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Cycling surprises

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Old 07-07-18, 02:23 PM
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taz777
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Cycling surprises

Even after cycling for a few years, I'm still discovering things that are a surprise to me. Here's a couple for me:

1. My saddle height can be a lot higher to make things more comfortable;

2. I can shift more than one cog depending on how far I press the gear shift lever.

What have you been surprised about or discovered about cycling in general or something specific on your bike(s) that you didn't know before?
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Old 07-07-18, 04:13 PM
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I embarrassingly didnít know until a week ago that you can adjust the reach of your brakes on the shifter for Shimano and SRAM shifters.

Thatís cool, because my hands arenít very big and itís always been a bit tricky for me to grab my brakes when in the drops.

Itís much better now!

Geoff
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Old 07-07-18, 10:31 PM
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Learned to use clip-on aerobars, ride with shorter cranks, went back to using toe clips and most recently, started wearing sun sleeves.
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Old 07-08-18, 01:24 AM
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europa
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The infinite stupidity of the human animal, whether bikes are involved or not.
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Old 07-08-18, 02:19 AM
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livedarklions
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More about myself than the bike, but I have fewer hand problems if I don't wear gloves. For some reason, I seem to hold the handlebar tighter with gloves on, and have learned that white-knuckling is a real thing. I forgot to put the gloves on one day and discovered I didn't grip so hard when I could feel the contact. Also, I detect numbness creeping in much faster, and can make position adjustment before it gets serious. I think it's just harder to notice numbness when your hand is padded.
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Old 07-08-18, 02:37 AM
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
More about myself than the bike, but I have fewer hand problems if I don't wear gloves. For some reason, I seem to hold the handlebar tighter with gloves on, and have learned that white-knuckling is a real thing. I forgot to put the gloves on one day and discovered I didn't grip so hard when I could feel the contact. Also, I detect numbness creeping in much faster, and can make position adjustment before it gets serious. I think it's just harder to notice numbness when your hand is padded.
I was thinking exactly this too! I forgot my cycling mitts recently and I felt more connected to the bike. I have good grips on my bikes and found that my hands felt more comfortable during the ride.
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Old 07-08-18, 06:30 AM
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Just recently learned that black bicycles raise your bodyís core temperature.
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Old 07-08-18, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by downhillmaster View Post
Just recently learned that black bicycles raise your bodyís core temperature.
Not if you wear a summer base layer.


-Tim-
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Old 07-08-18, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by McBTC View Post
...started wearing sun sleeves.
Yes, I learned "arm warmers" can cool your arms when they're called "sun sleeves".

I also learned dressing lighter with wicking under-layers can be warmer in the winter (less sweat to freeze against your skin).

As I approach 60 I learned my days as a low cadence "masher" are over.

I learned the smug satisfaction of riding smarter takes the sting out of being passed by younger, less experienced riders. (Yeah, buddy, let's see you keep that pace when you're 56).

I learned it is not always necessary to buy and wear bike specific clothing, and that it may not be necessary at all.

I learned that while I appreciate the engineering and special ride dynamics of recumbents, recumbent trikes and small-wheel folders, there is something that "just feels right" about a diamond frame bike with conventional-sized wheels...at least for me.

I learned that the adrenaline and endorphines produced while cycling can distort one's perception of events and one's behavior.

I learned that with proper gear, I can ride in the rain and stay comfortable, relatively dry. and safe.
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Old 07-08-18, 10:33 AM
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...ride in a fasted state (for best results, break the fast with a tin of kipper snacks and wash'm down with a pint of IPA).
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Old 07-08-18, 10:43 AM
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livedarklions
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Originally Posted by downhillmaster View Post
Just recently learned that black bicycles raise your bodyís core temperature.
I learned that's only true if you swallow the bike. Passing it was not fun btw.

Last edited by livedarklions; 07-08-18 at 10:46 AM. Reason: Typo
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Old 07-08-18, 11:30 AM
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A good drink of water is
a fast acting energy boost.
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Old 07-08-18, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by BobbyG View Post
I learned it is not always necessary to buy and wear bike specific clothing, and that it may not be necessary at all.
In the current hot weather the only cycling clothing I'm wearing is padded undershorts. I feel far more comfortable in my gym top and shorts.
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Old 07-08-18, 01:20 PM
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I've learned that I'm much better at object avoidance when that object is a rattlesnake sunning itself, rather than a stick.
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Old 07-08-18, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by McBTC View Post
...ride in a fasted state (for best results, break the fast with a tin of kipper snacks and wash'm down with a pint of IPA).
Everything is better with an IPA!
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Old 07-08-18, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by taz777 View Post

1. My saddle height can be a lot higher to make things more comfortable;
I recently learnt experimenting with this that putting it up too far can cause knee pain

Just on the pins and needles in your hands as well ... I've been looking at a few bike fit videos recently and apparently too far a reach / the wrong balance on your seat can also cause it but haven't had time to experiment with but might be worth looking into.

Last edited by Witterings; 07-08-18 at 04:10 PM.
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Old 07-08-18, 04:21 PM
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Isn't IPA used to clean rotors? But seeing as that everyone is drinking it, I guess I'll give it a try.

BTW: I recently learned (the hard way) to close my water bottle spouts before inverting the bike to change a flat.
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Old 07-08-18, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Riveting View Post
BTW: I recently learned (the hard way) to close my water bottle spouts before inverting the bike to change a flat.
Sadly, that kind of knowledge is as easily forgotten as it is acquired.
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Old 07-08-18, 04:34 PM
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Old 07-08-18, 04:47 PM
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I had been riding several years before I realized that it's a lot easier to remove a rear wheel when you shift into the little cog first.
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Old 07-08-18, 06:40 PM
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After 4 decades of cycling and decades of severe back pain I self diagnosed and am fixing my back, hips and legs. Amazing new life for this sixty year old cyclist. Feeling stronger than in my racing days in the 70's.
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Old 07-08-18, 08:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Jofu View Post
I embarrassingly didnít know until a week ago that you can adjust the reach of your brakes on the shifter for Shimano and SRAM shifters.

Thatís cool, because my hands arenít very big and itís always been a bit tricky for me to grab my brakes when in the drops.

Itís much better now!

Geoff
how do you do that?
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Old 07-08-18, 09:01 PM
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I realized a couple of days ago that carbon fiber bikes really might be better, despite my nostalgia goggles. Stopped at the LBS for a Take-A-Look mirror and they persuaded me to test ride a Specialized Tarmac SL4. They even swapped my Look pedals to the Tarmac to make it easier. Rode a couple of miles on the nearby hilly neighborhood. Wow -- it felt like the bike climbed by itself. The lighter weight, stiffer bottom bracket, brifters and more ergonomically friendly hoods were a huge improvement over my 1980s road bike. But my older bike is more comfortable on bumpy roads -- more flex. Different tires on the Tarmac and lower pressure would probably make up that difference.
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Old 07-08-18, 11:39 PM
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I learned about derailleur hangers after my first crash.
I learned about front derailleur trim because without it, I could never get my 2x10 to not rub on half the gear combinations.
I learned that rolling one's hips forward on the bike meant the opposite of what I thought it meant and tried to do on purpose for months.
I learned about foam rollers and IT bands, though I'm undecided about whether this knowledge will actually help me.
I learned that no one around here knows how to ride on the hoods.
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Old 07-09-18, 12:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Imabmwnut View Post
how do you do that?
You just need to pull back the rubber portion from the hood, and for Shimano shifters you'll see a 2mm allen screw at the top which you can "screw in" and in the process will push the brake levers in. For SRAM (at least for RED eTap), the 2.5mm allen screw is on the out side, and it can be turned in 3 different positions which adjust the brake lever in 3 different positions in succession. Once done, you will likely need to adjust your brakes.

Ok it's probably just easier to watch the GCN Youtube video for it


Geoff


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