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38 mm replace 35 mm - danger in anyway?

Old 02-22-18, 06:50 PM
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38 mm replace 35 mm - danger in anyway?

I replaced a 700 x 35 mm semi-slick tires with a 700 x 38 mm treaded tires. They are huge; probably closer to 45 mm when figuring in the treads. They roll perfectly. I have some questions:

1. When I turn sharply it feels awkward. Is this dangerous in anyway? Or will I just get used to it?

2. Is there any chance of this tire popping off when I am riding?
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Old 02-22-18, 07:07 PM
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Originally Posted by lindafranc
I replaced a 700 x 35 mm semi-slick tires with a 700 x 38 mm treaded tires. They are huge; probably closer to 45 mm when figuring in the treads. They roll perfectly. I have some questions:

1. When I turn sharply it feels awkward. Is this dangerous in anyway? Or will I just get used to it?

2. Is there any chance of this tire popping off when I am riding?
What tire are you talking about?
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Old 02-22-18, 07:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
What tire are you talking about?
She started a post a few days ago on getting Schwalbe Marathon GT 365s. But I aint saying nothing as the tire experts here will jump ya
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Old 02-22-18, 07:39 PM
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If your bike was factory equipped with 35c tires, you'll be just fine running 38's. Closer to 45? I doubt it. They may seem a lot wider, especially if the 35's you were running weren't an actual 35 - some are closer to 32-33. Possibly popping off? Seriously doubt that too (as long as you keep them inflated properly). Any bike will handle "awkward" when the bars are turned sharply. I'm pretty sure you're going to get the hang of it eventually.

-Kedosto
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Old 02-22-18, 08:10 PM
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1.) what is your bike ('s frame)???

2.) what is your rim profiles??

3.) and what is tires you bought??

To answer the question

1.) Awkward? chances you mismatch rim to tires type or you just way too low pressures to weights or . . . . rim spokes not correctly tension or . . . unknown phenomenon.

2.) Yep, too large, risks of burping, risks of crashes IF you sharply turn, mostly you will be fine on straights and gentle turns.
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Old 02-22-18, 08:15 PM
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Narrower tires are quicker steering, and more precise, than larger - you will get used to them!

It's all part of the trade off for a more plush ride/
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Old 02-22-18, 10:06 PM
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If they aren't rubbing, I wouldn't worry.
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Old 02-23-18, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Kedosto
If your bike was factory equipped with 35c tires, you'll be just fine running 38's. Closer to 45? I doubt it. They may seem a lot wider, especially if the 35's you were running weren't an actual 35 - some are closer to 32-33. Possibly popping off? Seriously doubt that too (as long as you keep them inflated properly). Any bike will handle "awkward" when the bars are turned sharply. I'm pretty sure you're going to get the hang of it eventually.

Off they came, back to 35s, bike steers like it's on rails, tracking a line consistently. Hands free at any speed, even around corners.

-Kedosto
Or..... OP could have altered the trail enough to induce/increase wheel flop. I know that sounds crazy but I have experienced exactly that. I went from a 100% slick 35mm (measured) tire to a 100% slick 45mm (measured) tire and the steering and handling became nasty. Significantly. The bike wanted to fall into turns all on its own. And once into a corner, it wanted to tighten the line all by itself. It required constant rider input to maintain a line. PITA and didn't feel safe. Hands free? NO chance.

Granted, my bike was probably already at the extreme end of high trail and the larger tires pushed it over the edge into no man's land, but it could be possible that OP is experiencing the same thing.
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Old 02-23-18, 01:47 PM
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when ever you put a tire on, make sure the tube is only securely within=between , not under the tire bead..

before inflating the innertube..







..

Last edited by fietsbob; 02-23-18 at 02:58 PM.
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Old 02-23-18, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Kedosto
If your bike was factory equipped with 35c tires, you'll be just fine running 38's. Closer to 45? I doubt it. They may seem a lot wider, especially if the 35's you were running weren't an actual 35 - some are closer to 32-33. Possibly popping off? Seriously doubt that too (as long as you keep them inflated properly). Any bike will handle "awkward" when the bars are turned sharply. I'm pretty sure you're going to get the hang of it eventually.

-Kedosto
I had GT365 38s on my 18 mm internal rims until recently and I measured them at 41 mm with my caliper. She might be a little high but not off the charts. These do run big.

(As an aside, I prefer this to the substantially-smaller-than-advertised continentals that make one wonder whether they have a ruler at their factory.)
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Old 02-23-18, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by hman0217
I had GT365 38s on my 18 mm internal rims until recently and I measured them at 41 mm with my caliper. She might be a little high but not off the charts. These do run big.

(As an aside, I prefer this to the substantially-smaller-than-advertised continentals that make one wonder whether they have a ruler at their factory.)
Do you think replacing them with the 35 mm tires that came with the Trek Verve (2016) will present any dangers? I may seem paranoid but with the 35 mm I have dangerously slipped a number of times on a variety of surfaces. Should I get the 35 mm GT 365 to be safe?
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Old 02-23-18, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by lindafranc
I replaced a 700 x 35 mm semi-slick tires with a 700 x 38 mm treaded tires. They are huge; probably closer to 45 mm when figuring in the treads. They roll perfectly. I have some questions:
If this is the Marathon 365 people are talking about, then

1. When I turn sharply it feels awkward. Is this dangerous in anyway? Or will I just get used to it?
Not unusual for a tire with knobby side treads to feel a little squirmy under hard cornering. That is just those treads squirming around.

2. Is there any chance of this tire popping off when I am riding?
Unless there is something wrong with your rims, no. Well, at least not any more chance than any other tire popping off.
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Old 02-23-18, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by lindafranc
Do you think replacing them with the 35 mm tires that came with the Trek Verve (2016) will present any dangers? I may seem paranoid but with the 35 mm I have dangerously slipped a number of times on a variety of surfaces. Should I get the 35 mm GT 365 to be safe?
If you're asking me, I think "danger", for most situations, might be a little extreme. I looked up those Trek Verve 2016 tires and they seem to be Bontrager H5s, correct? Those are similar in profile to some specialized tires I had before I got my GT365s. Perhaps we were similarly motivated in wanting more tread with a higher profile.

While I prefer the GT365s for city riding, I don't think the H5s would be "dangerous" by any means. They might not be as good in loose dirt or other non-asphalt conditions, but you're looking at slippage of the tires moreso than catastrophic wipe-outs. How aggressively are you riding?

The one thing you WOULD get with the original 35s is less rolling resistance, meaning they'll likely be faster on pavement.

I recently swapped out my GT365s with Clement MS0 Xplorer 38s and I'm madly in love. There you get great grip on all surfaces (except the elusive mud) but with very little rolling resistance on the roads. (because I know you were begging to be confused with more options ;p)

EDIT: Forgot to address that option...the GT365s in 35 mm would be less rolling resistance than the 38s due to less contact surface and higher tread profile than the H5s. But I think you'd find the 38s will give you more traction on the slippery stuff, at least going straight. It's a trade-off one way or another. Honestly, it's trial-and-error. It's a function of your riding, your frame, your terrain and your tires, at the very least.

Last edited by hman0217; 02-23-18 at 03:14 PM.
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Old 02-23-18, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by lindafranc
Should I get the 35 mm GT 365 to be safe?
Huh? I thought you already had GT 365 tires?
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Old 02-23-18, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
Huh? I thought you already had GT 365 tires?
Yes, I have the GT but the 38 mm. As you can see it is actually measured at 41 mm. It's big. I just want to be sure it's ok on my bike. I read in another post where Trek said they recommended maximum size is 38 mm on the Verve 2016. So I got the 38 mm. Now when I turn sharply it is not a smooth turn. I 'm just wondering if the tire is in fact too big that I could have an accident if I was for example going fast and had to turn.
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Old 02-23-18, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by lindafranc
Yes, I have the GT but the 38 mm. As you can see it is actually measured at 41 mm. It's big. I just want to be sure it's ok on my bike. I read in another post where Trek said they recommended maximum size is 38 mm on the Verve 2016. So I got the 38 mm. Now when I turn sharply it is not a smooth turn. I 'm just wondering if the tire is in fact too big that I could have an accident if I was for example going fast and had to turn.
As long as the tires clear your frame and fork (i.e., they don't rub) there is literally no reason you can't run them. Trek is well aware that tire size can vary a bit from the stated size, so they say "38mm max" just to be safe. Seriously, this is a non-issue.

The squirming you are feeling under hard turning is due to the treads, not the size. Going with the 35mm version of the GT 365 will likely have the same issue. It is normal for a tire like that. You give up some handling for the traction in bad conditions.
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Old 02-23-18, 04:28 PM
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Originally Posted by hman0217
If you're asking me, I think "danger", for most situations, might be a little extreme. I looked up those Trek Verve 2016 tires and they seem to be Bontrager H5s, correct? Those are similar in profile to some specialized tires I had before I got my GT365s. Perhaps we were similarly motivated in wanting more tread with a higher profile.

While I prefer the GT365s for city riding, I don't think the H5s would be "dangerous" by any means. They might not be as good in loose dirt or other non-asphalt conditions, but you're looking at slippage of the tires moreso than catastrophic wipe-outs. How aggressively are you riding?

The one thing you WOULD get with the original 35s is less rolling resistance, meaning they'll likely be faster on pavement.

I recently swapped out my GT365s with Clement MS0 Xplorer 38s and I'm madly in love. There you get great grip on all surfaces (except the elusive mud) but with very little rolling resistance on the roads. (because I know you were begging to be confused with more options ;p)

EDIT: Forgot to address that option...the GT365s in 35 mm would be less rolling resistance than the 38s due to less contact surface and higher tread profile than the H5s. But I think you'd find the 38s will give you more traction on the slippery stuff, at least going straight. It's a trade-off one way or another. Honestly, it's trial-and-error. It's a function of your riding, your frame, your terrain and your tires, at the very least.
The original tires were the H5. I slipped on these numerous times on different surfaces (wet pavement, gravel driveway and dry pavement when braking hard) that put me in danger of falling. Now with the 38 mm GT 365 I feel very stable and the grip is great. However, as noted, when I turn sharply they seem to get in the way. I just hope that if I ever have to turn quickly that I don't fall. Also as noted. in another post Trek said the maximum on the Verve that I have is 38 mm. I wonder if 41 mm is in fact something I should not be riding on.
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Old 02-23-18, 05:23 PM
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Originally Posted by lindafranc
The original tires were the H5. I slipped on these numerous times on different surfaces (wet pavement, gravel driveway and dry pavement when braking hard) that put me in danger of falling. Now with the 38 mm GT 365 I feel very stable and the grip is great. However, as noted, when I turn sharply they seem to get in the way. I just hope that if I ever have to turn quickly that I don't fall. Also as noted. in another post Trek said the maximum on the Verve that I have is 38 mm. I wonder if 41 mm is in fact something I should not be riding on.

I think you're going to have to choose between one and the other pro/con if you must choose between the two you have.

The GT365s are a touring tire, built for durability and straight-line grip. They're not a performance tire where you can do tight cornering.

The others, as you mention, are slippery in certain situations.

That's why I LOVE LOVE LOVE the clement MSO xplorers. I can't post URLs until I have two more posts so please just google them.

They give the best of both worlds. Incredible stability and nimble cornering.


Other best-of-both-worlds options include the Kenda Small Block 8 & Happy Medium, as well as the Soma Cazadero. I think these are all available in the 38-42 range. I'm sure others can chime in with other best-of-both-worlds options.

By the way, there are two things that affect the max possible tire size: the clearance in the fork (front) and seat stays (rear) and the internal rim width. If you have a rim width of, say, 17mm or more, then you're totally fine to do a 42 mm tire. That said, not all companies measure their tires the same. You'd think a mm is a mm but the bike world seems to indicate otherwise.


Disclaimer: I speak only my opinion and invariably I suspect others will differ in their choice of tire for what you wish to accomplish.
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Old 02-23-18, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by hman0217
I think you're going to have to choose between one and the other pro/con if you must choose between the two you have.

The GT365s are a touring tire, built for durability and straight-line grip. They're not a performance tire where you can do tight cornering.

The others, as you mention, are slippery in certain situations.

That's why I LOVE LOVE LOVE the clement MSO xplorers. I can't post URLs until I have two more posts so please just google them.

They give the best of both worlds. Incredible stability and nimble cornering.


Other best-of-both-worlds options include the Kenda Small Block 8 & Happy Medium, as well as the Soma Cazadero. I think these are all available in the 38-42 range. I'm sure others can chime in with other best-of-both-worlds options.

By the way, there are two things that affect the max possible tire size: the clearance in the fork (front) and seat stays (rear) and the internal rim width. If you have a rim width of, say, 17mm or more, then you're totally fine to do a 42 mm tire. That said, not all companies measure their tires the same. You'd think a mm is a mm but the bike world seems to indicate otherwise.


Disclaimer: I speak only my opinion and invariably I suspect others will differ in their choice of tire for what you wish to accomplish.
Thank you for the recommendations. Right now I'm set with the GT 365. I really like them, especially since they were formulated for cold and wet surfaces. One last thing I will say is that the rolling resistance is not affected by the much larger size. It rolls just as fast as the H 35 mm. What is different is the effort needed to get up to speed. I would say it's like 30% more peddling effort. Once at speed there is no difference in peddling. On a 3 mile ride to the store what took me 15 to 20 minutes may now take 18 to 23 minutes. To me that is well worth the trade off in safety. Plus I get a little more aerobically fit.
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Old 02-24-18, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta
Not unusual for a tire with knobby side treads to feel a little squirmy under hard cornering. That is just those treads squirming around.
Absolutely. Twenty years ago I tried hybrid road/trail tires...knobby tires with a smooth center section. Any time I went to turn they lots lots of grip.

I'm no expert (as I continue to demonstrate with each post) but I can share my personal experience. Grip varies by tire compound, and even by tire design and shape. I now run slicks on my 700x32 commuter and the transition from straight to cornering is nice.

I added big, fat slicks to my MTB/Commuter/Utility bike last spring and it is a joy to ride and corner, although they seem to "wander" a bit more on the straights than the thinner tires I had previous run.

My old road bike has slightly treaded 700x32 which have worn smooth in the center, and they feel a little less grippy when I lean to corner and they get on the tread.

A year or two ago I had some Continental touring II's which were mildly treaded and smooth-shouldered which should have made them feel more secure when turning, but it was the opposite. The center tread seemed to be softer and grippier than the harder, slicker sides, so corning was not great.

My newest bike came with Kenda "Small-Block 8's" which were micro-knobbies. They seemed to corner okay, but I think that was a function of the "sameness" of the grip from center to side. And while they were comfortable and supple, they did require more pedalling effort than slicks.

My summation is that tires that are uniformly grippy from center to side provide more uniform grip when transitioning from straight-ahead riding to cornering, but differences in tread and compound can also make a difference.

There are no measurements for this, just anecdotal accounts.
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