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Platform Pedals did not work out

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Platform Pedals did not work out

Old 05-15-18, 08:04 PM
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Platform Pedals did not work out

I was following the platform pedal thread and decided on just getting the Nashbar platform pedals that were linked in the thread:

https://www.bikenashbar.com/cycling/...-pedals-nb-dpp

I was changing from these:

https://www.rei.com/product/668198/s...324-spd-pedals

because I rarely clip in anymore and I always had to search for the non-clip side when starting. But with the new Nashbar pedals I have found that in normal easy pedaling that the cassette gets ahead of my pedaling and I get a slight jerk at the top of pedal rotation to engage the gears again. I can shift into a lower gear to stop this but I never had this feeling in the old pedals. I was thinking that maybe I am getting no backward force on the pedal since I have only the sandpaper surface. And with the old pedals the metal protrusions are stickier. Or maybe it is the light weight of the new pedal and no inertia is keeping the chain tight with the cassette. Any ideas on what is happening?

Thanks, Tom

Last edited by themp; 05-15-18 at 09:23 PM.
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Old 05-15-18, 09:05 PM
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Sounds like a sticky freewheel/freehub body to me. Not likely anything to do with the pedals
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Old 05-15-18, 09:13 PM
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Originally Posted by themp
I was following the platform pedal thread and decided on just getting the Nashbar platform pedals that was linked in the thread:

https://www.bikenashbar.com/cycling/...-pedals-nb-dpp

I was changing from these:

https://www.rei.com/product/668198/s...324-spd-pedals

because I rarely clip in anymore and I always had to search for the non-clip side when starting. But with the new Nashbar pedals I have found that in normal easy pedaling that the cassette gets ahead of my pedaling and I get a slight jerk at the top of pedal rotation to engage the gears again. I can shift into a lower gear to stop this but I never had this feeling in the old pedals. I was thinking that maybe I am getting no backward force on the pedal since I have only the sandpaper surface. And with the old pedals the metal protrusions are stickier. Or maybe it is the light weight of the new pedal and no inertia is keeping the chain tight with the cassette. Any ideas on what is happening?

Thanks, Tom

For platform pedals to shine as an alternative to toe-clips or cleats, you will want both a wide platform and screw in pins that grip to the bottom of your shoe.


Those Nashbar pedals are lacking both of these qualities.
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Old 05-16-18, 07:54 AM
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I have had good luck w Crank Brothers Stamp3 & the Amazon knock offs of Chester's. Both have large platform & good gripping pins.
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Old 05-16-18, 08:24 AM
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Agree with [MENTION=171383]agmetal[/MENTION], doesn't sound like a pedal issue to me.
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Old 05-16-18, 08:25 AM
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Both of these are fantastic flat pedals that provide the screw in pins and big surface area. I own them both and may lean slightly to the VP.

VP Components VP-001 pedals

Wellgo MG-1 pedals
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Old 05-16-18, 09:02 AM
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Oh well .. not my problem..

you can sort it out , or just post here and watch it go on...








...

Last edited by fietsbob; 05-21-18 at 11:50 AM.
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Old 05-16-18, 11:04 AM
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Could be that your pedalling has gotten choppier with the flat pedals, too.
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Old 05-16-18, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by bcpriess
Both of these are fantastic flat pedals that provide the screw in pins and big surface area. I own them both and may lean slightly to the VP.

VP Components VP-001 pedals

Wellgo MG-1 pedals
Another (expensive) pedal that I've found both grippy and comfortable like if you like a really big platform:
https://www.amazon.com/DMR-Vault-Bre...dp/B00MN2ESSI/

If you're price conscious the wellgo's at $38 or the vp's at $45 are certainly good and cheaper options.
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Old 05-16-18, 01:09 PM
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I''m guessing two things are happening here. The cassette isn't entirely free-running. Perhaps some oil or attention will help. And you are not pedaling "through; the top/bottom of the pedal stroke. (If you tried this on a fix gear with a slack chain, you would get a rude awakening. Back before dinosaurs, we used to ride fix gear to teach our legs to spin full circles all the time, all day.)

Ben
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Old 05-16-18, 01:14 PM
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders
For platform pedals to shine as an alternative to toe-clips or cleats, you will want both a wide platform and screw in pins that grip to the bottom of your shoe.


Those Nashbar pedals are lacking both of these qualities.
I use these pedals and disagree entirely.

They grip just fine provided your shoes have any tread on them at all. I can stand on one pedal with my foot angled 45 degrees and I don't slip down. They hold like glue. It's not a sandpaper topping. It's rougher than that. It's a deep plastic rough grip surface. It's not like the traction treads you see on stairs sometimes.

It's also a pretty large surface area. It's plenty for my size 12 wide foot.
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Old 05-16-18, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Skipjacks
I use these pedals and disagree entirely.

They grip just fine provided your shoes have any tread on them at all. I can stand on one pedal with my foot angled 45 degrees and I don't slip down. They hold like glue. It's not a sandpaper topping. It's rougher than that. It's a deep plastic rough grip surface. It's not like the traction treads you see on stairs sometimes.

It's also a pretty large surface area. It's plenty for my size 12 wide foot.
What are the dimensions of that pedal?


I recently installed Shimano XT pedals(size Large) on my bike, and the difference is quite noticeable when riding up hills.


The Shimano XT pedals I have are 115 wide by 110 long and my old pedals most people probably would have thought of as large, were probably something like 100mm wide by 95mm long.
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Old 05-16-18, 09:24 PM
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More likely cause is something peculiar in the pedal stroke. If so, a few hours of riding with the platforms would probably line it out.
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Old 05-16-18, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Skipjacks
I use these pedals and disagree entirely.

They grip just fine provided your shoes have any tread on them at all. I can stand on one pedal with my foot angled 45 degrees and I don't slip down. They hold like glue. It's not a sandpaper topping. It's rougher than that. It's a deep plastic rough grip surface. It's not like the traction treads you see on stairs sometimes.

It's also a pretty large surface area. It's plenty for my size 12 wide foot.
You've obviously never refinished hardwood floors if you think the grip tape on those pedals is rougher than all sandpaper.
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Old 05-16-18, 10:07 PM
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My favorite pedals are Cult Daks. Kinda odd that they take a 17mm for install/removal, but no biggie. Grip a pair of Vans quite well.

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Old 05-16-18, 11:36 PM
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Probably just a pedaling technique thing.

After riding mostly my road bike for two months with new-to-me Look pedals, I had a few miles of getting reacquainted with my hybrid and flat pedals. I kept trying to spin with the same technique. Doesn't work. I'd get that herky-jerky motion in the drivetrain where I'd leave some slack then suddenly re-engage on the downstroke and jerk the chain taut again.

That didn't take long to smooth out. Just had to consciously remind myself how to pedal smoothly at around 70-80 rpm. My natural cadence with clipless is 90 rpm.

Worst part was at a quiet residential stop sign when I tried to unclip and panicked when I didn't feel that reassuring *click!*. I started to topple over, then jerked my foot free of the non-existent retention -- and just caught myself before falling. All while a neighbor was waiting behind me at the intersection. Probably thought I was nuts when I started laughing and waved him on ahead while I regained my composure.
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Old 05-17-18, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets
You've obviously never refinished hardwood floors if you think the grip tape on those pedals is rougher than all sandpaper.
The grip tape on those pedals is grippier than sandpaper.

I can't say it any clearer.

It's NOT sandpaper with little bumps of sand causing the roughness. It's more like waves of jagged plastic lines.

Again, it supports my entire 220 lbs on 1 foot with the pedal angled at 45 degrees with no slipping at all.
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Old 05-17-18, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Skipjacks
The grip tape on those pedals is grippier than sandpaper.

I can't say it any clearer.

It's NOT sandpaper with little bumps of sand causing the roughness. It's more like waves of jagged plastic lines.

Again, it supports my entire 220 lbs on 1 foot with the pedal angled at 45 degrees with no slipping at all.
Pretty sure it's just grip tape as used on skateboards. The primary difference between it and sandpaper you may be familiar with is that the backing film is plastic instead of paper.

If you put 36 grit sandpaper on your pedals you'd likely get better grip. It wouldn't wear as long as grip tape, however.

I've been riding skateboards since the 70s and dealt with a LOT of griptape. I'd still call it a variety of sandpaper, one with a plastic substrate and adhesive backing.

The grip of some 36 grit is amazing. Also tends to remove a little more skin than grip tape, though


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Old 05-17-18, 09:22 AM
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Another difference is the abrasives in grip tape are more jagged, which can supply a little more grip for a given particle size. Downside of that particle shape is that they clog more readily. If you ever ride your pedals in muddy conditions and the mud dries on, you'll likely want to break out the wire brush. If it gets really bad, you can get out the hair dryer to remove your old grip tape, run down to your nearest skateboard shop for some fresh grip.
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Old 05-17-18, 09:28 AM
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I'm a mini-clip guy. not for everyone, but they suit me








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Old 05-17-18, 02:22 PM
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Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets
Pretty sure it's just grip tape as used on skateboards. The primary difference between it and sandpaper you may be familiar with is that the backing film is plastic instead of paper.

If you put 36 grit sandpaper on your pedals you'd likely get better grip. It wouldn't wear as long as grip tape, however.

I've been riding skateboards since the 70s and dealt with a LOT of griptape. I'd still call it a variety of sandpaper, one with a plastic substrate and adhesive backing.

The grip of some 36 grit is amazing. Also tends to remove a little more skin than grip tape, though

Yeah...it's not skateboard grip tape. I know what that grip tape is. These pedals use something different.

It's better than grip tape because the grooving in it is much deeper, letting the rubber of your shoes sink in more.

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Old 05-17-18, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets
Another difference is the abrasives in grip tape are more jagged, which can supply a little more grip for a given particle size. Downside of that particle shape is that they clog more readily. If you ever ride your pedals in muddy conditions and the mud dries on, you'll likely want to break out the wire brush. If it gets really bad, you can get out the hair dryer to remove your old grip tape, run down to your nearest skateboard shop for some fresh grip.
Not being grip tape, these peddals do well in mud.

I've had them muddy and they do just fine. The elevated areas aren't even so when mud cakes in it doesn't glaze over and form a flat surface. There are still protrusions that stick up and grab your shoes.

Muddy isn't as good as dry, obviously. (Wet is just as good as dry. Muddy it a little degraded) but they still grip fine when caked in mud.

I've had those peddals muddy more than a few times and I never felt like they lost all their grip.

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Old 05-17-18, 06:06 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6
I'm a mini-clip guy. not for everyone, but they suit me









I had toe clips like those on my old pedals and I thought they were pretty good, but when I changed over to the much larger platform Shimano XT pedals, I found I was able to transmit noticeably more force every pedal stroke.


Now maybe my feet were too long for the toe clips, it is hard to tell, perhaps I just need to have my foot a half inch further forward, which the toe clips prevented.


Either way, I now won't ever be returning to toe clips.
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Old 05-17-18, 07:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Skipjacks
Not being grip tape, these peddals do well in mud.

I've had them muddy and they do just fine. The elevated areas aren't even so when mud cakes in it doesn't glaze over and form a flat surface. There are still protrusions that stick up and grab your shoes.

Muddy isn't as good as dry, obviously. (Wet is just as good as dry. Muddy it a little degraded) but they still grip fine when caked in mud.

I've had those peddals muddy more than a few times and I never felt like they lost all their grip.

Wonder what Nashbar says about 'em...

inlaid grip surfacing, akin to rough grit sandpaper
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Old 05-17-18, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets
Wonder what Nashbar says about 'em...
Akin to....is not the same as "IS"

But I only own them and ride them every day. What do I know?

You've never touched them but you're the expert.
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