-06-17, 04:06 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by dunrobin View Post
carbon fiber bikes have their place, lightweight and stiff, but modern sizing in the industry can make it frustrTinv to those who don't fit the norm. Classic American and British bikes have longer top tubes and shorter seat tubes to match their demographics...northern europeans generally have short legs and long torsos to protect from the elements.
Lemond and serotta fit your ideal. My sarthe has a 53 seat tube and a 55 top tube...look for classic steel. My sarthe was built with true temper and rides nice and stiff, for me...I'm a very strong 185lbs.
Attachment 587312
good luck in your quest regardless.
Nice bike. I'm 6'4" and 185 lbs. I've had some of the best light wheels collapse under me so use cyclocross wheels now.

Probably not a good idea for a non-mechanic to build his own bike up without professional assistance. Otherwise there are a million great steel frame/forks on eBay. It's usually best to buy in-country.
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