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Hydraulic rim brakes - why?

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Hydraulic rim brakes - why?

Old 05-17-18, 07:33 AM
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Hydraulic rim brakes - why?

It seems that these days they are used mainly on trekking bikes, but I still don't quite get what are their advantages when compared to the two main types - discs and traditional, cable actuated rim brakes? I have never tried out them myself but from what I see I assume that while they most probably are stronger than cable-actuated rim brakes, they seem also to be bulkier, hence heavier and also more sophisticated - basically a hydro disc brake with all the flaws of a rim brake. About the only advantage of hydro rim brakes over disc brakes I can think of is that they don't exert asymmetric force on the axle and fork, and thus don't require them being reinforced extra.
I reckon hydro rim brakes showed up before the advent of disc brakes on bicycles, but what's the point of them today? They also are rather expensive, on par with hydro disc brakes.
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Old 05-17-18, 08:04 AM
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They're more powerful and have better modulation than cable rim brakes. Lever pull is smooth like hydraulic discs. I had a set of Magura HS22's in the 90's and they were outstanding. They would probably be more popular if discs didn't take over the scene.
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Old 05-17-18, 08:41 AM
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I guess if you loved your frame (but the frame couldn't take discs) and you have smaller hands (such as my spouse) or wimpier forearms (such as me), you might like 1-2 finger braking from the hoods.
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Old 05-17-18, 08:45 AM
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... and have no cable/housing drag.. have a bike with HS33 brakes I've been riding for 10 years.
closed hydraulic system does not need any additional bleeding after installation.

they Just are not polished and pretty....


Cost, being higher is largely due to being made in Germany ..
cable brakes come in huge numbers from Asian companies supplying mostly OEM Asian bike companies.
And the overwhelming volume of bikes shipped to the US, Canada,
are sourced from Pacific rim companies ..

Not Europe..




..

Last edited by fietsbob; 05-18-18 at 09:38 AM.
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Old 05-17-18, 09:05 AM
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Help yourselves.
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Old 05-17-18, 10:08 AM
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their narrow tire brake MAGURA [47 reach +/- 6mm]






...

Last edited by fietsbob; 05-22-18 at 08:49 AM.
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Old 05-17-18, 11:46 AM
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Because they have the disadvantages of both types?
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Old 05-17-18, 12:33 PM
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Hydraulic rim brakes - why?

Easy, because they are possible and require new technology and all new parts to manufacture and sell. In other words, money to be made.

I am sure they can have more power, better modulation and provide a boost for small hands. As a larger handed fellow (but not especially strong), I will never need them. There are many good cable operated calipers out there. IN the 1950s. several calipers were developed that have passed the test of time. Mafacs, both their centerpulls and cantilevers. A number of veryh good sidepulls came along in the '70s. Dual pivots in the '90s with so much power I "de-tune" them using V-brake levers (which my big hands love).

My bikes have (caliper/lever) Mafac front, Weinmann rear/Tetro road levers on two bikes, Shimano canti/V-brake lever (those old Shimano cantis are an almost exact copy of the Mafac in geometry), sidepull/Tektro road levers and dual-pivot/V-brake levers on two bikes. All have great braking. (The sidepull/Tektros a little too much for the fix gear they are on.)

Now, when it comes to my bikes, small hands need not apply. I love and can reach easily really big levers.

Ben
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Old 05-17-18, 01:21 PM
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They were popular for trials bikes.
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Old 05-17-18, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob
their narrow tire brake MAGURA

Now if that was in a polished silver finish with a delta shaped cover I'd very happily buy it.
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Old 05-18-18, 04:27 AM
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do the rider can squeeze the rim into a more narrow profile using the hyd. brute clamping force.
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Old 05-18-18, 04:52 AM
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I must have just hit old fart status. I never realized rum brakes were so difficult to squeeze adequately and modulate.
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Old 05-18-18, 04:53 AM
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Originally Posted by FlMTNdude
I must have just hit old fart status. I never realized rum brakes were so difficult to squeeze adequately and modulate.
I just went through all the replies and nobody said that.
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Old 05-18-18, 05:26 AM
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There's always going to be a market for luxury bike (and car and motorcycle and etc) parts. I'm sort of happy that hydro rim brakes exist. I'd try a set if I had a newish rim brake bike. I like that they are out there.
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Old 05-18-18, 05:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Lazyass
I just went through all the replies and nobody said that.
That should have said rim not rum.
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Old 05-18-18, 07:25 AM
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i am really old because i am still totally impressed with dual pivot rim brakes.
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Old 05-18-18, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict
After all these years, I still cannot get used to the looks of disc brakes. Sure they go well with rugged MTBs. But on sleek road bikes, a small caliper over the rim looks so so much better.
Funny...I think they look right at home on 80mm carbon rim NACA airfoil-profile-tube bikes. Moreso than on box section MTB rims or round tube-frames.
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Old 05-18-18, 08:48 AM
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Have had many a mixte, in the shop U bend in the rear housing filled with water , repeatedly ,
and cable rusted into not moving at all..
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Old 05-18-18, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by FlMTNdude

That should have said rim not rum.
Damn, I was lookin' forward to gettin' some of them rum brakes.
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Old 05-18-18, 09:42 AM
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I don't have a clue about the bicycle market in Latvia..

OP is probably just looking online and found this Hamster Wheel of opinions..


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Old 05-18-18, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob
I don't have a clue about the bicycle market in Latvia..

OP is probably just looking online and found this Hamster Wheel of opinions..


Is that Hamster Wheel equipped with hydraulic rim brakes?
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Old 05-18-18, 10:28 AM
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As of yet, I have not had the opportunity to use disc brakes on a bike. But I have a question that maybe someone here can answer. I've seen bikes of all styles (road, MTB, cyclo, gravel, commuter) that have a combo rim and disc braking set-up. Specifically...they'll have a disc on the front (cable or hydro), and a traditional cable/rim brake on the rear. It seems to me that if you're going to have a combo that having the disc on the rear would make more sense. My thought is that having a disc brake would enable the rider to lock-up the wheel...but I can't think of a stopping condition in which I'd want to lock up my front wheel. If it's skidding, I've lost all control. I think I'd rather have the disc on the rear. In a combo situation like this...why have the disc on the front?


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Old 05-18-18, 10:58 AM
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I was put on the ground by my hypersensitive front disc brake.. never an issue with the HS 33.
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Old 05-18-18, 11:37 AM
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Originally Posted by _ForceD_
It seems to me that if you're going to have a combo that having the disc on the rear would make more sense. My thought is that having a disc brake would enable the rider to lock-up the wheel...but I can't think of a stopping condition in which I'd want to lock up my front wheel. If it's skidding, I've lost all control. I think I'd rather have the disc on the rear. In a combo situation like this...why have the disc on the front?
In a hard stop most of your braking comes from the front brake (in a real panic stop the rear wheel is almost completely unweighted and hardly contributes any braking force). Even a mediocre rim brake should be able to lock up the rear wheel, so no greater force is needed there and precise modulation is less critical. Having the stronger force and more precise modulation on the front wheel allows you to brake at the optimum point, i.e. just before the front tire starts to skid or the rear wheel starts to come off the ground.
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Old 05-18-18, 12:33 PM
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I had seen other uses of Hydraulic rim brakes ..

One on a bike in the Hostel Bike shed, seen when touring Europe , was a cantilever brake.

lever master and hose connected to a fork crown mounted slave piston
that pushed the cable connecting the mechanical brakes, up in the center,

making the brake pads apply pressure against the rim..
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