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Bought bike online, go to shop for service?

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Bought bike online, go to shop for service?

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Old 04-13-18, 11:03 AM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by Krikemancer View Post
Hi all,

I've bought my bike online because it was much cheaper than in the official retailer's shop.
Now I'm not sure if I can go to the shop for service/maintenance after buying it online instead of at the retailer.

Moral dilemma?

Cheers
Christophe
Bike shops will take your money regardless... If you shop in their store regularly it may be a little bit awkward.

Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
My local bike shop has saved the day for me more than once.
This... One time I brought my steel frame into a Trek shop (not a Trek but a Giant to add insult). I'd punctured about 10miles from home. Riding in my local area I don't generally carry a new tube and to be honest with the age of the tyre I shouldn't have been out riding on it anyway. Nothing said, no hard words, a bit of banter I walked out with a new tube and some glue in my tyre to get me home.

People underrate service like that until its gone. It reminds me of another hobby of mine which is medium format film photography. There is one old guy left in my area that can fix mechanical cameras, or make new mechanical parts. He'd be in his 70s or 80s now. Once people like that are gone there's no one younger that's interested.

You forget yourself sometimes and one day you wont be able to go past and get your bike fixed because no one will be near where you live to do it. You bought it cheaper because you saw it at Wiggle, or whatever, then you realised that Wiggle can't do your after sales service, you borrowed an acquaintances time to put it together and you know nothing about bike maintenance.

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Old 04-13-18, 11:56 AM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by 50PlusCycling View Post
Go to Youtube. Bike service is not rocket science. Two ways to earn minimum wage are to flip burgers, or be a bicycle mechanic, because neither requires much skill (I know this from personal experience). If you can cook pasta without burning down your house, you can learn enough about bikes to service one yourself.

The only time I take my bike to a shop is for jobs where I don't have the correct tools. And then, any nearby shop will do.
Neither is laying tile fundamentally. But if you lack the "skill" and/or proper tools/equipment you could end up with something like this:

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Old 04-13-18, 08:22 PM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
I dunno, it was pretty easy when I did it for my fat bike, because no one carried Scott near me. Big box showed up at my door, went together in about 20 minutes, quick touchup on the back derailleur and I was good to go. A bike isn't all that complex mechanically, there isn't a whole heck of a lot to do if you are generally competent working with tools.

Plus it gets quite a few looks and compliments at the trails, because it isn't one of the same three bikes everyone else has, as that is all the local LBS offer.
If you know what you are doing and you are getting something you have ridden or are truly competent in your sizing abilities with just looking at charts then sure go for it. Scott makes some decent bikes (I worked at a Scott dealer for a while and they were always generally decent bikes minus a few here and there) though I never got to try their fat bike.

Most folks out there don't have your skills and in a lot of cases they may not be buying a quality bike from a reputable manufacturer who generally put a decent bike in a box that didn't always need a ton of futzing with. Plus a lot of folks don't have the tools and don't want to get them. Allen wrenches and JIS screwdrivers are handy all over the place (JIS is compatible with Phillips head and won't strip them out very easily, they are a nice precise tool and mine has a magnetic tip making it a joy to use) but say a headset wrench or even simply a pedal wrench or cone wrenches might not see much use outside of a bike and if you are doing a bunch it makes sense but if you are just building one it can be an expensive endeavor to buy that stuff.
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Old 04-14-18, 12:39 PM
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I've never thought about not taking my bike
to a bike shop if I had the need.

"Bike shop" kinda says it all .

Now if you go to the bike shop to get fit, advice & test ride a bike then leave , then go buy it online/elsewhere.
That'll probably invoke bad karma .
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Old 04-14-18, 04:27 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
Neither is laying tile fundamentally. But if you lack the "skill" and/or proper tools/equipment you could end up with something like this:

Also if you earn a reasonably good wage you may simply want to delegate someone else to perform maintenance. Maybe instead of spending hours fiddling with your bike you'd rather spend that time with your family etc. Someone who earns $40 an hour may value an hour of his or her time at $40 and maybe the LBS can do the cycling maintenance for $60 what it would take that person 3 hours to achieve ($120). I do my own maintenance but we all have finite time and managing that finite time will be different depending on that person's circumstances. I love a bargain and hate paying full price for anything so always look for ways of spending less.
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Old 04-14-18, 05:04 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by SEAJAYBIKE View Post
"but that's it really" Oh you've done it now! I generally try to be nice on the forum but now I'm sitting here steaming thinking of all kinds of nasty things to call you. YOU ARE EXACTLY THE PROBLEM. You can justify it all day long, but its still immoral and stealing.

Who do you suppose spent money on those bikes in the shop ready for you to "check out". Who is paying rent, insurance, electrical bill? Who is paying the people who "gave you info about the models"

I hope you understand what an inconsiderate phrase this is.
For your rant to be even mildly close to reality, it would be "stealing" if anyone browsed at more than one store before buying something. If you buy a Specialized after looking at the Trek store, are you an "immoral" monster?
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Old 04-16-18, 03:48 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
With on-line purchases and custom bikes, I usually politely ask them first if they would be willing to work on it. I've never been turned away.

However, be prepared for the invocation of Rule #58.
Or expect an exorbitant building fee.
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Old 04-16-18, 07:18 AM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
Most folks out there don't have your skills and in a lot of cases they may not be buying a quality bike from a reputable manufacturer who generally put a decent bike in a box that didn't always need a ton of futzing with. Plus a lot of folks don't have the tools and don't want to get them. Allen wrenches and JIS screwdrivers are handy all over the place (JIS is compatible with Phillips head and won't strip them out very easily, they are a nice precise tool and mine has a magnetic tip making it a joy to use) but say a headset wrench or even simply a pedal wrench or cone wrenches might not see much use outside of a bike and if you are doing a bunch it makes sense but if you are just building one it can be an expensive endeavor to buy that stuff.
Valid points, but I think at times one can swing the pendulum too far the opposite way in this argument, too. For the type of assembly one is doing on a Trek, Scott, etc being shipped to their home, there really are no special tools needed, just a hex key set and maybe a couple wrenches and screwdrivers. There is really no special skill set required, except some patience.

I'll certainly admit there are plenty of folks who simply don't have the ability or desire to do it themselves, but it really isn't out of the realm of possibility to anyone who can follow some basic instructions and has a set of basic tools that could be found in any home.
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Old 04-16-18, 07:59 AM
  #59  
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I bought a gravel bike last year from BikesDirect. My LBS had no issues with assembling and fine tuning the bike. They charged $60 which is fair, IMO.
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Old 04-16-18, 08:16 AM
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Out of curiosity, when you order a bike online how does it come? Is it completely disassembled or are you just attaching the wheels and adjusting the derailleurs?
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Old 04-16-18, 08:33 AM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by northtexasbiker View Post
Out of curiosity, when you order a bike online how does it come? Is it completely disassembled or are you just attaching the wheels and adjusting the derailleurs?
I pretty much just had to put the handlebars on my Canyon, take off the dork ring, put the wheels on, and set the seat height and position.
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Old 04-16-18, 08:56 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by northtexasbiker View Post
Out of curiosity, when you order a bike online how does it come? Is it completely disassembled or are you just attaching the wheels and adjusting the derailleurs?
I agree.

They send a couple of (inferior) torque keys, but the assembly is so straightforward that my 14 yo old did it by himself. A decent torque wrench is probably a worthwhile investment if you don't already have it.

The tires came mounted to the rims empty but with tubes in boxes as well as valves for setting them up tubeless.

I would advise checking every bolt on the bike. His brake rotors (which they installed) were quite loose.
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Old 04-17-18, 09:04 AM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
Valid points, but I think at times one can swing the pendulum too far the opposite way in this argument, too. For the type of assembly one is doing on a Trek, Scott, etc being shipped to their home, there really are no special tools needed, just a hex key set and maybe a couple wrenches and screwdrivers. There is really no special skill set required, except some patience.

I'll certainly admit there are plenty of folks who simply don't have the ability or desire to do it themselves, but it really isn't out of the realm of possibility to anyone who can follow some basic instructions and has a set of basic tools that could be found in any home.
Yep, I'm sure you've got a bottom bracket tool just laying around in your garage also. Most people don't have bike specific tools due to the infrequency they would use them. I know a bit about bikes, and can go to a workshop where there is the tools but I don't own a bottom bracket tool nor a bottom bracket straightening tool. I probably never will do because I can borrow them, but that's not even the point.

Or are you the local bush mechanic that Jimmy's a few tools together and calls Bob your uncle? If you do things by halves then you end up with a half assed bike. I know a lot of people that would, but none of them are particularly good.

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Old 04-17-18, 09:43 AM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by 50PlusCycling View Post
... Bike service is not rocket science. Two ways to earn minimum wage are to flip burgers, or be a bicycle mechanic, because neither requires much skill (I know this from personal experience). If you can cook pasta without burning down your house...

Hey, thanks. I was a few insults short of today's quota. I feel better now. Want to be my friend?
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Old 04-17-18, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
Yep, I'm sure you've got a bottom bracket tool just laying around in your garage also. Most people don't have bike specific tools due to the infrequency they would use them. I know a bit about bikes, and can go to a workshop where there is the tools but I don't own a bottom bracket tool nor a bottom bracket straightening tool. I probably never will do because I can borrow them, but that's not even the point.
Actually, I do. Most of my bikes just need a big adjustable wrench to work on the bottom bracket. The modern ones need a $15 Park Tool tool, which has paid for itself over and again.

That said, buying a bike new, there should be no reason one needs a bottom bracket tool to set it up and adjust it. They come already installed, didn't (and still haven't) touched the one on my mail order bike.
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Old 04-17-18, 09:48 AM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
Actually, I do. Most of my bikes just need a big adjustable wrench to work on the bottom bracket. The modern ones need a $15 Park Tool tool, which has paid for itself over and again.

That said, buying a bike new, there should be no reason one needs a bottom bracket tool to set it up and adjust it. They come already installed, didn't (and still haven't) touched the one on my mail order bike.
That depends on whether you're buying a bike or a frame in a box.
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Old 04-17-18, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by 1500SLR View Post
That depends on whether you're buying a bike or a frame in a box.
This thread is about a complete bike bought and shipped from an authorized Trek dealer. I.e., bike has already come out of the box at a dealer, given a once over to satisfy dealer regulations against drop shipping online, and packaged back up and sent to you. That is how my Scott came, the only thing other than putting on the handlebars and front tire was tweaking the rear derailleur a bit. Even that was just turning barrel adjusters.

If one is buying a bike as a pile of parts, I fully expect them to either a) know what they are doing and already have the tools to assemble the bike, or b) work in conjunction with the LBS they are going to have assemble it, unless they want to get there and find out half the stuff isn't compatible.

Out of all the available options, one buying random parts online and showing up the LBS for them to put it together would probably be about the most infuriating thing one could do to the mechanic.
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Old 04-17-18, 12:06 PM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by Flip Flop Rider View Post
have a neighbor take it in
Or wear a disguise. Or use a fake name.
__________________
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Two wheels good. Four wheels bad.
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Old 04-17-18, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Nachoman View Post
Or wear a disguise. Or use a fake name.
lol. disguise is good. like bad grandpa
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Old 04-17-18, 12:51 PM
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I was in the same boat, in the end I felt supporting my LBS was more important due to the unofficial perks, like advice, where to ride and an easier haggle factor on accessories etc. The difference in price was not that big in relation to how comfortable I felt when dealing with them in person as well as the ability to test drive several bikes before concluding which was right for me.
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Old 04-17-18, 01:41 PM
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It's not a moral dilemma, but I would try to first ascertain the shop's attitude about working on online-ordered bikes.

The shop offers services, and sets their prices to what they think you'll pay. Your choice if you want to purchase the service. It's just a transaction, no morality if everything is on the up&up. If the shop is even grudging about it, for your bike, I'd take it elsewhere, because the chances are stronger that they'll charge too much, do a poor job or set you back in priority compared to other repairs.

More modern, business oriented shops will work on it just like any other bike if they feel confident in their parts and service.
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Old 04-17-18, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
It's not a moral dilemma, but I would try to first ascertain the shop's attitude about working on online-ordered bikes.

The shop offers services, and sets their prices to what they think you'll pay. Your choice if you want to purchase the service. It's just a transaction, no morality if everything is on the up&up. If the shop is even grudging about it, for your bike, I'd take it elsewhere, because the chances are stronger that they'll charge too much, do a poor job or set you back in priority compared to other repairs.

More modern, business oriented shops will work on it just like any other bike if they feel confident in their parts and service.
I've never met one that didn't. In fact, in one case, my LBS went out of business and the one down the street accepted my patronage just like it was his own. For the record, since the two were only a block apart, I don't think I was the only transfer.
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Old 04-17-18, 11:47 PM
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I've used Velofix and another shop that my work's commuter program subsidizes for service on bikes bought online or gotten elsewhere. Just got my road bike's first tune-up today. Needed to be done because I crashed last Friday and bent my rear derailleur hanger. When I brought the bike in and mentioned the crash, the shop thought they might have to order another hanger, but they straightened it and said it was still in good shape so didn't charge me any more than the typical tune-up price.

I bought that bike at an LBS this past January. The experience was odd in how impersonal it was. The LBS didn't offer me anything with the bike -- neither to try to upsell any accessories nor mentioning any kind of service. I don't know why they were so un-pushy, the only reason I could think of was that I bought a closeout model at a big discount and they didn't see me as a valuable customer to retain. I even mentioned how I was new to road cycling in hopes of getting pointed toward other gear that might make sense to pick up like pedals and shoes (things I much preferred to try in person), but the sales guy didn't offer to have me try any (despite the sandwich board outside the shop advertising an ongoing sale on shoes, even). I might as well have bought online since it felt like the LBS just assumed that I wouldn't come back, and with it being a 45 min drive/1.5 hour ride away, in a self-fulfilling prophecy kind of way I really don't have any reason to go back.
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Old 04-18-18, 06:59 AM
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Originally Posted by AlexanderLS View Post
Don't expect high quality service on bikes you didn't buy from the LBS.
I brought a bike in to LBS that came from BikesDirect. I specifically told the LBS to fix the front derailleur which they kind of did and told them to make sure the rear was good. The rear derailleur came out of the shop needing work and after adjusting the rear derailleur I needed to adjust the front again too.

Despite having bought two bikes from the LBS, they showed me how little they care about my business. I no longer take anything in to the LBS because I have no desire to pay for half assed work.

You can expect the same level of service on a non in house purchased bike as an in house purchase, but not all LBS's are created equal in their quality. Sounds like you just found a bad shop. Even though this board often refers to the LBS as if they are one entity, they aren't. You still need to go through the vetting process just like you would for any service, and even then it's still possible to get poor service from a LBS.
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Old 04-18-18, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by AlexanderLS View Post
Despite having bought two bikes from the LBS, they showed me how little they care about my business. I no longer take anything in to the LBS because I have no desire to pay for half assed work.
I was once offered a job as a mechanic in a bike shop, on nothing other than the fact that I told them I was doing a complete disassemble/rebuild on a touring bike project. Their mechanics had left, and all they had was a guy working part time on the weekends. They were desperate for anyone, even my rather unqualified to touch anything newer than 1997 models self. Of course, they wanted me to forgo my engineering salary for barely above minimum wage hourly work, so I politely declined. It was about that time that I realized not every shop was the mecca they are sometimes made out to be.

Many of the bike shops around me are a revolving door of high school/college kids out to make some cash for the summer. They are probably able to do things quicker than me, but I seriously doubt they do it better or with more attention to detail than I would do to my own bike.
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