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Choosing The Correct Size Mountain/Hybrid Bike

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Choosing The Correct Size Mountain/Hybrid Bike

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Old 07-09-18, 03:51 PM
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Donagh
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Choosing The Correct Size Mountain/Hybrid Bike

Hi,


I'm a new member and I need some basic info about purchasing bikes for my wife and myself. We will be primarily using them on both paved park trails and rougher gravel, paths. Perhaps some trails with holes and roots, but not really 'mountain trails'.

I'm 5'10" and 180lbs and my wife is 5'4" 115lbs. So I guess my first question is: How do we measure for the correct size bike? Both frame size and wheel size. We were reading that 27.5" wheels are a good choice, but we really feel under-informed about basic bike knowledge. We were looking at simple entry level recreational bikes like An Ozone N27 or Ozone TZ29, or A womens Schwinn Protocol 1.0 or Schwinn High Timber I keep reading about hybrids, but they seem not quite aggressive enough for what we mighrt like to do with them them (lightly) off road. If we find we are really getting a lot of use from them, we will probably upgrade. But for now, the right size and type of bike for our needs is the information we are looking for in order to begin our search for bikes.


Thanks in advance for being patience with me and my extremely basic questions.


Donagh
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Old 07-09-18, 04:16 PM
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chicagogal
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Go to a LBS. They will make sure that you get a bike that fits and will meet your purposes. They will build it, service it, teach you how to you use it, even help you find people to ride with if you'd like that.
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Old 07-10-18, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Donagh View Post
We will be primarily using them on both paved park trails and rougher gravel, paths. Perhaps some trails with holes and roots, but not really 'mountain trails'.
Every major bike brand will have models suited to the riding conditions you describe. The Raleigh Redux has wide (47 mm) tires that you can run at low pressures to provide some cushion on gravel trails. I run the same tires on my Priority-brand bicycles, and I like the wider tires a lot. (I favor wider tires and lower pressures over having a suspension fork). Trek has the FX series that is popular for fitness riding and rail trails and those sort of things. Avoid the Schwinn Protocol. It has rear suspension, and you will hate rear suspension at that price point. The Schwinn High Timber looks fine and is suitable for rail trails and gravel, but suspension forks like the one on that bike always end up worn out and wobbly.
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Old 07-10-18, 04:09 PM
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Donagh
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OK, thanks guys. The info on the forks getting wobbly and the advoice to avoid rear suspension on the lower-end model bikes was helpful. We may even buy a few used (but better) bikes to begin, and then upgrade if we feel it’s something we want to pursue more seriously.

I found formulas and charts for bike-size/body-size to help find the right fit. I believe I read somewhere on this forum a member saying that if you don’t have the correct bike size, merely adjusting the seat and handlebars won’t really give you the best performance. I spent most of my life on a bike from age 5 till about 22, but that was a LONG time ago, so I feel confident in saying I know absolutely NOTHING about bikes today. Thanks for the helpful responses.

-D
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Old 07-11-18, 06:24 AM
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You're probably medium maybe large, she's probably a small.
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