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Best portable pump to get to 70 PSI?

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Best portable pump to get to 70 PSI?

Old 08-01-18, 07:03 PM
  #1  
tyrion
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Best portable pump to get to 70 PSI?

Need a new carry-with-me-pump, my tires range from 700 x 35-42mm, want to get to 70 PSI as easy as possible.

https://silca.cc/products/tattico-mini-pump $55

https://www.topeak.com/global/de/pro...ountain-morph- $35

Lezyne - Engineered Design - Products - Hand Pumps - High Volume - HV Drive - $30

Weight isn't much of an issue (as long as it's under 1 pound).

What other models should I be looking at?
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Old 08-01-18, 07:08 PM
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I have experience with Topeak pumps so I'd recommend the Mountain Morph. It operates like a mini floor pump.
Lazyne pumps receive very good reviews so I'd consider that one too.
Itty bitty mini pumps will get your tire up to 70 PSI but they can take a LOT of strokes to get there because they lack output volume.
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Old 08-01-18, 07:47 PM
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Any of the Topeak Morphs. I've got a TurboMorph for my 26x1.75, it runs a bit faster than my RoadMorph, and I've also got a MiniDual G that I keep on the fatty, but all are great pumps.
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Old 08-01-18, 07:59 PM
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I have this Topeak:

https://www.performancebike.com/shop...i-pump-40-5466

I like the gauge feature. It will get my 700 X 38 to 50 pounds fine. Anything higher and you will have to wear yourself out doing it. I ride at 70 PSI but on a flat I am willing to go with 50+ to get me home. I also ride with CO2. I have the pump only for Rails-to-Trails rides where I am in the boonies miles from any support. Meaning if CO2 does not cut it, then the pump will.
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Old 08-01-18, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
Itty bitty mini pumps will get your tire up to 70 PSI but they can take a LOT of strokes to get there because they lack output volume.
I had an itty bitty one - just got stolen. In hindsight, maybe that was good thing.

edit: I learned a lesson from that itty bitty one - I'm willing to carry an extra quarter pound for easier pumping.

Last edited by tyrion; 08-01-18 at 08:10 PM.
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Old 08-01-18, 11:06 PM
  #6  
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I'm satisfied with the Topeak Race Rocket HP for my hybrids, with 700x40 tires up to 70 psi. Takes about 200 or more strokes but it works. If I had to buy another pump I'd get the mountain bike version of the Race Rocket, the fatter higher volume tube.

But a frame pump that can be braced against the ground would be more efficient. With my busted up shoulders I'm just lucky I haven't had a flat recently and needed to use those mini pumps on my road bike. I really should get a CO2 inflator.
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Old 08-02-18, 02:27 AM
  #7  
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Saw a cool foot-pump that was ultra small on kickstarter the other day, cant remember what it was called though
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Old 08-02-18, 05:50 AM
  #8  
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Many of us who tour swear by the Topeak Road Morph G, but it may be too large for your liking. I use it to get my 700x37c tires up to 85 lbs.
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Old 08-02-18, 09:29 AM
  #9  
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Topeak Mountain Morph (or road morph). It's the only pump in that list that will get a 35c tire to 70psi with a reasonable amount of effort.

That being said, I personally carry the mini morph, because:
- It gets a 25c tire to 60psi, which is enough to ride home on
- I almost never get flats since flat-resistant tires
- It fits into my rack-top bag easily so I can keep everything I need in the bag (don't leave stuff on the bike when I lock it up and leave it outside)

Mini Morph reasonable max: 25c 60psi
Road/Mountain morph reasonable max: any pressure modern tires need
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Old 08-02-18, 09:36 AM
  #10  
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Best?

Long Frame Fit Pumps, because of their stroke length ,
are the best at achieving higher pressure ,
Best of the type were hand made in Titanium , replicas of Italian Silca impero ,
using the Steel pump head, made by Campagnolo.
now retired Bruce Gordon had them .. then..

now with just the 2 links offered by OP , there is one frame fit ..





...

Last edited by fietsbob; 08-02-18 at 09:43 AM.
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Old 08-02-18, 09:43 AM
  #11  
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There are a bunch of mini- and super-mini pumps that will get you 120 psi in a 23-mm tire and many of them have high-volume switches.

I have some Lezyne thing that I use as my shop hand-pump which has a hose rather than a direct connector, and I like it. With a pop-on head it is possible to bend a valve-stem if one is in a hurry and a little careless ... say at the end of a long hard ride, focusing on hauling his aching body the last ten miles to home. So the hose is handy in that situation.

I usually scan the close-outs and sales at various bike sites and wait for name-brand pumps to sell for cheap, because I like to have one on every bike (because the pump I leave at home always get to zero psi.) Anything by Topeak, Blackburn, or Lezyne ought to work. Check the specs carefully, look for a high-volume option.
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Old 08-02-18, 10:04 AM
  #12  
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Stroke length has nothing to do with how high a pressure you can achieve. Bore size (cylinder/piston diameter) is what determines how much strength you will have to just to get to the desired pressure. Stroke length simply determines how fast that particular bore size can file up a tire.

So if conventional frame pumps aren't getting to the pressure you want, then perhaps you've been looking at the ones that also are made with bigger bores that fill the tire with more air per stroke but make it harder to get to high pressures when you can't put an end on the ground and use your body weight as you do with a conventional floor pump.

Isn't there enough room on your Novara Randonee to put a frame pump behind the seat post? Or perhaps like me you think it detracts from the aesthetics. The other solution might be to carry CO2 inflator as well as a small bag size pump to top off the tire when the CO2 doesn't quite get you there.

What pump to recommend I have no idea other than to simply consider smaller bores make it easier to get to pressure but require more strokes to get the air in. Larger bores will get you more air in the tire quicker, but will be harder to obtain the desired pressure if you can't put one end on the ground and use your weight.
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Old 08-02-18, 10:48 AM
  #13  
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This is my favorite MTB/Bikepacking/Touring pump. The one downside as is also noted in the review is the cap can unscrew from the main tube. I knew this from day one and when I first bought the pump I put a single wrap of electrical tape around the cap and it has never become loose in my use. One time in a bad incident of road debris I pumped up 4 MTB tires one after the other with this pump.

Lezyne Micro Floor Drive HP/HPG - Adventure Bike Touring

Edit: Sorry this review is for the HP(High Pressure). You would want the HV(High Volume) version of the same pump.
Lezyne - Engineered Design - Products - Hand Pumps - High Volume - Micro Floor Drive HV/HVG
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Old 08-02-18, 12:32 PM
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Unless ypu want a fullnsized pump for the look, the concersation should start and end with topeak road/mountain morph with guage.

last week I used mine about 10 times to help others during flats.
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Old 08-02-18, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Stroke length has nothing to do with how high a pressure you can achieve. Bore size (cylinder/piston diameter) is what determines how much strength you will have to just to get to the desired pressure. Stroke length simply determines how fast that particular bore size can file up a tire.
I've tried to get a 700c 25mm road bike tire above 60psi with a road morph mini and it was next to impossible. The pump requires increasing amounts of force to even push down and the tire seems to slow in how much air it's taking.

In contrast with the full size road morph it's just a matter of how long you have to do it for.

I don't know if someone knows a better technique than I do, or is stronger, or what, but I could not get a road bike tire above about 60psi with one of the smaller pumps. Works fine emergency flat repair and finishing the ride though.
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Old 08-02-18, 02:35 PM
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Consider expanding your choices to the Zephal frame pumps. Very good pumps. They may require a few more strokes to get large tires to 70 psi but if you ever decide to switch to narrow road tires and go to pressures greater than 100 psi. those pumps will do it in their sleep. They last a very long time, even as every day users. (I owned only the previous version of those pumps in my racing days, riding sewups on all my bike. I rode 15 years on those pumps before I got a floor pump (and didn't own a car).

Ben
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Old 08-02-18, 02:41 PM
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Spend the money and get the Silca. Best pump I've ever used and I have tried dozens and dozens.
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Old 08-02-18, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Stroke length has nothing to do with how high a pressure you can achieve. Bore size (cylinder/piston diameter) is what determines how much strength you will have to just to get to the desired pressure. Stroke length simply determines how fast that particular bore size can file up a tire.

...
Not true, With a short stroke, you end up with a very small volume of high pressure air. Some of that volume stays in the pump head and hose and never makes to to the tire. You start with a volume of say 10 units in your pump. As the tire pressure goes up. that 10 units must be compressed more and more. Eventually the required compression means that your compressed volume is below that residual space in your pump beyond the plunger gasket. At that point, nothing is happening. Now, if, say, your pump has 20 units of volume, at the same pressure, with the came residual space in the pump. half that compressed air has to go somewhere - into the tire. You can see this clearly with full sized frame pumps that come in different lengths to fit different bikes. Longer is better, Every time.

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Old 08-02-18, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Greyhounds View Post
Spend the money and get the Silca. Best pump I've ever used and I have tried dozens and dozens.
My Zephal used to be the choice pump to actually use on rides when everybody else carried Silcas. (Well, not by everyone. But by everyone who had tried to get 115 psi+ with both pumps.)

Oh, Edit: I should say that my comments here and above only apply to the HP, HPX and "Classic" models with their excellent locks, not to the models with hoses.

Ben
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Old 08-03-18, 04:12 AM
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Its about the rider. If the rider has good size forearms, then that's where the "strokes" are getting their power. If not, the the rider needs to depend on what the Topeak Morph is designed to do: use leg and weight to power the strokes.

As I watch demonstrations on You Tube, some are not in optimum form. At the down stroke, the legs and upper body are not in unison. Body weight and not arm power is what gives the power to each stroke of the floor pumps.
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Old 08-03-18, 06:02 PM
  #21  
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Like the zephal hpx as well.
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Old 08-03-18, 06:50 PM
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I have the Lezyne. It's compact and efficient.
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Old 08-04-18, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by tyrion View Post
Need a new carry-with-me-pump, my tires range from 700 x 35-42mm, want to get to 70 PSI as easy as possible.

https://silca.cc/products/tattico-mini-pump $55

https://www.topeak.com/global/de/pro...ountain-morph- $35

Lezyne - Engineered Design - Products - Hand Pumps - High Volume - HV Drive - $30

Weight isn't much of an issue (as long as it's under 1 pound).

What other models should I be looking at?
The Topeak Morph is about the best pump around. For your application, however, I would suggest the Road Morph. It develops higher pressure. The Mountain Morph is a good low pressure/high volume pump but not all that great for higher pressures.

The Lezyne that danmyersmn mentioned above is also a good choice although the handle of the Lezyne is less comfortable to use than the Topeaks.
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Old 08-04-18, 09:16 AM
  #24  
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I have Zefal frame-fitting pumps on all my bikes - they're light, easy to use, and just work. No problem getting a decent pressure in the tyres.
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Old 08-04-18, 10:24 AM
  #25  
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I have a Crank Brothers pump which fits my trunk bag. It has High Volume/High Pressure settings selectable by a twist of the handle.

It can also fit Schrader or Presta by twisting the valve end. It also has a pressure gauge incorporated.

Bought it 10 years ago, so I don't remember which model, looks like the Gem, but is black
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