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Am I too fat for an aluminum Bike ?

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Am I too fat for an aluminum Bike ?

Old 11-28-17, 07:12 PM
  #26  
SethAZ
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Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
Now that's just ridiculous. Obviously as one continues to lose weight, they need to trade up to heavier and heavier bikes to offset the weight loss.

This is what you buy when you reach your goal weight:

Newb. Check out the training wheels. Or maybe they're to prevent him being crushed to death if he fails to unclip his pedals in time at an intersection.
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Old 11-28-17, 07:19 PM
  #27  
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Good to hear from you again, Mr. Froman.

I didn't know you had a beard.

To the OP: pretty much buy a bike you are comfortable riding. I am a clydesdale and I don't break stuff ... though I do take the weight off my seat for bumps and I don't bash curbs. I was worried when I started riding 20- or 24-spoke wheels but now I don't.

Weight limits on bikes are like "sell-by" dates on canned goods.They have nothing to do with the actual product, they are designed to give lawyers a way to deflect lawsuits.

People act like a bike with a 285-lb "weight limit" will shatter into a million shards if someone who weighs 287 gets on.

My wife thinks that of the milk is older than the "sell-by" date it needs to be dumped ... even though it looks, smells, and tastes fine. I try to explain that the distributor expects you might keep it for a week or ten days in your refrigerator, and adds a few days onto that just in case ....

Right now I am halfway through a case of tomato basil soup which "expired" a month ago. Got it cheap, and it is delicious. That stuff will probably be exactly as edible ten years from now if I don't break the seals on the containers.

Test-ride some bikes. Don't spend too much until know what kind of riding you like best. Try flat-bar and drop-bar. Then ....

Buy a bike and ride it. You will find it is as easy as riding a bike.
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Old 11-28-17, 07:29 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Good to hear from you again, Mr. Froman.

I didn't know you had a beard.

To the OP: pretty much buy a bike you are comfortable riding. I am a clydesdale and I don't break stuff ... though I do take the weight off my seat for bumps and I don't bash curbs. I was worried when I started riding 20- or 24-spoke wheels but now I don't.

Weight limits on bikes are like "sell-by" dates on canned goods.They have nothing to do with the actual product, they are designed to give lawyers a way to deflect lawsuits.

People act like a bike with a 285-lb "weight limit" will shatter into a million shards if someone who weighs 287 gets on.

My wife thinks that of the milk is older than the "sell-by" date it needs to be dumped ... even though it looks, smells, and tastes fine. I try to explain that the distributor expects you might keep it for a week or ten days in your refrigerator, and adds a few days onto that just in case ....

Right now I am halfway through a case of tomato basil soup which "expired" a month ago. Got it cheap, and it is delicious. That stuff will probably be exactly as edible ten years from now if I don't break the seals on the containers.

Test-ride some bikes. Don't spend too much until know what kind of riding you like best. Try flat-bar and drop-bar. Then ....

Buy a bike and ride it. You will find it is as easy as riding a bike.

I DO in fact have a beard in real life

That's good advice for the most part. I don't think any bike frame is not capable of handling an additional hundred pounds. Wheels...probably all could handle the extra weight as well...some better than others. I don't think there is a quality adult bike that is just going to crumble underneath you from a ride around the block.

The one absolute I would put out there though - do NOT get skinny tires. At your weight, I would not consider anything smaller than 28mm, and even that might be pushing it a bit.

With, say a 23mm tire, you'll either have to pump it up to dangerously high pressure, AND endure tires hard enough to rattle your teeth out, or lower pressure and get constant pinch flats. Going off of this calculator, you'd have to pump the rear tire to 207 psi with 23mm tires Bicycle tire pressure calculator

28mm tires would be doable for you, but still a bit sketchy. So the tires will limit your options some. Personally, if you're planning on being on the road, i'd go for a gravel or cyclocross bike...something capable of taking 35mm+ tires.
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Old 11-28-17, 07:34 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by exmechanic89 View Post
This is very true. Even as a light rider I lift off the saddle on road imperfections, its much easier on the wheels. Probably much easier on the entire bike actually.
.. and easier on the rider. 😉
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Old 11-28-17, 07:51 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by GoProTrek View Post
Hi, I am 53 and 6'-1 at 320 lbs, I wanna start riding again and want a Trek bike. i have a budget of 750 bucks but bike descriptions on Treks site say nothing about Maximum weights....just curious, the guy at the bike shop said he been there 3 years and never heard anything about weight limits. just worried about crushing an aluminum frame. Thanks
Id recommend

Giant Sedona DX $500 (26 inch sturdy wheels will surely be strong enough to handle you)

Raleigh Redux 2 (Raleigh makes a really good quality City/Hybrid)

Diamondback Haanjo (Solid Quick Bike)

Giant Toughroad SLR2 (I am 330lbs.. I own this.. It handles me fine and I can go pretty quick on it)

Giant Roam 2 $580

Giant Talon 2-3 (Both of these are tough and could handle you)

Trek FX 3

If you up your Budget.. Get a Surly Troll, Long Haul Trucker, or Ogre.. Surly are steel frame Beast of a Bike..
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Old 11-28-17, 08:05 PM
  #31  
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OP hasn't returned since posting this one.
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Old 11-28-17, 08:20 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by qcpmsame View Post
OP hasn't returned since posting this one.
they do that at times.. sometimes days
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Old 11-28-17, 08:25 PM
  #33  
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^^^^ Yep, it seems Elvis has left the building.

Newbs.
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Old 11-28-17, 11:58 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Seems straightforward to me.

Design all your road frames according to similar sets of durability requirements, the higher-end bikes end up lighter, and pick a single boilerplate max weight figure that's simple for sales and leaves you with decent liability clearance.
I question whether or not the design of the bike has much to do with the weight limits. They obviously aren't going to make the aluminum frame of the inexpensive bike lighter so that it fits the weight limit. That would cost too much on a bicycle with a thin profit margin to begin with. They are just building it out of tubing that is very similar in composition and thickness to the tubing used on the hybrid but applying the limit of their carbon bikes to that aluminum frame because of the liability.

On the other hand, they are missing sales opportunities. The aluminum bike's weight limit should be higher than a carbon frame. Steering heavier riders away from the carbon frames would save them in warranty claims but having that weight limit on the metal bike loses them sales to heavier riders. It also doesn't serve as much of a "hook" to get riders to buy your product and develop product loyalty. A heavy rider isn't necessarily going to always be a heavy rider.
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Old 11-29-17, 12:13 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
The aluminum bike's weight limit should be higher than a carbon frame.
Huh? I don't see anything weird about a lighter CF frame being able to support just as heavy a rider as a cheaper aluminum frame. CF frames can manage considerably better strength:weight.

They obviously aren't going to make the aluminum frame of the inexpensive bike lighter so that it fits the weight limit. That would cost too much on a bicycle with a thin profit margin to begin with. They are just building it out of tubing that is very similar in composition and thickness to the tubing used on the hybrid but applying the limit of their carbon bikes to that aluminum frame because of the liability.
The Emonda ALR is one of the lightest production aluminum road frames out there. As far as thin margins go... they're outpriced by most similar-at-a-glance competition. And while they're not terribly specific, Trek does claim that the Emonda ALR uses a different aluminum manufacture process than the hybrids (200-series vs 300-series).

Last edited by HTupolev; 11-29-17 at 12:38 AM.
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Old 11-29-17, 08:53 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Huh? I don't see anything weird about a lighter CF frame being able to support just as heavy a rider as a cheaper aluminum frame. CF frames can manage considerably better strength:weight.
Weight limits never were a thing before carbon fiber. They may have existed but most companies either didn't advertise them or ignored them.

That said, yes, carbon has a higher strength to weight ratio but it is usually used in much lower amounts of material than other frame materials. Less weight means less strength.

However, don't you find it odd that every single bicycle has the same weight limit? Trek does the same thing with their mountain bikes except that put a 300 pound limit on them. And that's for hardtails or dually, aluminum or carbon. The way I see it is that it isn't a "weight limit" as it's a liability limit.
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Old 11-29-17, 09:17 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by qcpmsame View Post
OP hasn't returned since posting this one.
Didn't think he would. But now that I wrote this, he will, just to make it look like it planned to all along.
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Old 11-29-17, 09:25 AM
  #38  
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I don't find it odd at all that different bikes would all have the same weight limit. That's the minimum design criteria every bike is designed to meet. Some will probably do better in actual testing. Steel, AL, Carbon doesn't matter. They can all be designed to support any weight rider. A carbon bike is lighter supporting the same weight as a steel bike, that's why they use carbon. A smart manufacturer would rather exclude as few riders as possible.
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Old 11-29-17, 02:00 PM
  #39  
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I've had new and used bikes, kept the spoke count at least 32, and never had a problem with either steel or aluminum bicycles in about 15 years of riding, both road and mountain bikes. I own a Technium now, and no, that hasn't become unglued either. Keep the spoke count wide, and the tires also a bit wide,700x 28 or 32, and you should be just fine. I also am over six feet and over three hundred, but I used to be closer to four hundred. I'm glad you've found cycling, it's a great way to lose weight, I just need to do more of it!
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Old 11-30-17, 10:27 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by exmechanic89 View Post
This is very true. Even as a light rider I lift off the saddle on road imperfections, its much easier on the wheels. Probably much easier on the entire bike actually.
Much easier on me.
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Old 12-06-17, 04:51 PM
  #41  
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Thanks everyone, I have decided i to lose at least 30 lbs and get 295lbs or less before buying a bike. 7 lbs so far... after a few weeks i decided goals would be the best thing to learn and ride right now.
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Old 12-06-17, 04:54 PM
  #42  
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Haha !

Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Good to hear from you again, Mr. Froman.

I didn't know you had a beard.

To the OP: pretty much buy a bike you are comfortable riding. I am a clydesdale and I don't break stuff ... though I do take the weight off my seat for bumps and I don't bash curbs. I was worried when I started riding 20- or 24-spoke wheels but now I don't.

Weight limits on bikes are like "sell-by" dates on canned goods.They have nothing to do with the actual product, they are designed to give lawyers a way to deflect lawsuits.

People act like a bike with a 285-lb "weight limit" will shatter into a million shards if someone who weighs 287 gets on.

My wife thinks that of the milk is older than the "sell-by" date it needs to be dumped ... even though it looks, smells, and tastes fine. I try to explain that the distributor expects you might keep it for a week or ten days in your refrigerator, and adds a few days onto that just in case ....

Right now I am halfway through a case of tomato basil soup which "expired" a month ago. Got it cheap, and it is delicious. That stuff will probably be exactly as edible ten years from now if I don't break the seals on the containers.

Test-ride some bikes. Don't spend too much until know what kind of riding you like best. Try flat-bar and drop-bar. Then ....

Buy a bike and ride it. You will find it is as easy as riding a bike.
i am eating tomato basil soup as i read this..thats funny ! send some of that my way if you throw any out !
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Old 12-06-17, 07:15 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
Now that's just ridiculous. Obviously as one continues to lose weight, they need to trade up to heavier and heavier bikes to offset the weight loss.

This is what you buy when you reach your goal weight:

,,,,, well I don't think he's fully ready to ride ,, I see he still has the training wheels on,,,,
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Old 12-06-17, 10:00 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by GoProTrek View Post
Thanks everyone, I have decided i to lose at least 30 lbs and get 295lbs or less before buying a bike. 7 lbs so far... after a few weeks i decided goals would be the best thing to learn and ride right now.
Keep adding to your budget anyway and reward yourself with a better bike. Good luck with the weight loss, I will hopefully work on it myself because I need to lose some of this winter weight from 3 winters ago
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