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Morbidly obease 445lbs want to get riding

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Morbidly obease 445lbs want to get riding

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Old 11-13-17, 03:37 AM
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Big_G
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Morbidly obease 445lbs want to get riding

Hey there my names gareth and I am looking to get in to riding, a bike to lose my weight along with eating well.

Now I know a few people reading the heading thinking “Jesus” he wants to ride a bike. The answer is yes, I want to be able to ride a bike around a large lake near my home to get the excersise.

I weigh 445lbs and am looking for a bike what will support my weight, I know that there is nothing built for people like me. Dose anyone know or has anyone ever been in this position before any advice would be welcome.

Around the lake is part tarmac and part stony paths that I will be riding on so am assuming larger tyres are a must.

Me

Weight 445lbs
Hight 6ft 1 inch
Age 25


Really any advice on choosing a good first starter bike would be great.

Thanks for taking your time to read this post. I am sorry if you are shocked by My weight also.

Kind Regards

Gareth
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Old 11-13-17, 03:56 AM
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I can't offer any advice, I'm afraid, but I do want to wish you the best of luck with your venture. As you say, you'll probably want to get yourself something with wide tyres, and probably without rear suspension. Don't forget, too, to concentrate on eating well. My personal advice would be to cut out all sources of carbohydrates and refined sugars but to worry less about eating healthy fats and get plenty of vegetables. And, much as I love cycling, don't underestimate the health benefits of walking, too.

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Old 11-13-17, 03:57 AM
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I'd imagine any entry-level hybrid from any major manufacturer would be able to support you, because I doubt, at first, you'd be going very fast so you wouldn't be sending a lot of sharp, hard impacts into the system.

Nothing more specific ... Try the Clydesdale forum (https://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdal...-200-lb-91-kg/) Try google.

One thing I think every one this site will say, is "Good for you." Why wouldn't yo want to ride a bike? it's fun and it is healthy; we all like it.

As for your weight ... Great for you that you are choosing to address it while you are still young. Smart enough to act, brave enough to reach out for help? Well done.
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Old 11-13-17, 04:05 AM
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The right bike frame will support your weight, as my tandem has often held nearly 400 pounds. Sturdy wheels with 40 spokes and 32+mm tires are not inexpensive. Also, tandem appropriate hubs on those wheels.

Contact Co-Motion in Eugene, Oregon.
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Old 11-13-17, 05:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Big_G View Post
I weigh 445lbs and am looking for a bike what will support my weight, I know that there is nothing built for people like me. Dose anyone know or has anyone ever been in this position before any advice would be welcome.
Possibly look at what Worksman has on offer:

https://www.worksmancycles.com/big-bikes.html

They make bikes for industrial settings that are meant to hold up.
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Old 11-13-17, 06:03 AM
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Just choose a bike you feel comfortable on - if you're comfortable, you'll ride it. This will probably require a lot of visits to shops and sitting on lots of bikes - try to go for test rides if you can.

Don't buy a bike with wheels that have a low spoke count (less than 32). Don't forget, wheels are something you can swap out as part of the purchase and a good shop will probably suggest it anyway.

Buy an entry level bike at this point. If you ride lots, your body will change over the next twelve months and you will most likely find yourself buying a new bike in a year's time. By 'body change', I don't mean weight loss, that'll only happen with a change in diet as well, but with lots of riding, you'll build and tune muscles which will affect how you ride the bike.

While you're visiting all those shops and looking at all those bikes, make sure you're evaluating the shop itself. You want one that listens to you, tries to understand you and your needs, and which looks for a solution, not just tries to sell you something they've got in stock. Buy from a good shop and you'll still be buying from them in a decade as well as getting work done and lots of free advice.

Best of luck. If you keep you're eyes open, you'll see some very big people riding around on bikes.
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Old 11-13-17, 06:07 AM
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I don't have any advice for you. I do have positive thoughts and wish you luck. Although I am not at the point you are at, I do know, it's alot easier to gain weight than it is to loose weight. Especially when all the best tasting food, is bad for you.

I don't think your weight will stop you from riding. The right bike will be important. As said above, check out the Clydesdale section. They will be better at giving advice.

Also, as said above, although most bikes aren't made for that kind of weight, but there are alot of bikes that can hold alot of weight. Think of bikes that have racks and people carry quite a bit of weight on them. Even think about other countries, where bikes are the main mode of transportation. They load those bikes down and those bikes don't have the engineering that we are accustom to.

Again, good luck. Check out the Clydesdale forum. And don't give up. If you can get a little bit every week, you are beating it.
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Old 11-13-17, 06:15 AM
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Originally Posted by europa View Post
Buy an entry level bike at this point.
Really, really bad advice.
But his comments that your bike needs and sizing and position will change over time are spot-on, if you are successful in staying with this activity.
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Old 11-13-17, 06:32 AM
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I would look at a steel frame with an upright riding position and 32-36 spoke wheels.

https://www.raleighusa.com/harlan-5219

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Old 11-13-17, 07:15 AM
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Pick a bike built for heavier riders. For instance, I have a 375lbs friend that bought Gary Fisher 29er bike from a local bike shop. On flat surfaces, it did OK. But in the small hills of Island Lake State Park, Michigan, he decided to stand up on the pedals to power himself up. The bottom bracket bearings couldn't take the forces. He had to replace the BB...and once more after the doing the same thing. So buy a bike built for your weight and not one a local bike shop wants to make money on.
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Old 11-13-17, 07:27 AM
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Here's a Workman that has a limit of 450 pounds:

https://www.worksmancycles.com/m2600-urbcom.html

Here are a couple of Zize that have a limit of 550 pounds:

https://www.zizebikes.com/product/zi...f-your-life-20
https://www.zizebikes.com/product/a-new-leaf-20

People on the Clydesdale forum may be able to provide you with more options.

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Old 11-13-17, 07:30 AM
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@Gareth Welcome to BF!

I have a brother who is in your weight category. I've wanted him to ride a bike for a long long time, and I've spent a great deal of time pondering on what would be a decent bike for him.

If I were a doctor - which I'm not - I would prescribe for you to look into recumbent trikes. Do some research. Talk to a bike shop that has them. My theory is that with three wheels supporting you vs two that your weight will be better-supported. A recumbent trike will also handle well, and they are quite comfortable to ride. I am also going to assume that you will have some difficulty getting in and out of it at first, but if you can locate a hand rail nearby and use that it will help.

Once you've lost some weight and gained some strength in your legs at that time you can get a two-wheeler, and I'd recommend a mountain bike with 27+ tires. The wider/taller tires will absorb a lot of impact and give you the perfect transition from recumbent to upright (however, recumbents ARE super-fun and comfy to ride and you may never go back to a regular bike again).

Good luck on your journey.

Keep us posted.
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Old 11-13-17, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Pendergast View Post
Here's a Workman that has a limit of 450 pounds:

https://www.worksmancycles.com/m2600-urbcom.html

Here are a couple of Zize that have a limit of 550 pounds:

https://www.zizebikes.com/product/zi...f-your-life-20
https://www.zizebikes.com/product/a-new-leaf-20

People on the Clydesdale forum may be able to provide you with more options.
Wow! Those bikes look like they's be really great for big people! I sent those two links to my bro. Thanks!
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Old 11-13-17, 07:50 AM
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"People on the Clydesdale forum may be able to provide you with more options."
+1

Based on what I've read here in the past, your weight loss may be slow at first, but don't forget you are also building better cardio health, and that makes a big, positive difference in how you feel.

Also, while you may set an overall goal for target weight and/or riding goals...set small intermediate goals and don't beat yourself up if you reach them later than expected. (Of course celebrate reaching them early, on time or late.)

You didn't mention where you are geographically, that makes a huge difference in what kind of suggestions you get regarding bike shops, resources, routes and human support.

Many people have done this...YOU can do this. All you need is the right attitude and some gumption. Check out the Clydesdale/Athena section of the forum and go, Go, GO!
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Old 11-13-17, 08:41 AM
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A strong frame and wheels will be needed. Many wheels on production bikes are poorly tensioned, so have a bike shop check and re-tension them. If you have spoke breakage problems, you may need to have new wheels built with a higher spoke count. I'd suggest 36 spokes on each wheel as a minimum, and this is still a pretty common spoke count. If you find you need more spokes, 40 spoke and 48 spoke hubs and rims can be had from tandem supply shops, e.g. "Tandems East".

I trust that you're starting this exercise program under a physician's supervision?
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Old 11-13-17, 09:03 AM
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Originally Posted by NoControl View Post
@Gareth Welcome to BF!

I have a brother who is in your weight category. I've wanted him to ride a bike for a long long time, and I've spent a great deal of time pondering on what would be a decent bike for him.

If I were a doctor - which I'm not - I would prescribe for you to look into recumbent trikes. Do some research. Talk to a bike shop that has them. My theory is that with three wheels supporting you vs two that your weight will be better-supported. A recumbent trike will also handle well, and they are quite comfortable to ride. I am also going to assume that you will have some difficulty getting in and out of it at first, but if you can locate a hand rail nearby and use that it will help.

Once you've lost some weight and gained some strength in your legs at that time you can get a two-wheeler, and I'd recommend a mountain bike with 27+ tires. The wider/taller tires will absorb a lot of impact and give you the perfect transition from recumbent to upright (however, recumbents ARE super-fun and comfy to ride and you may never go back to a regular bike again).

Good luck on your journey.

Keep us posted.
I think that the trouble is that a recumbent would be very difficult for someone his size and weight to get into and out of. I'm sure that he would need a tricycle but that wouldn't make any difference. I met a man with partial paralysis that has ridden across the US on a recumbent trike. But it was difficult for me to get into and then back out of. And I'm of the perfect weight for my height.

It did ride nicely though and you wouldn't get saddle sores.
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Old 11-13-17, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by BobbyG View Post
"People on the Clydesdale forum may be able to provide you with more options."
+1

Based on what I've read here in the past, your weight loss may be slow at first, but don't forget you are also building better cardio health, and that makes a big, positive difference in how you feel.

Also, while you may set an overall goal for target weight and/or riding goals...set small intermediate goals and don't beat yourself up if you reach them later than expected. (Of course celebrate reaching them early, on time or late.)

You didn't mention where you are geographically, that makes a huge difference in what kind of suggestions you get regarding bike shops, resources, routes and human support.

Many people have done this...YOU can do this. All you need is the right attitude and some gumption. Check out the Clydesdale/Athena section of the forum and go, Go, GO!
When I restarted riding I was around 30. I was a mess with barely being able to walk upright due to back pain and numbness in my limbs etc. That all disappeared and since I had stopped smoking my lungs cleared up. Everyone told me that garbage in your lungs stays forever but my neurologist said that's an old wive's tale and that you lungs can pretty much return to normal.
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Old 11-13-17, 09:15 AM
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The Clydesdale/Athena forum is filled with knowledge and knowledgeable people, they are very welcoming and helpful. Look to people like Ernest Gagnon for inspiration (there's another guy, whose name escapes me now, but his first bike was a custom build designed to hold his weight, and he got to the point that he rode so much, he had to replace his car tires because they had dry rotted from lack of use), there are people who backslide and people who fail also, but concentrate on the positive.
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Old 11-13-17, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by NoControl View Post
@Gareth Welcome to BF!

I have a brother who is in your weight category. I've wanted him to ride a bike for a long long time, and I've spent a great deal of time pondering on what would be a decent bike for him.

If I were a doctor - which I'm not - I would prescribe for you to look into recumbent trikes. Do some research. Talk to a bike shop that has them. My theory is that with three wheels supporting you vs two that your weight will be better-supported. A recumbent trike will also handle well, and they are quite comfortable to ride. I am also going to assume that you will have some difficulty getting in and out of it at first, but if you can locate a hand rail nearby and use that it will help.

Once you've lost some weight and gained some strength in your legs at that time you can get a two-wheeler, and I'd recommend a mountain bike with 27+ tires. The wider/taller tires will absorb a lot of impact and give you the perfect transition from recumbent to upright (however, recumbents ARE super-fun and comfy to ride and you may never go back to a regular bike again).

Good luck on your journey.

Keep us posted.
I would second the suggestion of getting a trike. Not only do they have three wheels for your weight, some have high weight limitations. As far as getting into and out of a few have quite high seats. And as far as that goes at your weight swinging a leg over a DF bike might not be that easy either.
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Old 11-13-17, 09:52 AM
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As mentioned above, Supportive peers here..https://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdal...-200-lb-91-kg/

Id say generally get a bike shop that will keep what bike you buy in working condition .. Heavy weight on the machine

may need more frequent safety checks, if you are not mechanical and able to do these your self..

a friendly shop can give you a few pointers on that.





....
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Old 11-13-17, 11:31 AM
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1) Welcome to the forums
2) good luck with getting healthier
3) https://www.bicycling.com/food/i-los...ds-riding-bike might be interesting for you to read, he's got a blog too as large fella on a bike
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Old 11-13-17, 12:23 PM
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Checking the Clydesdale forum is good advice. If you're searching for more opinions try the Clydesdale forum over on mtbr.com.

What you're trying is do-able. I know two BIG guys who basically changed their lives through bicycling. Ride as often as you can (3 or 4 times a week). Watch your calories - no 'reward eating' to congratulate yourself for long rides.

Wishing you the best of luck.

Steve Z
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Old 11-13-17, 12:50 PM
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You've made a great choice. You can lose weight and keep it off by staying active and eating right. Cycling is a great choice for staying active. For your 1st bike to start on, a hybrid (typically a mountain bike with no suspension and street tires) would be a good choice. I put many miles on my hybrid and lost a lot of weight before I finally bought a road bike. I still have a lot to lose, but keep chipping away at it. You can do it too.
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Old 11-13-17, 12:59 PM
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At this stage don't spend real dollars on a new bike because your weight will take too much of a toll on it.

Buy a used basic clunker or non-suspension mtn bike. You're looking for something a bit beefy with fat tires, and at a low cost. A coaster brake beach cruiser type bike is perfect.

Find a flat area where you can ride safely, hopefully with multiple route options of different lengths. Ride there building up your range until you can go 10 miles at a sitting, or the bike dies whichever comes first.

By then, you'll have a sense of if and how much you want to stay with it and the kind of riding you're interested in. Then armed with that knowledge you can revisit the issue and shop bikes, or repeat the process with another used clunker but a bit nicer.

As a general rule, I don't suggest investing in a new bike until you're down to 300#s, or better yet 250 because the wear and tear will be too high for you to get good value. That's only a loose general rule, but you'll have your own experience to guide you once you've reached the stage where you want to consider it.
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Old 11-13-17, 01:44 PM
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Hi Gareth-
Cycling is easy on the knees so this will be a great way to get exercise.

-It's worth considering a step-through / low top-tube frame bike like a Linus or similar - some people will call these women's bikes but they most definitely are not. An 80s/90s mountain bike can be great too. I'd stay away from road bikes with geometry that forces you to put weight on your hands.
-You're tall so make sure you can get a full leg-extension on whatever bicycle you end up with.
-Bike wheels are extremely strong - you might need a little more service for the occasional broken spoke but you'll be OK with properly tensioned wheels. Try 26" wheels for a little more strength and a little more tire. Also remember that bikes tubes are porous and tend to lose air-pressure, you'll want to add air every week.
-You can always upgrade once you've ridden a bit.
-Work with a registered dietitian. A dietitian will help you create an action plan and often provide far better advice than your general practitioner. But at the end of the day, don't try a grandiose diet if it's impossible to stick to. Start with something small like cutting-out or reducing the amount of added sugar that you consume. Perhaps it's eliminating or limiting sugared beverages - you can always expand the diet after a little success.
-You got this! Riding bikes is so fun.

Last edited by noahwayout; 11-27-17 at 02:32 PM.
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