Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Metric Century used to be called 62 miles

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Metric Century used to be called 62 miles

Old 06-07-18, 02:07 PM
  #76  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,528
Liked 1,402 Times in 738 Posts
Perhaps the question should be expressed this way: In counties where the metric system is used, are 100km rides called metric centuries or just centuries? Do they use the optional nomenclature of "62 miles" as well? In countries that use the English measuring system why call a 62 mile ride a metric century? Why not just call it what it is, 62 miles? Seems to me that calling a 62 mile ride a "metric century" is trying to make it something it is not. It is not a "century ride", which is 100 miles, however it must make a lot of people feel good about themselves because they did some kind of century ride, although they did not do a century ride.
TiHabanero is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 02:10 PM
  #77  
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 22,655

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Liked 2,585 Times in 1,586 Posts
Originally Posted by TiHabanero
Perhaps the question should be expressed this way: In counties where the metric system is used, are 100km rides called metric centuries or just centuries? Do they use the optional nomenclature of "62 miles" as well? In countries that use the English measuring system why call a 62 mile ride a metric century? Why not just call it what it is, 62 miles? Seems to me that calling a 62 mile ride a "metric century" is trying to make it something it is not. It is not a "century ride", which is 100 miles, however it must make a lot of people feel good about themselves because they did some kind of century ride, although they did not do a century ride.
Piggybacking on my earlier question, what would be the point of a 62-mile ride if not in reference to 100 km? Wouldn't you just ride 60 or 70 miles and call it a day? I've never ever heard of someone setting out to ride 62 miles, in those words.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 02:11 PM
  #78  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Boston
Posts: 2,201

Bikes: 2017 Raleigh RX 1.0, 2018 Specialized Allez

Liked 634 Times in 338 Posts
Well, I'm doing a granfondo in Europe and they have a mediofondo of 97km and the granfondo is 174km, I think that's the nomenclature they use and that century term may be more of an American doing.
hubcyclist is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 03:42 PM
  #79  
Senior Member
 
UniChris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 1,909

Bikes: 36" Unicycle, winter knock-around hybrid bike

Liked 393 Times in 282 Posts
I'm getting increasingly tempted to cancel this weekend's ride as I just can't shake the nagging fear that the wheel diameter I enter into the computer might be off by a few millimeters, or that I might go over a bump and have the battery jiggle enough to reset it again.

I mean, what if I sweat it out all day and come back with no idea what I actually accomplished????

(In all seriousness, in thinking about exploring on a network of paths with some repeated sections, it is more of a thought than a typical point A to B and back to A ride)
UniChris is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 04:16 PM
  #80  
Senior Member
 
winston63's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 707

Bikes: Specialized Diverge E5 Comp, Specialized AWOL Comp, Scott Solace 10

Liked 27 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by TiHabanero
Perhaps the question should be expressed this way: In counties where the metric system is used, are 100km rides called metric centuries or just centuries? Do they use the optional nomenclature of "62 miles" as well? In countries that use the English measuring system why call a 62 mile ride a metric century? Why not just call it what it is, 62 miles? Seems to me that calling a 62 mile ride a "metric century" is trying to make it something it is not. It is not a "century ride", which is 100 miles, however it must make a lot of people feel good about themselves because they did some kind of century ride, although they did not do a century ride.
Around these parts I've regularly seen 100 km ride called a Century. 100 miles is called an Imperial Century. I've participated in organized rides of both lengths and that's been the terminology I've observed.

I don't particularly care what someone calls it, just be clear about what distance you are talking about!
winston63 is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 04:50 PM
  #81  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,528
Liked 1,402 Times in 738 Posts
Winston63, you just sparked the answer. I see now it is a "name" for a certain distance. Easier to say and somehow easier to understand than 62 miles. I get it. Problem solved.
TiHabanero is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 05:03 PM
  #82  
Senior Member
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 3,478

Bikes: A few...

Liked 372 Times in 258 Posts
Originally Posted by Happy Feet
I was in elementary school when Canada switched and learned both as a result. Over the years I've adopted metric for everything except temperature; my brain simply thinks in F (even though I know the basics in C).
Today I was describing the weather as being about 65 degrees to a 95 year old lady I was walking and she couldn't relate - She only thinks in Celsius! I couldn't convert for her. There was something very odd about that encounter.
Geeze, I remember when Canada used Imperial gallons, as opposed to US gallons. Then they went and converted to the Metric system...
Cougrrcj is offline  
Old 06-07-18, 08:29 PM
  #83  
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit/AA
Posts: 8,206

Bikes: 2016 Novara Mazama

Liked 81 Times in 51 Posts
Originally Posted by TiHabanero
Why not just call it what it is, 62 miles? Seems to me that calling a 62 mile ride a "metric century" is trying to make it something it is not. It is not a "century ride", which is 100 miles, however it must make a lot of people feel good about themselves because they did some kind of century ride, although they did not do a century ride.
Why not just call a "century" 100 miles? It isn't some sort of logical accomplishment, it is just a nice round number in the Imperial system.
jefnvk is offline  
Old 06-17-18, 01:14 PM
  #84  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Westchester County, NY
Posts: 311

Bikes: Trek 3500, Jamis Renegade Escapade

Liked 51 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by jefnvk
I presume you grew up with C?
Yes indeed! ;-)

Originally Posted by jefnvk
50F, it is more or less halfway between the general average extremes of temperature
Hmm, this is an interesting thought, I've never considered it from this point of view (as if this temperature system is really designed around 0 - 100 scale). I guess for me negative - cold, positive - warm makes more sense. May be this is just a software developer speaking in me... Zero as a center just somehow feels logical. Zero also happens to be more or less halfway between the general average extremes of temperature. Did I mention that I grew up in Russia? Casual temperature range is about -25 to +25.

Originally Posted by jefnvk
Why is a system based off the freezing and boiling point of water any more or less practical
Or, it definitely is! Pretty much all living beings on this planet, including ourselves, are made out of water for the most part, so these two particular temperatures have everyday practical implications in all areas of life. E.g. refrigerator in the kitchen that will have (usually) two sections: freezer (below 0) and just cold. There is a bid difference between just cold water and piece of ice.

Originally Posted by jefnvk
I agree makes more sense engineering
Celsius scale is actually for casual use, not for engineering or science, it is not a SI unit - it'll be Kelvin (which is compatible with Celsius in size but highly impractical in "normal" life due to its scale).

Originally Posted by prathmann
I think this is true for many people and is due to the 32F offset between the two temperature scales. I.e. it's not just a ratio but also a fixed offset. For most things we don't need the exact conversion so remembering that a meter is just a bit longer than a yard, that a mile is a little more than 1.5 km, or that a liter is barely more than a quart is sufficient to let us feel comfortable with both sets of units. But with temperatures you need to apply the 9/5 ratio but then also factor in the 32 degree offset to convert C to F and that makes it much less intuitive. My mother had the same comment in the opposite direction having grown up with the metric units before moving to the US. She felt that she always had to convert temperatures to degrees C before they made sense to her.
Exactly the same experience. No problem with other measures but temperature in F always feels as a riddle.

BTW, in metric countries measurement systems are also composed of the mix the of scientific SI units and customary metric units outside of it. Like Celsius, for example. At least conversion from C to K is straightforward (and no one uses K temperatures in real life). There are much worse cases, the most obvious one will be speed measurement. Everyone measures vehicle speed in km/h. This is what you see on your speedometer. Yet wind speed in weather forecasts (at least in Russia) is always listed in m/s. I can't relate m/s to km/h, I know how fast is 60 km/h, how fast is 60 m/s I have no slightest idea (except that it'll be exceptionally strong wind, probably a hurricane or so). Also, someone mentioned pressure units... This is another oddity - in Russia weather forecasts use mmHg as a pressure unit. If I select metric temperature scale then the majority of weather software will show me pressure in mBar - which tells me absolutely nothing. Old habits die hard!
Oso Polar is offline  
Old 06-17-18, 03:55 PM
  #85  
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 293
Liked 47 Times in 22 Posts
Metric Century

i just call that a “ride”.
Cyclcist11023131 is offline  
Old 06-17-18, 06:01 PM
  #86  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 147
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by Rider_1
Metric makes WAY more sense. The important extremes, freezing and boiling, are 0 and 100. How does 32 and 212 make sense. Metric is just so much neater and rational.
Scientifically, Celsius obviously makes more sense, as does Kelvin (which is just Celsius with the goalposts shifted by 273). For people to describe temperature commonly found in nature, Fahrenheit does make more sense. 0F to 100F is a more or less even range of habitable temperatures. It is also more 80% more granular without having to resort to decimals.
jfoobar is offline  
Old 06-17-18, 06:02 PM
  #87  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 147
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by Nermal
There are two kinds of nations in the world. Those that use metric and those that put a man on the moon.
Do let us know when either Liberia or Myanmar puts a man on the moon.
jfoobar is offline  
Old 06-17-18, 07:16 PM
  #88  
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit/AA
Posts: 8,206

Bikes: 2016 Novara Mazama

Liked 81 Times in 51 Posts
Originally Posted by Rider_1
Metric makes WAY more sense. The important extremes, freezing and boiling, are 0 and 100. How does 32 and 212 make sense. Metric is just so much neater and rational.
By that logic, it makes even more sense to make 0 absolute zero. Are you a fan of the Kelvin scale, or would calling out room temps as 296K not be acceptable to you
jefnvk is offline  
Old 06-18-18, 07:56 AM
  #89  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 15,648

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Liked 5,131 Times in 3,531 Posts
If metric makes so much sense, why was it one of the last measurement systems developed?
Iride01 is offline  
Old 06-18-18, 08:44 AM
  #90  
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,126
Liked 1,316 Times in 708 Posts
Why quantum when we already had newton
Why gasoline when we already had steam
Why cell phones when we already had letters...
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 06-18-18, 08:58 AM
  #91  
FLIR Kitten to 0.05C
 
Marcus_Ti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Posts: 5,331

Bikes: Roadie: Seven Axiom Race Ti w/Chorus 11s. CX/Adventure: Carver Gravel Grinder w/ Di2

Liked 407 Times in 255 Posts
Originally Posted by jfoobar
Scientifically, Celsius obviously makes more sense, as does Kelvin (which is just Celsius with the goalposts shifted by 273). For people to describe temperature commonly found in nature, Fahrenheit does make more sense. 0F to 100F is a more or less even range of habitable temperatures. It is also more 80% more granular without having to resort to decimals.
People who care about decimal accuracy are probably already using metric. For anyone out in the wilderness (urban, suburban, or rural) the difference between 23C and 24C isn't a whole lot. It is "everyday" good enough.
Marcus_Ti is offline  
Old 06-18-18, 10:54 PM
  #92  
Senior Member
 
bogydave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: ALASKA , SoCal
Posts: 914

Bikes: /Skye/ Torker mt, Sirrus flat bar

Liked 24 Times in 10 Posts
Made us USA folks be able to say
“Rode a Century today” & feel we accomplished something special.
“Did a Metric century today” sounds cool ...compared to “rode 62 miles today”

But we still know it as a 62 mile ride.
Which in its own right, is something special



bogydave is offline  
Old 06-18-18, 11:45 PM
  #93  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,795
Liked 144 Times in 107 Posts
Originally Posted by Oso Polar


Or, it definitely is! Pretty much all living beings on this planet, including ourselves, are made out of water for the most part, so these two particular temperatures have everyday practical implications in all areas of life. E.g. refrigerator in the kitchen that will have (usually) two sections: freezer (below 0) and just cold. There is a bid difference between just cold water and piece of ice.
No, no, no!. You need to keep your freezer at 0 degF, about -18C. Your refrigerator section should be just above 32F (a little above 0 C -- maybe about 4 deg C, just to keep things dense) Also, there is no temperature difference between cold water at 0C and a block of ice at 0C.

Originally Posted by Oso Polar
BTW, in metric countries measurement systems are also composed of the mix the of scientific SI units and customary metric units outside of it.
I'm not understanding this. If metric countries don't use metric units but use a combinatiion of metric units and customary units, what's the point? If you use the non-metric speed km/h instead of the proper SI metric unit m/s, what's the difference if you use mph instead?

My point is, you're only a virgin once.
desconhecido is offline  
Old 06-19-18, 01:46 AM
  #94  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Oahu, HI
Posts: 1,409

Bikes: 89 Paramount OS 84 Fuji Touring Series III New! 2013 Focus Izalco Ergoride

Likes: 0
Liked 75 Times in 55 Posts
So, what's a 100 nautical mile ride called?

scott s.
.
scott967 is offline  
Old 06-19-18, 12:06 PM
  #95  
Passista
 
Reynolds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 7,682

Bikes: 1998 Pinarello Asolo, 1992 KHS Montaña pro, 1980 Raleigh DL-1, IGH Hybrid, IGH Utility

Liked 769 Times in 422 Posts
Originally Posted by desconhecido


I'm not understanding this. If metric countries don't use metric units but use a combinatiion of metric units and customary units, what's the point? If you use the non-metric speed km/h instead of the proper SI metric unit m/s, what's the difference if you use mph instead?
Some countries use metric for 95% of measurements, but still keep old units for a few ones, like psi or lbs in certain uses (not all) - or sell some items in 454 grams containers.
Reynolds is offline  
Old 06-19-18, 02:00 PM
  #96  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,803
Liked 330 Times in 208 Posts
Originally Posted by desconhecido



I'm not understanding this. If metric countries don't use metric units but use a combinatiion of metric units and customary units, what's the point? If you use the non-metric speed km/h instead of the proper SI metric unit m/s, what's the difference if you use mph instead?
How is km/h not metric?
OBoile is offline  
Old 06-20-18, 09:36 AM
  #97  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Houston
Posts: 540

Bikes: Novarra Randonee 2016, Trek Verve 2 2015

Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by OBoile
How is km/h not metric?
h (hour) is not a decimal multiple of the time unit s (second). m/s or cm/s or mm/s are correct metric units for velocity in various metric systems.
GerryinHouston is offline  
Old 06-20-18, 12:12 PM
  #98  
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Left Coast, Canada
Posts: 5,126
Liked 1,316 Times in 708 Posts
Originally Posted by GerryinHouston
h (hour) is not a decimal multiple of the time unit s (second). m/s or cm/s or mm/s are correct metric units for velocity in various metric systems.
Yes and no.

In Imperial you could also use feet per second (fps) as in ballistics which would equate to meters per second. But for car or bicycle speeds those numbers would be too large and complicated so they use MPH or KPH which, in context, is correct.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 06-20-18, 01:41 PM
  #99  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Houston
Posts: 540

Bikes: Novarra Randonee 2016, Trek Verve 2 2015

Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
You asked whether km/h is metric. It is not!

Any customary use or contextual argument dos not make it metric. Metric units are the basic units (m/s in this case) or decimal multiples (km/s, mm/s etc).
GerryinHouston is offline  
Old 06-20-18, 02:56 PM
  #100  
Senior Member
 
Troul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Mich
Posts: 7,788

Bikes: RSO E-tire dropper fixie brifter

Liked 3,252 Times in 2,065 Posts
a century translates to me as a ventury.

Venting along the way for a rather longer then usual distance.
__________________
-YMMV
Troul is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.