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Is it that I am just Weak? (2.1" Tires)

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Is it that I am just Weak? (2.1" Tires)

Old 05-04-18, 07:55 AM
  #1  
MY3blKAHT
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Is it that I am just Weak? (2.1" Tires)

I recently moved to the suburbs and got the bicycle bug again. I used to own (Cannondale Quick SL 1 Bike - 2013) rei.com/product/844758/cannondale-quick-sl-1-bike-2013 which I really liked and it was decent, at least to what I understood about bikes to take me on paved roads along the ocean.

4 years later, my friend gets himself a (Diamondback Haanjo EXP Carbon Bike - 2017) rei.com/product/108760/diamondback-haanjo-exp-carbon-bike-2017 and this bike is just very cool looking. Friend rides it on a wooden boardwalk mostly and loves it. What do I do? I follow and buy the same bike.

Now, here is my concern.
I took it on a paved road in my town where roads are somewhat up and down. There is a bit elevation but to me, someone who is not doing this every day, it is just hard. I struggle when going even on minor uphills. So my question ... is it just a huge difference in how much power the new bike need versus the old one I had? Having such wide tires makes it twice as hard to ride? assuming I am riding on paved roads.

I plan to possibly ride 70-80% of time on paved roads and only 20-30% on off road, but nothing crazy like downhill at high speeds. Is this too much of a bike for me to enjoy? Or suck it up and build some muscle? :-)

As an alternative, I can easily switch now to a (Cannondale Quick Disc 1 Bike) rei.com/product/108568/cannondale-quick-disc-1-bike

Thank you.
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Old 05-04-18, 08:10 AM
  #2  
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The tires look knobby on the diamondback. Slick tires will make the most difference.
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Old 05-04-18, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by katsup View Post
The tires look knobby on the diamondback. Slick tires will make the most difference.
Yep. The question is, after such a long time off the bike, the difficulty is mostly due to strength or is it such a big difference between these tires and narrower tires that you'd find on a hybrid bike?
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Old 05-04-18, 08:27 AM
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Unless you stayed in shape via other means you've absolutely have lost fitness, and even then you've lost biking fitness. The tires aren't the only thing making it difficult if that's your question.
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Old 05-04-18, 08:58 AM
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Focus on the motor, not the bike. Changes in bike and components "could" make some differences but the biggest influence on a bike and its performance is the one driving it forward.

I can tell a huge difference just being off the bike several weeks.
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Old 05-04-18, 09:05 AM
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You don't need a new bike unless you like spending money, but road friendly tires may be something you would want even if you were in biking shape. Especially if you are 70-80% on road vs 20-30 off road.
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Old 05-04-18, 09:18 AM
  #7  
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Originally Posted by MY3blKAHT View Post
Yep. The question is, after such a long time off the bike, the difficulty is mostly due to strength or is it such a big difference between these tires and narrower tires that you'd find on a hybrid bike?
Even if you've stayed generally in shape while off the bike, biking requires specific muscles used in a specific way. If you haven't be working those leg muscles on a stationary bike, then you'd just out of biking shape.

The good news is that if you were in biking shape previously, your body should get back into biking shape pretty quick. It's not like you're Jaba The Hutt trying to run a marathon. Your body will recover quickly. And on knobbie tires you'll really work those muscles.

Best bet is to keep riding the knobbies for a month. Use higher gears that will make your body work more for a while. Both things will make it harder to ride, but that's better for the workout. And then once you have your biking legs back under you (which I stress will take a couple weeks...not the whole summer or years or anything) switch to a smoother thinner tire and go back to using the lower gears as normal. You'll feel like you're in a race car compared to how you feel right now.
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Old 05-04-18, 09:40 AM
  #8  
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Originally Posted by MY3blKAHT View Post
Now, here is my concern.
I took it on a paved road in my town where roads are somewhat up and down. There is a bit elevation but to me, someone who is not doing this every day, it is just hard. I struggle when going even on minor uphills. So my question ... is it just a huge difference in how much power the new bike need versus the old one I had? Having such wide tires makes it twice as hard to ride?
The tires don't make that much difference when you're going slowly up a hill. I think you're just out of shape. You'll probably improve rapidly in the next month if you ride everyday or every other day.

Having said that, those tires (Schwalbe Smart Sams) are somewhat slow for riding on the road. At some point I'd look for lighter, less knobby, more road oriented tires, but don't be in a hurry.

And I, personally, would much rather have your Haanjo Exp than a Cannondale Quick.
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Old 05-04-18, 09:45 AM
  #9  
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4 years off the bike and one ride? I say conditioning. My first ride this year on a known 16 mile route was a few min slower than what I was doing at the end of last season, I can't imagine how it'd look after 4 years. I've got a bike with 23mm tires and one with 35mm, the difference between them is fairly negligible. And, FWIW, I far prefer my Mazama (gravel/adventure like your bike) over my road only bike.

That said, knobby tires if you are mostly on road don't help. In a 650b, you may want to try something like the Schwalbe Big Apple or the Clement USH. Both should keep the bike happy on road and allow you to do any sort of off roading you would reasonably be doing on a bike like that.
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Old 05-04-18, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
4 years off the bike and one ride? I say conditioning. My first ride this year on a known 16 mile route was a few min slower than what I was doing at the end of last season, I can't imagine how it'd look after 4 years. I've got a bike with 23mm tires and one with 35mm, the difference between them is fairly negligible. And, FWIW, I far prefer my Mazama (gravel/adventure like your bike) over my road only bike.

That said, knobby tires if you are mostly on road don't help. In a 650b, you may want to try something like the Schwalbe Big Apple or the Clement USH. Both should keep the bike happy on road and allow you to do any sort of off roading you would reasonably be doing on a bike like that.
Thanks,
So, changing tires, and I notice there is not a whole lot of options with 650cc wheel. So if I am now changing things on the bike, why not just get a Cannondale Quick Disc 1 Bike ? Cheaper, uses a more popular wheel size, easier to find upgrades for it and overall cheaper bike?

Again, my knowledge on bikes is absolute 0. I ride casually. Once in a while I may go off road. Very rarely steep downhill roads. Possibly never :-) I'd love to have a bike that's easily up-gradable if need be. So unless this Diamondback Haanjo EXP Carbon Bike is so crazy great that it makes sense to just change the wheel/tire to make it easier but definitely keep the bike for all it's other quality parts, I may think about getting a different bike?

P.S. Having sifters at end of the handle bars is strange and something I probably need to get used to.
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Old 05-04-18, 10:34 AM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by MY3blKAHT View Post
Thanks,
So, changing tires, and I notice there is not a whole lot of options with 650cc wheel. So if I am now changing things on the bike, why not just get a Cannondale Quick Disc 1 Bike ? Cheaper, uses a more popular wheel size, easier to find upgrades for it and overall cheaper bike?

Again, my knowledge on bikes is absolute 0. I ride casually. Once in a while I may go off road. Very rarely steep downhill roads. Possibly never :-) I'd love to have a bike that's easily up-gradable if need be. So unless this Diamondback Haanjo EXP Carbon Bike is so crazy great that it makes sense to just change the wheel/tire to make it easier but definitely keep the bike for all it's other quality parts, I may think about getting a different bike?

P.S. Having sifters at end of the handle bars is strange and something I probably need to get used to.
They're two completely different bikes. You need to determine what you are going to do with them and which is more suited for your needs. One is a flat bar narrower tire, the other a drop bar bike with clearance for 2" tires. Either is suitable for your needs, however don;t think you are just going to get on the other bike and be considerably faster.

As far as "changing things", tires aren't really that big of a change, to me it is along the lines of saddle and pedals in setting any new to you bike up how you want it.
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Old 05-04-18, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
They're two completely different bikes. You need to determine what you are going to do with them and which is more suited for your needs. One is a flat bar narrower tire, the other a drop bar bike with clearance for 2" tires. Either is suitable for your needs, however don;t think you are just going to get on the other bike and be considerably faster.

As far as "changing things", tires aren't really that big of a change, to me it is along the lines of saddle and pedals in setting any new to you bike up how you want it.
So, if you were in my shoes ... choosing between Diamondback Haanjo EXP Carbon Bike - 2017 VS Cannondale Quick Disc 1 Bike ... or maybe another bike REI sells. Price doesn't matter. 80% road, 20% light off road. Area is somewhat hilly (not to overemphasize, for me it's hilly, for someone like you it's flat). Riding 2-3 times a week less than 10 miles. More for enjoyment rather than pursuing athletic goals. Want to be able to upgrade certain parts if I feel the need in the future. Your thoughts?
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Old 05-04-18, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by MY3blKAHT View Post
So, if you were in my shoes ... choosing between Diamondback Haanjo EXP Carbon Bike - 2017 VS Cannondale Quick Disc 1 Bike ... or maybe another bike REI sells. Price doesn't matter. 80% road, 20% light off road. Area is somewhat hilly (not to overemphasize, for me it's hilly, for someone like you it's flat). Riding 2-3 times a week less than 10 miles. More for enjoyment rather than pursuing athletic goals. Want to be able to upgrade certain parts if I feel the need in the future. Your thoughts?
My preference is towards the DB, but that is simply MY preference.

This is the newer version of my bike: https://www.rei.com/product/122463/c...es-adv-31-bike. They went from a triple to a double and from 700 to 650 from last year to this year, but I'd buy it again. Thinking about getting rid of my road bike, I simply don't ride it, this runs just fine on the road with the 35mm Clement USH.
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Old 05-04-18, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
My preference is towards the DB, but that is simply MY preference.

This is the newer version of my bike: Co-op Cycles ADV 3.1 Bike, They went from a triple to a double and from 700 to 650 from last year to this year, but I'd buy it again. Thinking about getting rid of my road bike, I simply don't ride it, this runs just fine on the road with the 35mm Clement USH.
hmm, looks like a nice bike. How does it compare to the DB? It is much heavier and somewhat cheaper.
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Old 05-04-18, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by MY3blKAHT View Post
hmm, looks like a nice bike. How does it compare to the DB? It is much heavier and somewhat cheaper.
No idea, I've never ridden the DB. My preference is simply towards that style, after buying and riding this bike.

If you are shopping at REI they likely have a wide selection of bikes sitting on the floor. The best advice I can give is for you to go in and test ride a few, especially if you are returning the DB and buying a different one. What I personally like does not help you, you are likely proportioned much differently and doing a different style of riding than me, you need some time on bikes making up your own mind.

Good luck with the search
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Old 05-04-18, 11:54 AM
  #16  
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That is one heck of a bike to be riding casually, kind of like driving a lifted Wrangler to the mall.

90% of your trouble sounds like being out of shape. Just keep at it and you'll get better. The other 10% come from the wheels that come on the Haanjo - too knobby, too wide, and probably too low-pressure for efficient road use. You could just try different, thinner, smoother, higher-PSI tires (<35mm, fewer knobs, 60+PSI).
Think about how much you enjoy riding and what your future wants might be (but don't overthink) and let that guide your decision on which bike to get. Will you want to ride longer? Faster?
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Old 05-04-18, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by MY3blKAHT View Post
I notice there is not a whole lot of options with 650cc wheel...
There are lots of options out there in your bikeís 650b size. Along with being a niche tire for road and gravel bikes, itís popular size for mountain bike tires.

Donít confuse your bikeís tire size with 650c, which is a different, incompatible size. 650c is generally only used on triathlon bikes and road bikes for smaller riders. Thereís not much of a tire selection in 650c, and theyíre generally going to be skinny road tires.

Originally Posted by MY3blKAHT View Post
So if I am now changing things on the bike, why not just get a Cannondale Quick Disc 1 Bike ? Cheaper, uses a more popular wheel size, easier to find upgrades for it and overall cheaper bike?
Your Haanjo is a nice bike, and thereís nothing on it that isnít a common standard. Either bike will be just as easy to customize or upgrade.

Tire changes are trivial and youíll end up changing tires sooner or later, no matter which bike you go with.

Those things aside, itís really just a matter of preference and cost, both of which are your call.

Last edited by SkyDog75; 05-04-18 at 12:43 PM.
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Old 05-04-18, 01:26 PM
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Knobbies will make the vibration more but won't cut the speed much. Wider tires are more traction and can actually be faster so long as you are in shape enough. 4 years is a long time, and your past rides may not have been in such hilly locale.
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Old 05-05-18, 04:45 AM
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From experience, building strength and tires. Tires alone can be worth 1-2 mph. The rest, just keep riding. I have a hill that once was a struggle in the 34-28 combination. Nowadays I hold it reasonably in 34-21. The only difference is my ability to climb. Same bike, still the same tires. A few kg lighter bike is nice, but in the end work on yourself and you will find your current bike can handle it just fine.
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Old 05-06-18, 02:54 PM
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Well, yesterday decided to take my wife's bike (Bianchi, straight bar) on the same route as I did with the Diamondback Haanjo EXP ... yep, it's me. :-) I think I got more tired on her bike because it was also a bit small for me and my posture was not as good as when I was on the Haanjo. Got to work on those muscles I guess. I do sometimes feel like this bike is an overkill for me, we'll see.

If I did decide to go for something lower key and more for on the road style with handlebars I am more used to, I was looking into these;
Co-op Cycles CTY 2.2 Bike
or
Cannondale Quick Disc 1

any thoughts on these two?


Originally Posted by Oneder View Post
Knobbies will make the vibration more but won't cut the speed much. Wider tires are more traction and can actually be faster so long as you are in shape enough. 4 years is a long time, and your past rides may not have been in such hilly locale.
Originally Posted by SkyDog75 View Post


There are lots of options out there in your bikeís 650b size. Along with being a niche tire for road and gravel bikes, itís popular size for mountain bike tires.

Donít confuse your bikeís tire size with 650c, which is a different, incompatible size. 650c is generally only used on triathlon bikes and road bikes for smaller riders. Thereís not much of a tire selection in 650c, and theyíre generally going to be skinny road tires.



Your Haanjo is a nice bike, and thereís nothing on it that isnít a common standard. Either bike will be just as easy to customize or upgrade.

Tire changes are trivial and youíll end up changing tires sooner or later, no matter which bike you go with.

Those things aside, itís really just a matter of preference and cost, both of which are your call.
Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
No idea, I've never ridden the DB. My preference is simply towards that style, after buying and riding this bike.

If you are shopping at REI they likely have a wide selection of bikes sitting on the floor. The best advice I can give is for you to go in and test ride a few, especially if you are returning the DB and buying a different one. What I personally like does not help you, you are likely proportioned much differently and doing a different style of riding than me, you need some time on bikes making up your own mind.

Good luck with the search
Originally Posted by autonomy View Post
That is one heck of a bike to be riding casually, kind of like driving a lifted Wrangler to the mall.

90% of your trouble sounds like being out of shape. Just keep at it and you'll get better. The other 10% come from the wheels that come on the Haanjo - too knobby, too wide, and probably too low-pressure for efficient road use. You could just try different, thinner, smoother, higher-PSI tires (<35mm, fewer knobs, 60+PSI).
Think about how much you enjoy riding and what your future wants might be (but don't overthink) and let that guide your decision on which bike to get. Will you want to ride longer? Faster?
Originally Posted by FlMTNdude View Post
From experience, building strength and tires. Tires alone can be worth 1-2 mph. The rest, just keep riding. I have a hill that once was a struggle in the 34-28 combination. Nowadays I hold it reasonably in 34-21. The only difference is my ability to climb. Same bike, still the same tires. A few kg lighter bike is nice, but in the end work on yourself and you will find your current bike can handle it just fine.
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Old 05-06-18, 04:00 PM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by WNCGoater View Post
Focus on the motor, not the bike..
^This.
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Old 05-06-18, 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by MY3blKAHT View Post
Well, yesterday decided to take my wife's bike (Bianchi, straight bar) on the same route as I did with the Diamondback Haanjo EXP ... yep, it's me. :-) I think I got more tired on her bike because it was also a bit small for me and my posture was not as good as when I was on the Haanjo. Got to work on those muscles I guess. I do sometimes feel like this bike is an overkill for me, we'll see.

If I did decide to go for something lower key and more for on the road style with handlebars I am more used to, I was looking into these;
Co-op Cycles CTY 2.2 Bike
or
Cannondale Quick Disc 1

any thoughts on these two?
The C'dale is the nicer bike. I wouldn't want a front shock fork for what you'redoing. Don't have a single front shock fork, never encountered a non-MTB environment I wish I had one.

Again though, go to REI and test ride them. What you feel is far more important than what we feel, it is your butt on the seat.
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Old 05-07-18, 10:17 AM
  #23  
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Your problem is your bike. Send it to me for disposal.
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Old 05-07-18, 02:04 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
And, FWIW, I far prefer my Mazama (gravel/adventure like your bike) over my road only bike.
+1
My Mazama is my favorite, I have finally got the set up dialed in with a Brooks Imperial, Trekking bars, & Continental SpeedRide tires 700x42
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