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Slime Sealant for tires?

Old 05-18-18, 08:56 AM
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Slime Sealant for tires?

Has anyone used this for repairing a flat mid rails to trails.. does it work well.. i think i read you can also inject it before an incident and it should auto seal..

I'm just wondering if this is fools gold or if it really works, or is too messy to deal with in the end (when changing tubes eventually)?

I do carry spare tubes and usually canisters of air, along with a slow pump (manual) but was just wondering if this offers adequate protection or a quick fix in the event everything else fails

Thanks in advance
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Old 05-18-18, 09:34 AM
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Consider Flat Attack for tubes instead. Put in tubes before you get the flat. Not messy... it's contained in the tube.
Flat Attack works. I don't know about Slime.
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Old 05-18-18, 09:39 AM
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You would have to have tubes with a removable valve core to inject the sealant, unless there's some new thing I'm not aware of. When I'm on my bike with tubular tires I carry a little 2oz bottle of Stan's sealant in my jersey pocket.
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Old 05-18-18, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Lazyass
You would have to have tubes with a removable valve core to inject the sealant, unless there's some new thing I'm not aware of. When I'm on my bike with tubular tires I carry a little 2oz bottle of Stan's sealant in my jersey pocket.
Shows how far behind I am in tube knowledge, thanks for pointing that out. All my tubes are standard ones, along with the spares i have.. doesnt stans also need this removable valve core as well.. is a presta core the same thing as well? I guess i'd need to change out all my tubes just to be able to use one of these sealants.. or maybe carry the new type of tube so when it does go flat I'll have them in for next time.

I'm not seeing a ton of 26" removable core tubes with decent ratings on amazon unless i'm searching for the wrong terminology.
edit: i do see Zol Mountain Bike Bicycle Inner Tube 26" x1.95/2.125 PRESTA Valve 48mm for $13.95 for two (with 4 bikes i guess i'd grab 4 of these if swapping beforehand, otherwise maybe carry one dual pack for the next flat)
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Old 05-18-18, 10:04 AM
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All schreader valves have removable cores, you just need the little tool to get them out.
I used a Slime tube once. They are heavy, and they tend to clog the valve so when you notice you need to put more air in, the valve is clogged and you have to take it apart, blowing slime out, and then clean it out, then put air in. IMHO it's not worth the effort to use a slime filled tube.
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Old 05-18-18, 11:25 AM
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I'm trying to envision a scenario where carrying a spare tube/air/pump becomes a "fail".
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Old 05-18-18, 11:34 AM
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20+ years ago a friend of mine injected sealant with a needle , then patched the puncture from the needle
and restitched the tire, to ride (low cost) sew-ups on his commute to work .. Mechanic at a GM dealership.
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Old 05-18-18, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by leob1
All schreader valves have removable cores, you just need the little tool to get them out.
I used a Slime tube once. They are heavy, and they tend to clog the valve so when you notice you need to put more air in, the valve is clogged and you have to take it apart, blowing slime out, and then clean it out, then put air in. IMHO it's not worth the effort to use a slime filled tube.
So if i really wanted to carry some type of sealant with me, all i need is the tool to take the inner part of the valve and then inject ? (flat attack or stans i guess) Am i understanding this correct.. and yeah ill still carry a spare tube and some air.. i have an older bike without a quick release front wheel at least, i guess the odds are low out of 4 bikes i run into that, but i also have a wrench, it was also a nightmare to change its rear tube once, mid trail
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Old 05-18-18, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by markm75
So if i really wanted to carry some type of sealant with me, all i need is the tool to take the inner part of the valve and then inject ? (flat attack or stans i guess) Am i understanding this correct..
Yes. Some brands of sealant actually comes with a valve core removal tool, Stan's doesn't but it's inexpensive. If you carry a chain tool, or a spoke wrench, it actually can unscrew the core, it's the perfect size. My Crank Bros multi tool has the chain tool.



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Old 05-18-18, 12:49 PM
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Here's the tool you need to remove the valve core--and you'll always know where to find it.

https://www.amazon.com/valve-stem-ca...core%20remover
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Old 05-18-18, 01:39 PM
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1, Buy a good set of flat resistant tires.

2. Learn to change a tube.

3. Bring a tube or two on your rides along with the good pump.

4. Save your money on the slime. IMHO way more trouble than it is worth.
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Old 05-18-18, 01:57 PM
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Why would you want to carry Slime with you on the bike? If I were going to use sealant, I'd put it in before I go anywhere. That's what that Slime was designed for, putting in tires to seal up any potential punctures, not for fixing a puncture after it happens. Put it in the tire, start riding so it coats the outer side of the tube well, and hope it seals up any punctures you get.

Only bike I'd put it in is my beater/gravel bike which has 26x2 tires with Schrader valve tubes. I can't remember if I've put any into the tires on that bike or not, but someone has said that in cases of flat tires that weren't sealed by the slime, it keeps patches from sticking when you go to patch them. Plus it can be a mess.
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Old 05-18-18, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by WNCGoater
I'm trying to envision a scenario where carrying a spare tube/air/pump becomes a "fail".
Spare tube wasn't cared for and is dry rotted

Spare tube was punctured

Pump handle breaks when used

Pump inner air seal fails

Those are just off the top of my head.

I still don't like slime sealants I don't use them. I'm just pointing out that well laid plans in biking typically all hinge on multiple parts working. If your pump fails, all the spare tubes in the world do you no good. If your spare tube has a hole, no about of pumping is going to help. etc etc

My backup for such events is a good pair of shoes so I can comfortably walk home.
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Old 05-18-18, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Skipjacks
Spare tube wasn't cared for and is dry rotted

Spare tube was punctured

Pump handle breaks when used

Pump inner air seal fails

Those are just off the top of my head.

I still don't like slime sealants I don't use them. I'm just pointing out that well laid plans in biking typically all hinge on multiple parts working. If your pump fails, all the spare tubes in the world do you no good. If your spare tube has a hole, no about of pumping is going to help. etc etc

My backup for such events is a good pair of shoes so I can comfortably walk home.
Sounds like the problem is poor maintenance on your part. Slime isn't the answer there and only the start of your problems.
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Old 05-18-18, 03:34 PM
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The slime yellow label is for use after a flat. I don't know if it comes in a small enough bottle to take on a ride. I would use something like Stan's instead for emergency repair.
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Old 05-19-18, 05:37 AM
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just go tubeless!
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Old 05-19-18, 05:43 AM
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It works. I've used Slime for tubes in my hybrids to prevent or slow down leaks until I get home. If I do get a puncture all I need to do is reinflate the tire -- the extra pressure helps seal the puncture against the inside of the tire so the Slime forms a little snot plug. Slime doesn't seem to hold as well with underinflated tires.

In February I even used it on my road bike's front tire tube for a few weeks. I was installing some really tight fitting Continental Ultra Sport 2 tires and didn't have a bead jack at the time. I nicked the front tube with a plastic tire lever. I was too aggravated to redo the tire so I just filled the tube with Slime. Spun the wheel several times to distribute the Slime and it sealed the puncture. Held for about a month before the snot-like plug of Slime blew out. At that point I swapped in a new tube and had a tire bead jack to do the job properly.

It is messy though. I had to stash the Slimed tube with the puncture in a ziplock baggie I had in my seat bag. Otherwise it would have made a huge mess. It's still in my parts bin waiting to be cleaned up and patched.
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Old 05-19-18, 06:06 AM
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Slime works, but needs to be installed before you get a puncture. The extra weight is compensated by not needing to carry a spare tube. I use it in all my tubes. For presta tubes just buy the pre slimed ones, they have the removable core. I usually buy the one quart car sized bottle, it's great in wheelbarrows, lawnmower wheels and the like.
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Old 05-19-18, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Lazyass
Yes. Some brands of sealant actually comes with a valve core removal tool, Stan's doesn't but it's inexpensive. If you carry a chain tool, or a spoke wrench, it actually can unscrew the core, it's the perfect size. My Crank Bros multi tool has the chain tool.



This never occurred to me. Thanks
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Old 05-19-18, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by superpletch
just go tubeless!
Tubeless...or, more specifically, the sealant in tubeless tires...is just Slime that puts on airs.

Originally Posted by markm75
Has anyone used this for repairing a flat mid rails to trails.. does it work well.. i think i read you can also inject it before an incident and it should auto seal..

I'm just wondering if this is fools gold or if it really works, or is too messy to deal with in the end (when changing tubes eventually)?

I do carry spare tubes and usually canisters of air, along with a slow pump (manual) but was just wondering if this offers adequate protection or a quick fix in the event everything else fails

Thanks in advance
Does it work? Yes. Can it be a pain to deal with? Yes. Do most co-op volunteers hate the stuff? Yes because we've been Slimed at some point in our volunteer activities.

There are some things to be aware of when using Slime.
  • You have to put it in the tire before you start riding...just like sealant in tubeless.
  • It can leak out and make a mess in the tire as you've pointed out but that is usually because you are using it wrong.
  • Someone at my co-op pointed out that you should pull out whatever is causing the puncture as soon as possible. If, for example, the puncture is a thorn, the thorn will flex and move each time it hit the contact patch. This opens up the puncture and allows air and Slime to leak out. Pulling out the thorn will seal the hole better.
  • It can clog the valve. Keep the valve at the top of the tire when you stop or store the bike to keep the valve clear.
  • It makes the wheels heavier...just like sealant in tubeless.
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