Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Rebuilding front wheel into a rear wheel

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Rebuilding front wheel into a rear wheel

Old 04-18-18, 07:17 PM
  #1  
Mars_
Member
Thread Starter
 
Mars_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: nyc
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rebuilding front wheel into a rear wheel

Newbie building a fixie rn so I need some advice, thank you!

So the wheel i currently have, just a regular 700c, is a front wheel. The hub is screwed so it needs to be taken out anyway, and I'm gonna turn it into a rear wheel and buy a trispoke for my front. Any advice on buying a hub and what not, and how to turn it into a rear wheel? Is there a specific type of hub I need for a singlespeed/fixed bike? Thanks a bunch!
Mars_ is offline  
Old 04-18-18, 07:55 PM
  #2  
SkyDog75
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 3,794

Bikes: Bianchi San Mateo and a few others

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 634 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 9 Posts
Converting a front to a rear means swapping out the hub, which will probably also mean swapping out the spokes. So all you're doing is transplanting a rim, at which point it's probably cheaper to just buy a different rear wheel.
SkyDog75 is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 05:21 AM
  #3  
Mars_
Member
Thread Starter
 
Mars_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: nyc
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by SkyDog75
Converting a front to a rear means swapping out the hub, which will probably also mean swapping out the spokes. So all you're doing is transplanting a rim, at which point it's probably cheaper to just buy a different rear wheel.
The wheel needs attention anyway, and itís actually cheaper for me to just buy a hub and new spokes for it than buying a new wheel
Mars_ is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 06:07 AM
  #4  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 24,358

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 149 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3312 Post(s)
Liked 2,794 Times in 1,612 Posts
Unless it's an exceptionally fancy rim, it's probably cheaper to replace the whole wheel.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 07:22 AM
  #5  
Mars_
Member
Thread Starter
 
Mars_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: nyc
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson
Unless it's an exceptionally fancy rim, it's probably cheaper to replace the whole wheel.
All the 700c deep v rear wheels Iíve looked at are $100 or over... Buying a hub and spokes is like half that...

But then again I donít exactly know what type of hubs to look for because no one is answering my question
Mars_ is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 07:39 AM
  #6  
Ironfish653
Dirty Heathen
 
Ironfish653's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: MC-778, 6250 fsw
Posts: 2,047

Bikes: 1997 Cannondale, 1976 Bridgestone, 1998 SoftRide, 1989 Klein, 1989 Black Lightning #0033

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 822 Post(s)
Liked 803 Times in 474 Posts
If you're building a rear wheel for a fixie, you'll need a fixed-gear, or 'track' hub. You can also get a 'flip-flop' hub, which has a fixed cog on one side and can fit a single-speed freewheel on the other. You can switch between fixed-gear or freewheel by flipping the wheel around.

Don't know what kind of rim you're trying to use, but you can get a F/R wheelset from Pure Cycles for $100. 40mm 'deep-V' rims, too.
https://www.purecycles.com/collectio...ries/wheelsets

They'll sell you a hub, too, but WRT spoke length, we need to know your rim section depth, hub flange diameter, and intended lacing pattern.
Ironfish653 is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 08:57 AM
  #7  
SquidPuppet
Calamari Marionette Ph.D
 
SquidPuppet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Coeur d' Alene
Posts: 7,862

Bikes: 3 Chinese Gas Pipe Nerdcycles and 2 Chicago Electroforged Boat Anchors

Mentioned: 75 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2357 Post(s)
Liked 31 Times in 25 Posts
Originally Posted by Mars_
All the 700c deep v rear wheels Iíve looked at are $100 or over... Buying a hub and spokes is like half that...

But then again I donít exactly know what type of hubs to look for because no one is answering my question

Do you know how to build wheels? If not, you'll pay around $50.00 for someone to assemble the hew hub and spokes to your old rim.
SquidPuppet is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 09:07 AM
  #8  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,346 Times in 853 Posts
good spokes are not cheap..
fietsbob is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 09:10 AM
  #9  
SkyDog75
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 3,794

Bikes: Bianchi San Mateo and a few others

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 634 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by Mars_
But then again I don’t exactly know what type of hubs to look for...
You'll need a fixed gear or track hub, like the rears listed HERE on Universal Cycles' web site. Or a flip-flop hub that can take a freewheel on one site and fixed cog on the other. You'll need one with the same number of spoke holes as the rim you intend to use, and the same OLD (Over Locknut Distance, or width) as your frame's dropouts.

Well, the hub's OLD might not have to match the frame's dropout width... Depending on what kind of frame you have and its age, your dropouts are likely to be spaced at 120, 126, 130, or 135 mm. Ideally your new hub will match the frame, but there are some ways you can make mismatched parts work. If your new hub is narrower than the frame spacing, you can add spacers (which might require a longer axle). If your new hub is wider than your frame's dropouts, you might be able to cold set (bend) the frame -- if it's steel -- to accept the new hub. If it's not a big difference, you may be able to just spread the dropouts a little bit by hand while installing the wheel, even though that's not ideal.

Once you have your rim and hub in hand, you'll need to take measurements to buy spokes that are the right length. You'll need to know the ERD (Effective Rim Diameter) of the rim, as well as a number of measurements re: the hub flange diameter and position. You can take those measurements and plug them into a spoke calculator like SpoCalc, along with your desired spoke pattern, to determine the spoke lengths you'll need to buy. Note "lengths" is plural since rear wheels are often dished or offset to one side to accommodate the sprocket(s). I like the EDD spoke calculator and the site has a good "how to measure" page HERE.

Now that you've got all the parts, you need to assemble the wheel. Sheldon Brown's site has a good tutorial on wheelbulding HERE. You'll need a spoke wrench, but those are inexpensive. You'd also ideally have a truing stand and dishing gauge as well as maybe a tensiometer to measure spoke tension, but you can do without those in a pinch. You can use your bike's frame or fork, turned upside-down as a truing stand, albeit an inconvenient one.

Last edited by SkyDog75; 04-19-18 at 09:16 AM.
SkyDog75 is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 09:23 AM
  #10  
1500SLR
Banned.
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 443

Bikes: Trek 1500 SLR DI2 Giant Kronos SRAM Rival

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 301 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Unless you know how to build a wheel with spokes that suit your weight in a reliable way (yes spoke patterns matter it adds rigidity to the wheel) i'd suggest don't do it. My Trek has a kind of unique set of spokes on it, but the problem is that these rims are known to break really easily and should probably be respoked. You have to want to know what you're doing. Lacing spokes is a science.

The science of having to put together a bike properly is lost on a lot of fixie riders and the other thing. Riding deep section wheels itself is an art form. I sincerely hope you've considered all of the ramifications of living with deep section wheels, otherwise with the first gust of wind your bicycle wheels will turn into an airplane engine and you'll be in the middle of the road. If you're lucky you wont get squashed by a truck.

No one really rides straight threaded spokes anymore but here you go.


Last edited by 1500SLR; 04-19-18 at 09:45 AM.
1500SLR is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 10:10 AM
  #11  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 11,944

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3725 Post(s)
Liked 3,168 Times in 2,112 Posts
If your front hub isn't working it sounds like you have a brokie not a fixie. You need to fixie your brokie so you can ride it.

As others have suggested I would get a pre-built wheel unless you have built wheels which judging from your post you have not. It will be way easier and less hassle and less cost with factoring in parts and labor.

Also why a tri-spoke? What gains will you get from spend a ridiculous amount of money for a non-properly spoked wheel that will probably weigh a bunch and not really give you much in gains unless you are super aero and going super fast all the time (which is not practical except for racing)? They can sort of look good on an aero carbon frame but only as a complete aero package and not with a cheap fixed gear wheel in the back on some steel or online type "fixie" aluminum frame.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 10:32 AM
  #12  
clasher
Senior Member
 
clasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 2,731
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 227 Post(s)
Liked 144 Times in 100 Posts
You can buy a cheap fixed rear hub on ebay, shipped from China for 30 or 40$ depending on the brand. Novatec, formula and joytec all make basic ones... make sure get the right spoke count. This wheelbuilding book is worth the 12$ it'll teach you how to measure everything and it has a good spoke length calculator. If you can get to a bike co-op they might have used hubs that would work and might be able to show how to build a wheel. Our local co-op has used spokes that are cheap too. I like building wheels but it's not something that saves me a lot of money if I put a price on my time.
clasher is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 10:34 AM
  #13  
Marcus_Ti
FLIR Kitten to 0.05C
 
Marcus_Ti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 5,331

Bikes: Roadie: Seven Axiom Race Ti w/Chorus 11s. CX/Adventure: Carver Gravel Grinder w/ Di2

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2349 Post(s)
Liked 406 Times in 254 Posts
Originally Posted by Mars_
All the 700c deep v rear wheels I’ve looked at are $100 or over... Buying a hub and spokes is like half that...

But then again I don’t exactly know what type of hubs to look for because no one is answering my question

No...you can't get a reputable front hub (new) for $50USD except on steep-and-cheap sales. Spokes nipples and rim tape will be $50USD by themselves easy.
Marcus_Ti is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 03:43 PM
  #14  
Mars_
Member
Thread Starter
 
Mars_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: nyc
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I was looking at rear hubs in general, didn’t know I needed a track or a flip flop hub, and needed to look into specific patterns for be spokes and what not. I’ll look into buying a new wheel but I would’ve rathered just reusing the one I have.

Thank you guys for the advice n what not!
Mars_ is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 04:10 PM
  #15  
GuessWhoCycling
Banned.
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 398
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I buy my spokes from prowheelbuilder. They have plenty of spokes I could not find in local shops because of limited supply.

I also built my wheels learning thru reading sheldon brown's section on wheels. Not rocket science and if you have a little mechanical ability, it's not hard.

Not sure about track hubs etc but basic hubs take 2 different lengths of spokes to compensate for the gear/gears. So be sure to find out if you need two different lengths, drive side and non drive side.


prowheelbuilder.com

Not that hard. I've built about 10 wheels for my fleet of bikes including a tandem wheel. Just takes some common sense and a little TLC.

Deep V 30 mm deep. I see plenty of fixies riders using Deep V's.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
whhel.JPG (36.7 KB, 42 views)
GuessWhoCycling is offline  
Old 04-19-18, 04:13 PM
  #16  
fietsbob
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,599

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,346 Times in 853 Posts
Maybe a Balance bike ? front wheel on both ends , and no drivetrain? 2nd childhood..
fietsbob is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
practical
Bicycle Mechanics
12
11-11-16 04:14 PM
commander_clark
Bicycle Mechanics
2
05-26-14 03:59 PM
tsappenfield
Classic & Vintage
4
07-02-11 10:20 PM
StalkerZERO
Road Cycling
1
08-12-10 05:55 PM
joe_mn
Bicycle Mechanics
1
05-19-10 07:36 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.