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Old 07-09-18, 12:49 AM
  #26  
KraneXL
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
More about myself than the bike, but I have fewer hand problems if I don't wear gloves. For some reason, I seem to hold the handlebar tighter with gloves on, and have learned that white-knuckling is a real thing. I forgot to put the gloves on one day and discovered I didn't grip so hard when I could feel the contact. Also, I detect numbness creeping in much faster, and can make position adjustment before it gets serious. I think it's just harder to notice numbness when your hand is padded.
Enhanced sensory perception. That may be true in the short run. Not so likely in the long run. On the other hand, you could just be using the wrong gloves? Like pillows that are too hard, or too soft.
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Old 07-09-18, 04:34 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
Enhanced sensory perception. That may be true in the short run. Not so likely in the long run. On the other hand, you could just be using the wrong gloves? Like pillows that are too hard, or too soft.
Don't know how you define the long run, but I rode 200miles this weekend and 110 miles on July 4 without gloves, and my hands are fine. I won't be glove shopping.
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Old 07-09-18, 06:55 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Jofu View Post
You just need to pull back the rubber portion from the hood, and for Shimano shifters you'll see a 2mm allen screw at the top which you can "screw in" and in the process will push the brake levers in. For SRAM (at least for RED eTap), the 2.5mm allen screw is on the out side, and it can be turned in 3 different positions which adjust the brake lever in 3 different positions in succession. Once done, you will likely need to adjust your brakes.

Ok it's probably just easier to watch the GCN Youtube video for it

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GESGpwNLuTQ

Geoff
Well, that was a very useful bit of advice. I'm going to check that out - speaking as someone with small hands! Thanks for the tip!
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Old 07-09-18, 09:21 AM
  #29  
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Things I've learned after 1 year and 3,250+ miles of cycling...

1) Don't let your front wheel overlap the back wheel of the rider in front of you. Ask me how I learned this - ha!
2) The 3 'touch-points' of the bike are vital as far as comfort goes. Don't skimp on shoes, gloves or shorts!
3) Riding with a group will help you ride more miles and push yourself more than you will when riding alone.
4) Explore! Look around! Have FUN!! :-)

Gary
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Old 07-09-18, 10:47 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
More about myself than the bike, but I have fewer hand problems if I don't wear gloves. For some reason, I seem to hold the handlebar tighter with gloves on, and have learned that white-knuckling is a real thing. I forgot to put the gloves on one day and discovered I didn't grip so hard when I could feel the contact. Also, I detect numbness creeping in much faster, and can make position adjustment before it gets serious. I think it's just harder to notice numbness when your hand is padded.
You also avoid the obnoxious glove tan lines.
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Old 07-09-18, 11:13 AM
  #31  
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I've learned that zig-zagging up very steep hills does ease the pain a bit!
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Old 07-09-18, 11:39 AM
  #32  
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I started racing in 1987 and I just realized that drinking Gatorade really helps on long, hot rides. I was one of those "pah! energy drinks are a ripoff!" guys previously.
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Old 07-09-18, 01:03 PM
  #33  
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Thanks to some very friendly drivers peppering me with advice while driving, I have learned a number of surprising rules in the last month:

1) If I am to the left of a right turn lane, I am required to signal that I am going straight.

2) If the shoulder of a road is marked off with a white line, the shoulder automatically becomes a bike path, and I am required to confine myself to the right of that line regardless of the condition of the shoulder.

3) I should ride on the sidewalk.

4) If I am the first vehicle to a red light at a busy intersection, I must move to the right to facilitate a right turn on red by the car behind me even though that will put me in the blind spot of cars turning right after the light turns green.

5) I should watch where I'm going but it's ok to completely obstruct the rear window of a car with stuffed animals (still don't know what that guy was babbling about, but apparently he was my "bro").

6) I should get off of the road.

7) If I'm in a nearly empty convenience store/gas station parking lot, I am required to follow the arrows as if I was going through the donut drive thru or the gas pumps, even though that's actually about 1/4 mile around the lot, and I can see everybody entering and leaving the parking lot and the blacktop is incredibly hot. Otherwise, I am asking to be killed. (A pedestrian taking the exact same route out of the parking lot would have been perfectly safe and not challenged).

8) If I am on a state road, and I roll through an intersection while the truck on the side street waits at the stop sign, I should express my gratitude to him for not rolling the stop sign and killing me.

Last edited by livedarklions; 07-09-18 at 01:05 PM. Reason: typo
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Old 07-09-18, 01:51 PM
  #34  
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Old 07-09-18, 07:40 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
Don't know how you define the long run, but I rode 200miles this weekend and 110 miles on July 4 without gloves, and my hands are fine. I won't be glove shopping.
Similar with your definition of "fine". Gloves can have many purposes: Sometimes they serve as a barrier to protect from pathogens or caustic chemicals. Other times they serve as a cushion.

Sure you can have a better feel sensation without gloves, but that's not always a good thing. Just try boxing or using high voltage without gloves and see how long you last. I'm met many people (particularly men) who brag about and feel its "fine" to have rough, dried, cracked and calloused hands from farm work or other similar "dirty jobs."


Anyway, it all depends on what you need the gloves for. I use mine for cushioning. Particularly the meaty part of the palm. Believe me once you've fallen off your bike onto that part of your hand, you won't ride again without them.
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Old 07-09-18, 08:23 PM
  #36  
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I find it more comfortable to wear gloves, but I also wear gloves for hand protection. I've only gone down once that my hands hit the pavement, but my half-finger gloves saved me big time - and I wasn't going fast.

Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
More about myself than the bike, but I have fewer hand problems if I don't wear gloves.
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Old 07-09-18, 08:35 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
Similar with your definition of "fine". Gloves can have many purposes: Sometimes they serve as a barrier to protect from pathogens or caustic chemicals. Other times they serve as a cushion.

Sure you can have a better feel sensation without gloves, but that's not always a good thing. Just try boxing or using high voltage without gloves and see how long you last. I'm met many people (particularly men) who brag about and feel its "fine" to have rough, dried, cracked and calloused hands from farm work or other similar "dirty jobs."


Anyway, it all depends on what you need the gloves for. I use mine for cushioning. Particularly the meaty part of the palm. Believe me once you've fallen off your bike onto that part of your hand, you won't ride again without them.
I have callouses from weight lifting and the elliptical machine, so that ship sailed years ago ( gym gloves actually made that worse as a lot of people discover). I also have never considered callouses as any kind of big deal as I have had plenty of them from musical instruments over the years. Otherwise, I'm 57 years old, the skin on my hands has never been better, and it definitely does better in the open air. No offense, but I know a lot more about what does and doesn't work for MY hands than you do. And yes, I have fallen on my hands both with and without gloves, and I don't think the marginal difference in protection is worth the trouble gloves were causing me.
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Old 07-10-18, 03:24 AM
  #38  
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The height of post should suitable with your leg length ,it will make you have a comfortable riding
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Old 07-10-18, 01:42 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
Thanks to some very friendly drivers peppering me with advice while driving, I have learned a number of surprising rules in the last month:

1) If I am to the left of a right turn lane, I am required to signal that I am going straight.

2) If the shoulder of a road is marked off with a white line, the shoulder automatically becomes a bike path, and I am required to confine myself to the right of that line regardless of the condition of the shoulder.

3) I should ride on the sidewalk.

4) If I am the first vehicle to a red light at a busy intersection, I must move to the right to facilitate a right turn on red by the car behind me even though that will put me in the blind spot of cars turning right after the light turns green.

5) I should watch where I'm going but it's ok to completely obstruct the rear window of a car with stuffed animals (still don't know what that guy was babbling about, but apparently he was my "bro").

6) I should get off of the road.

7) If I'm in a nearly empty convenience store/gas station parking lot, I am required to follow the arrows as if I was going through the donut drive thru or the gas pumps, even though that's actually about 1/4 mile around the lot, and I can see everybody entering and leaving the parking lot and the blacktop is incredibly hot. Otherwise, I am asking to be killed. (A pedestrian taking the exact same route out of the parking lot would have been perfectly safe and not challenged).

8) If I am on a state road, and I roll through an intersection while the truck on the side street waits at the stop sign, I should express my gratitude to him for not rolling the stop sign and killing me.
I like this list of Critical Knowledge All Cyclists Should Know (CKACSK).

To it, I'll add:
1. It's illegal for bikes to be on the road.
2. If you are using a crosswalk with the "Walk" sign on, you must give way to drivers turning right and you must give way drivers turning left, otherwise these innocent drivers are perfectly allowed to drill you. Because it's really hard to look in front of you while driving and missing something like a person is very easy and understandable.
3. The presence of lycra on my person is a clear indication of my sexual preference.
4. At a stop sign, cyclists should not take the lane and should stay to the right. Clearly, being "out in traffic" is crazy. Simultaneously, a cyclists who stays to the right to go straight suddenly becomes invisible and thus completely deserving of being creamed by a car turning right.
5. While approaching a stop light, a reasonable thing for drivers to do is to dangerously floor it around a cyclist and then slam on the brakes to narrowly miss the car in front of them. Because Cars Must Go In Front Of Bikes At All Times (easy to remember mnemonic: BCMGIFOBAAT).
6. The best time to pass a cyclist or group of cyclists on a road is around a blind curve with a double yellow line, preferably while flooring it. BCMGIFOBAAT.
7. Cyclists wearing brightly colored clothing and covered in bright, flashing lights in broad daylight are really, really hard to see. Almost invisible, in fact.
8. A pickup is a manly vehicle suitable for a manly man driving like a man should. A bike is... not.
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Old 07-10-18, 07:42 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by downhillmaster View Post
Just recently learned that black bicycles raise your body’s core temperature.

lol
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Old 07-10-18, 07:45 PM
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Its only illegal to do something if you get caught. This is the beauty of having 2,000 watts at your left thumb.
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Old 07-10-18, 09:58 PM
  #42  
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A few years ago I learned that even though I regularly use 6-8 gears when riding my work commute on my geared bike, riding it on a fixed gear doesn't take me any longer... I learned to stand and power up hills, and (really!) spin my way down!
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Old 07-12-18, 10:07 AM
  #43  
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My biggest surprise is cycling came in 2005. I got my first recumbent, a RANS Tailwind. My surprise was that cycling no longer has to be a pain in the neck or ass, even the first ride in the spring.
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Old 07-12-18, 10:08 AM
  #44  
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Shoot that reminds me I need to finish making my BF Bingo card
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Old 07-12-18, 10:02 PM
  #45  
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New for me to have just two chain rings. All the road bikes I've owned over the years were triples... I weigh more but have higher gears.
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Old 07-13-18, 11:40 AM
  #46  
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I learned that even minor adjustments (seat height, cleat position) can have an enormous effect on comfort and pain relief.
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Old 07-13-18, 07:03 PM
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Alloy bikes aren't cheap anymore...
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Old 07-15-18, 05:55 AM
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I've learned that a bike doesn't have to be all lathered up with XTR/XT or Dura-Ace/Ultegra, a King headset, a Thompson post, an Italian ti-railed saddle, etc.etc., in order to be a decent, solid bike that's worth owning.
(Who knew !!! )

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Old 07-15-18, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Brocephus View Post
I've learned that a bike doesn't have to be all lathered up with XTR/XT or Dura-Ace/Ultegra, a King headset, a Thompson post, an Italian ti-railed saddle, etc.etc., in order to be a decent, solid bike that's worth owning.
(Who knew !!! )
Exactly, all you need is Campy!
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Old 07-15-18, 03:20 PM
  #50  
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I'm finding out that you're never too skinny to lose weight, and that losing said weight trumps everything else in terms of increasing fitness and speed.
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