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Eliminating cleated shoe hotspot by replacing shoe

Old 08-17-18, 08:17 AM
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Eliminating cleated shoe hotspot by replacing shoe

currently working on eliminating a hotspot on just my right foot now that I have been using cleated pedals. I believe I had an inkling of the issue while still using 1/2 clips. but now that I've been using cleated pedals with the same shoe I've been thinking of replacing the shoes

so my questions is, has anyone had a similar problem which they fixed by changing their shoe entirely? or who has a super comfy MTB cleated shoe w no hotspots?

my hotspot is on the upper right, involving the pinky toe but also just below it, so not just the pinky toe. I've done a cpl things that have helped, moved foot forward, cleat backward so less likely to point foot down, changed pedals, more platform for shoe to rest on but don't think that's actually happening, am changing how I rest & roll, meaning with that foot up instead of down, meaning trying to be more balanced & not so dominant on that foot in general. also using body glide & sock liner on that foot (last ride was good, got home w/o any burning) I think moving the cleats was the biggest help & will try a shim when they arrive in the mail, but on the off-chance a really long ride is uncomfortable, maybe I can justify new shoes! :-)


I know the angle is different, but I think this 1st video shows my toes pointing down more than they do now


hoping the wedges come before my next ride. just read this article, so hoping they wil help

https://blog.bikefit.com/why-wedge

Last edited by rumrunn6; 08-17-18 at 02:33 PM.
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Old 08-17-18, 09:20 AM
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Have you tried moving the cleat sideways? It can maybe help to spread the loss more evenly across your foot.
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Old 08-17-18, 09:29 AM
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YMMV but I changed to a stiffer shoe and that eliminated most of my issues. I used to literally have to take my shoe OFF my foot on rides > 75 miles but no more!

I went from a sidi genius 5 to a sidi kaos, so the stiffness improvement was probably pretty minor. Go figure.

I also changed pedal systems in January from speedplay to Look Keo, which has a larger pedal platform, that may have provided a benefit as well.

You might want to engage a fitter to help you get your shoe fit sorted (cleat position, shims etc)
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Old 08-17-18, 09:33 AM
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I have big feet. US14. The first ~10k miles in some Giro Republics went well enough. Then the hotspots started. And I mean pull to the side of the road and sit in the grass with my shoes off for five minutes level pain.

I tried every cleat position, I tried different pedals, different socks, you name it. Nothing helped. Riding more than 25-30 miles had mandatory breaks for my feet.

Replaced then with full carbon soled shoes. Haven't had a problem since. Plenty of comfortable, VERY stiff soled shoes out there. I have some Giro Code Techlace that literally feel like tennis shoes.

Go with the stiffest soled shoe you can find, really. The flexing sole was the complete cause of my hotspots.
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Old 08-17-18, 10:01 AM
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I think, because an MTB SPuD shoe surrounds the cleat pocket with rubber, for walking traction.

it compresses on contact with the pedal ends, so the cleat & mounting plate is pushed up unequally

a hard sole road shoe, with the SPD cleat & pontoons would not act like that
but you really cannot walk in them much. (local Spinning Class leader Recommended those)




...
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Old 08-17-18, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by alias5000
Have you tried moving the cleat sideways? It can maybe help to spread the loss more evenly across your foot.
not yet, I haven't read or seen any suggestions for that. wonder which way to move it EDIT just read, for this condition, to move the cleat inward

Last edited by rumrunn6; 08-17-18 at 02:47 PM.
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Old 08-17-18, 02:12 PM
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Try a Profoot Miracle Insole and the thinnest socks you can find, even if they're anklets. That's what worked for me.

In January I got my first clipess pedals (old style delta Look) and shoes. The Scott shoes were rated 7-8 on some stiffness scale for soles, pretty rigid -- much more rigid than my old Detto Pietro shoes. The Scott shoes included an insole with detachable supports for the arch and plantar areas. At first the shoes were comfortable.

But as I got accustomed to the Scott shoes and pushed harder, I began getting hot spots in the right foot sole, and numbness on both little toes.

I tried the original insoles with and without the detachable supports. I added Dr. Scholl gel half-insoles. I tried different thicknesses of socks, including layering socks. I'd adjust the straps during rides. Nothing really helped consistently.

When the weather warmed up this spring I switched to very thin poly wicking fabric anklets. That helped relieve the pressure that caused numbness in the little toes.

Then Walgreens had the Profoot Miracle Insole on sale for $8. I tried it. That solved the hot spot and numbness problem.

These Scott shoes are really for summer use, very well vented. I tried to make them work for winter use and the thicker socks only caused more problems with compressing and restricting blood flow. Loosening the straps didn't solve the problem.

The Profoot isn't another gel insole. It's more like resilient, dense (resisting compression) but thin rubbery stuff.

I've always had difficult feet -- very narrow, usually A or B width with most shoes, high arches, very prone to cramping and hot spots. I've tried a lot of orthotics, including some custom made orthotics. The Profoot Miracle Insole works as well as anything else I've used.
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Old 08-17-18, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by TrojanHorse
YMMV but I changed to a stiffer shoe and that eliminated most of my issues. I used to literally have to take my shoe OFF my foot on rides > 75 miles but no more!

I went from a sidi genius 5 to a sidi kaos, so the stiffness improvement was probably pretty minor. Go figure.

I also changed pedal systems in January from speedplay to Look Keo, which has a larger pedal platform, that may have provided a benefit as well.

You might want to engage a fitter to help you get your shoe fit sorted (cleat position, shims etc)

Yea. SPDs IMHO really need stiff shoes. Anything less asks for hotspots. Even Sidi has a few odd ones like the Epic/SD15 that has no shank whatsoever (you can literally bend the show in half to no ill effect with your bare hands).
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Old 08-17-18, 02:40 PM
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wonder where my shoes fall in the stiffness scale Lake Cycling 2015 Men's MX100 Mountain Bike Shoes (Black/Grey - 48)

EDIT: finally got my hands on some genuine rigid bike shoes. comparing them to mine, mine should be fine. they are quite rigid, so the sole/shank is/was not the issue

Last edited by rumrunn6; 08-22-18 at 12:34 PM.
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Old 08-17-18, 05:05 PM
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I got some superfeet carbon insoles for my sidi dominator mega shoes. they feel great now.
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Old 08-17-18, 05:10 PM
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Sidi Genius user here. I get hotspots with my Specialized Sworks carbon shoes. Sole stiffness rated at 12. Too much. The more pliable nylon sole of the Sidi is more friendly to my feet. I fashioned a metatarsal support button from folded napkin and duct tape for the Sidi. Now they are perfect for me.

I say this because each person has different issues stemming from different inputs and what works for one does not necessarily work for another.

First thing to do is change your pedal stroke. Instead of keeping steady pressure on the pedal, relax the foot as it starts to rise from the down stroke. In a way let the hamstrings pull it up. This takes a lot of practice.
Second thing to do is use lower gears to enable a spin rather than up/down pedal stroke. Slow down, learn to spin, then learn to spin larger gears to get the speed back up.

Note: I am not a podiatrist nor a physical doctor.

These two things relieve pressure on the bottom of the feet and allow blood to flow through the foot. The lack of blood flow is the hot foot feeling.

Now, after this look to the shoes, however proper support of the metatarsals is essential and should be addressed before purchasing replacement shoes. Supporting the metatarsals prevents the bones from falling in on each other when pushing down, thus preventing irritated nerves and loss of blood flow.

Last, but not least, an experienced fitter that really understands the foot can provide guidance and should be consulted if your efforts prove ineffective. Do this before ;purchasing new shoes.
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Old 08-17-18, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Marcus_Ti
Yea. SPDs IMHO really need stiff shoes. Anything less asks for hotspots. Even Sidi has a few odd ones like the Epic/SD15 that has no shank whatsoever (you can literally bend the show in half to no ill effect with your bare hands).
Marcus has this correct and mirrors my experiences of a few decades of SPD use on a road bike doing longer mileage. My version of Hot Spot is an inflammation in the nerve at the joint of the smallest toe with the metatarsal bone. An Ortho Doc essentially told me in may case it’s likely the result of the tendons, ligaments etc.., in the middle of the foot stretching over time, that results in greater pressure on the outside of the foot. Compounded by generally poor foot support from the SPD shoe/cleat design. Using SPD-L pedals, cleats and shoes is an improvement and allowed greater distance rides without pain, excepting I hated the single sided clip in system.

I then went back to SPD and use a stiffer Shimano shoe, the XC7 in this case, which has a carbon mid sole. Problem mostly solved, though as it’s a constant foot issue, not just cycling related, I need to wear foot support pads designed to support the middle of the foot at the toes. They sell these at CVS etc... if I use them daily, my feet do feel better. But I’m good to 50 miles or so without pain these days and that was my goal.
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Old 08-22-18, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by TiHabanero
change your pedal stroke
fyi started experimenting with that, also how I might be leaning on that right foot cuz I'm a right-hand-dominant type ...
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Old 08-22-18, 12:43 PM
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shoes may be too tight... hopefully not causing a nerve problem that won't go away with a change of shoes--e.g., https://www.health.harvard.edu/feet-...ortons-neuroma
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Old 08-22-18, 01:22 PM
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Eliminate all possibilities before you go blowing money on new shoes and pedals when you have no clue if they will solve the problem. You're gambling your money away. One thing most people don't even think about is an unnatural foot tilt, and a wedge solves the hot spot issue. I have a wedge under the insole of my left shoe. A decent bike shop should be able to measure your feet.





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Old 08-22-18, 01:39 PM
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Originally Posted by McBTC
shoes may be too tight
thanks, the size is good & I lace them carefully. meaning tried looser & tighter but now think I have the lacing OK
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Old 08-22-18, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Lazyass
One thing most people don't even think about is an unnatural foot tilt, and a wedge solves the hot spot issue. I have a wedge under the insole of my left shoe
wedge came in the mail, gonna add it before my next ride
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Old 08-22-18, 02:04 PM
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Beginnings of neuropathy or diabetic nerve damage?
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Old 08-22-18, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6
wedge came in the mail, gonna add it before my next ride
I checked my own feet after I read about it a couple of years ago. You can actually feel a bone sticking down on the edge of my foot right behind my little toe. A wedge instantly cured hotspots. What's messed up is that I was on active duty as an infantryman from '86-'10. All those years I dealt with killer pain in my left foot every time I went on a road march loaded down with tons of gear or whatever, running, in addition to cycling. I just sucked it up and lived with it. All that time a simple wedge would have cured it.
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Old 08-23-18, 07:48 AM
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got the little wedges, looks like I'm gonna have to trial&error my way to figuring out how many to use. 1 looks insignificant, 2 or 3 might be the ticket ...?


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Old 08-23-18, 10:19 AM
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I think TiHabanero probably has the answer based on my experience and the experience of boot fitters from the skiing world. Those fitters take a professional level course developed by podiatrists and years of experience in fitting professional skiers. The problem arises with performance footwear where a skier at high speed must effect the attitude of skis accurately and instantly. Obviously a loose fitting boot will not get the job done. A loose bike shoe will also dissipate some energy. For this reason performance shoes fit snugly and if too snug, foot bones are crunched together. There are numerous techniques available for ski boots such as heat moldable insulated liners. Another is a metatarsal pad, ( this, together with a wedged shim, is what worked for me). https://soleessentialsfootcare.com/m...SABEgIG6vD_BwE
The pads are inexpensive and available over the counter at any pharmacy, so a common problem.
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Old 08-24-18, 10:06 AM
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Added three shims between the cleat & shoe I think they helped

so I think the things I’ve done were correct & appropriate but funny thing while having no discomfort while riding 32 miles last night, there was some while walking at the 1/2 way point

will be keeping an eye out for shoes. I've got more than 1 shirt, shorts, socks, bikes etc ... makes sense to have more than 1 pair of cleated cycling shoes

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Old 08-26-18, 12:59 AM
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It's definitely the shoes. Our sponsor used to supply us with Carnac shoes, which were sexy, and expensive. They gave me hot spots on both feet. We had been using Sidi shoes, and though those too gave me hot spots, I could live with it. I replaced my Carnac shoes with Shimano's top-of-the-range carbon-fibre shoes, and the hot spots when away. On the downside, they were heavier than the Carnacs.
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Old 08-26-18, 04:40 AM
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You have no clue at all if it is his shoes. That's like saying no one will be comfortable on X saddle just because you aren't.
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Old 04-23-19, 01:33 PM
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got a MTB the end of last summer so didn't ride the road bike too much after the final adjustments. did a cpl hrs on the road bike this spring a cpl weeks ago. I sensed that same hot spot walking, getting ready to leave the house, so put on a sock liner. the ride was fine, no discomfort. found a new pair of shoes for a reasonable price & hoping to try them in the next cpl of weeks. the toe box has a different shape. should be interesting

EDIT: 1st field test w new cleated Giro shoes. I like them! no hot spots! no shims!



the rounder toe box is definitely more comfortable that the more pointy Lake shoes


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