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Bike for a fat guy

Old 03-06-18, 04:31 PM
  #1  
Viking000040
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Bike for a fat guy

Hello all.
I am sure this topic has been covered but I am looking for current advice. I am looking for a bike that can handle 375lbs. I am on a budget but could spend $400 or $500 including any customizing, I do realize that that's not a lot of money, but it's what I can swing. I have some knee issues that preclude a lot of walking and I used to ride casually years ago so I thought I would like to start again as a way of exercise. I am starting to eat better but need to put some exercise in the program. My riding would be mostly pavement, but some dirt and gravel trails. Does anyone have any specific brands and models that they can recommend? I would like to go with the mountain bike style as they seem more versatile for the riding that I will be doing. I like to have my legs under me and lean a bit forward at the waist as opposed to the upright cruiser bike style.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 03-06-18, 04:40 PM
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tried a bike shop yet? service after the sale is valuable.. pick the shop, then the bike.. they will help with the selection..


Sub Forum: https://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdal...-200-lb-91-kg/
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Old 03-06-18, 05:02 PM
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I would say that at any given price point, features and component levels are going to be pretty similar between brands. It's more important to find a shop with good service, including fitting you to the right bike, and a warranty on the bike.
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Old 03-07-18, 12:33 AM
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Viking+bunch of 0....
Stick to name brand mountain bike and put some slicks on it. That weight will disappear slowly so long as you follow a diet. as someone else posted the link to the Clydesdale forum. Your weight of 375 is just 25 over the manufacturer max. I called trek for a an old single track they advised of the 350 max capacity.
If you decide on a road bike you have alot of research to do mostly rims.

One suggestion is pick up a used bike from a local bike shop or Craigslist. Have it serviced and save your money for accessories.

Hope this helps
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Old 03-07-18, 12:39 AM
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Forgot to mention my buddy is 425 and has no problem on that single trek with slicks.
Also find a wally Mart and get your shirts from there, you will find the name on the forum of the DRI fit style shirt.

Best of luck to you. Start off and take it slow. Don't burn yourself out.
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Old 03-07-18, 01:16 AM
  #6  
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You might like the Specialized Roll. My bf is 350 and finds it comfortable. The basic model fits your budget, and you may be able to find last years’ model on sale somewhere: https://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/fitness--urban/fitness--hybrid-bikes/roll/c/fitnessroll
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Old 03-07-18, 02:08 AM
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I'd want a full bouncer. I now use a square-wire die press spring now, as I have not only myself on the bike, but also two batteries, shopping and a child on the back. The springs are available in all manner of diameters, lengths and strengths. That's if you're struggling to find full bouncers that have a comfortable rate.

I also use balloon tyres, they're great, not the most aerodynamic things in the world but if your aim is to get fit instead of get the fastest lap times, they'll do it and you need not worry about getting pinch flats.
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Old 03-07-18, 05:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Viking000040 View Post
Hello all.
I am sure this topic has been covered but I am looking for current advice. I am looking for a bike that can handle 375lbs. I am on a budget but could spend $400 or $500 including any customizing,...
Maybe talk to Worksman. For example, the specs for the following bike mention that an upgraded version is available that will handle 500 pounds:

https://www.worksmancycles.com/flyer-cruiser.html

Maybe talk to them and see what they can do.
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Old 03-07-18, 06:41 AM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by Viking000040 View Post
Hello all.
I am sure this topic has been covered but I am looking for current advice. I am looking for a bike that can handle 375lbs. I am on a budget but could spend $400 or $500 including any customizing, I do realize that that's not a lot of money, but it's what I can swing. I have some knee issues that preclude a lot of walking and I used to ride casually years ago so I thought I would like to start again as a way of exercise. I am starting to eat better but need to put some exercise in the program. My riding would be mostly pavement, but some dirt and gravel trails. Does anyone have any specific brands and models that they can recommend? I would like to go with the mountain bike style as they seem more versatile for the riding that I will be doing. I like to have my legs under me and lean a bit forward at the waist as opposed to the upright cruiser bike style.

Thanks in advance.
You will have a hard time finding new mountain bike in your price range. Used maybe a different story. Lots of older mountain bikes you can probably find for less than your 400 budget. If you can, go with a bike without suspension, do so. If it has aggressive knobbies, switch them out for slick tires.

If you did go new, wheels would be the weakest part of the bike for someone your weight, followed by front suspension. You could easily allocate your entire budget to new wheels to accomodate your weight. Paradoxically, older mountain bikes, and even hybrids often come with more substantial wheels than do current ones.

Last edited by MRT2; 03-07-18 at 06:51 AM.
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Old 03-07-18, 10:36 AM
  #10  
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I certainly don't know as fact, but I'd think weight limit's are based on stresses for when the bike is used at the common extremes of the genre the bike is made for. So unless you are going to be jumping ravines on a mountain bike or riding bumpy roads at 30 mph on a road bike, don't get too bogged down by them. Be careful, but don't let them limit you.

As well I wouldn't spend a lot on my first bike, or second for that matter. If you stick with it and get fitter, you might find your riding style changes as well as the type of riding you want to do. The value of a new bike drops as fast or faster than a new car.
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Old 03-07-18, 10:44 AM
  #11  
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You might have better luck in the Clydesdale section. There's a lot of big guys over there that don't seem to post much in other sections.
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Old 03-07-18, 12:28 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by ggoytia1 View Post
Viking+bunch of 0....
Stick to name brand mountain bike and put some slicks on it. That weight will disappear slowly so long as you follow a diet. as someone else posted the link to the Clydesdale forum. Your weight of 375 is just 25 over the manufacturer max. I called trek for a an old single track they advised of the 350 max capacity.
If you decide on a road bike you have alot of research to do mostly rims.

One suggestion is pick up a used bike from a local bike shop or Craigslist. Have it serviced and save your money for accessories.

Hope this helps
If that is true, I agree. However, many, maybe even most new bikes have a max weight of 275 for rider and equipment. I might feel comfortable exceeding max weight on a bike by 20 or 30 lbs, but maybe not 100 lbs.
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Old 03-07-18, 02:36 PM
  #13  
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I don't know if you should be too paranoid about the manufacturers' weight limits. For one thing, there are certainly lawyers involved with those numbers. For another, bike frames have to be made with built-in safety factors to account for things like curbs and potholes encountered at the highest speeds a bike is reasonably expected to attain. All over the world, bicycles are routinely used to carry much heavier loads, though many of those are 'utility bikes' overengineered for the purpose (they're as heavy as they are expensive, but last for decades).

If the weight factor really worries you, I'd suggest starting with a steel frame. As to your preference for a forward riding stance, as opposed to upright, the difference can be as simple as a change of handlebars.
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Old 03-07-18, 02:44 PM
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The biggest issue is with the rear wheel breaking spokes. As long as the rear wheel is solid, I think it's pretty rare for the frame to fail because of rider weight .
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Old 03-07-18, 04:01 PM
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Call manufacturer of that specific bike if it makes you feel better. At your weight as long as your not jumping off of anything like a wild eyed invincible teenager your golden.
Also try your lbs see what they say. Try things out and go from there is you want new or used.

Avoid suspension bikes is what my buddy told me.
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Old 03-07-18, 04:12 PM
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Look at slickdeals.net and search under bikes, cycling, bicycles. They have a few deals.
Btw you don't need disk breaks to stop. Regualr brakes are good enough
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Old 03-07-18, 04:26 PM
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Maybe something like this:

Save Up to 60% Off 29Plus, 27Plus Fat Bikes, Mountain Save Up to 60% Off New Bikes


$500 is you assemble it yourself (it's fairly easy to assemble). You're pretty limited by the $500 ceiling unless you find a used bike that fits you.
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Old 03-07-18, 04:34 PM
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Originally Posted by rollagain View Post
I don't know if you should be too paranoid about the manufacturers' weight limits. For one thing, there are certainly lawyers involved with those numbers. For another, bike frames have to be made with built-in safety factors to account for things like curbs and potholes encountered at the highest speeds a bike is reasonably expected to attain. All over the world, bicycles are routinely used to carry much heavier loads, though many of those are 'utility bikes' overengineered for the purpose (they're as heavy as they are expensive, but last for decades).

If the weight factor really worries you, I'd suggest starting with a steel frame. As to your preference for a forward riding stance, as opposed to upright, the difference can be as simple as a change of handlebars.
There was a time when bikes were overbuilt, but not every bike is over built, which is why they put in those recommended weight limits. A utility bike built to handle cargo will be built to take a heavy load, as will certain touring bikes. Other bikes? Maybe not so much.

Originally Posted by ggoytia1 View Post
Call manufacturer of that specific bike if it makes you feel better. At your weight as long as your not jumping off of anything like a wild eyed invincible teenager your golden.
Also try your lbs see what they say. Try things out and go from there is you want new or used.

Avoid suspension bikes is what my buddy told me.
Actually, Op weighs as much as two fully grown men that are just a couple of meals shy of posting in this forum, and more than 3 average weight women. You might pause before telling two 190 lb men or 3 160 lb womento rig up something so they could all ride together on one bike, even if they weren't jumping curbs, or bombing down a hill. There are bikes built to handle this kind of weight, but it certainly isn't every bike.

No need to be paranoid about weight limits, but super clydes shouldn't ignore them either.

Last edited by MRT2; 03-07-18 at 04:38 PM.
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Old 03-09-18, 12:55 PM
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As has already been suggested: Worksman. Period. You wouldn't believe the abuse we put on them and they just won't die. I own one that spent 40 years inside the factory I work in before it was surplused. All it needed was cosmetics and basic maintenance to put it back in action.

Worksman is not in the weight-weenie game or the techno-upgrade rat-race. They make the same bikes they've made in the same way they've made for 100 years. Each one is like a time capsule to your grandfathers childhood. For your budget and requirements, I strongly suggest you give them some consideration.

Oh, one last thing. Wax the whole frame and the chrome with carnuba wax, let it dry, and buff it out. Do it yearly & Don't store it outside or exposed to weather. Alloys don't rust as eagerly as steel and Worksman paint has changed as much as their design...It hasn't.
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Old 03-09-18, 04:38 PM
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A trike would be good, but unless you would find a great deal on a used one, they are probably out of your price range. They are good because they spread weigh out on 3 wheels.
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Old 03-11-18, 12:52 PM
  #21  
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late suggestion?

Start with your LBS. A lot of clydesdales look to trade in their first bikes after dropping serious weight. And that seems to happen sooner than you would think. They get faster quicker than average and want better bikes. After all, they start with a serious amount of muscle and that works in their favor as they lose weight! I ride with several of those guys within the local groups (loosely connected thru our local bike shop) and they all are faster than most of us in less than a year. At my age I don't ride with the "A" team guys of course, but still...
Your biggest risk to the wallet. Most of the guys opt for fast carbon bikes as soon as they get under 275!
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Old 03-11-18, 03:51 PM
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Older mountain bike with a steel frame and fork might be best. Correct size frame. Stem and handlebars can also be changed for added comfort. Older used (preferably "used", but unused) mountain bikes can be found for under $100. Tires, tubes, rim liners and brake pads can sometimes be dried out on them, or not. Good tires for the added weight is a plus. Nashbar and Niagara have good prices online for them.Get a physical. Discuss goals with your physician. Take it slow to start. Be cautious. Stay on level terrain. Get to love cycling..not difficult. Stick with it. Don't fight fatigue with calories. Consider a road bike when you are down to 235.
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