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I know this is stupid but how do I change gear?

Old 08-31-18, 08:36 AM
  #1  
JessicaSinclair
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I know this is stupid but how do I change gear?

I've just purchased a 2018 Giant Roam Disc 1? Had it delivered but trying to read the manual is really hard as the manual is so vague and non specific on bike model? I dont have normal road bike i have a pretend mountain bike called Giant Roam could someone please send me to a video on youtube on how to change gear with my exact same gear and bike?

There's a slow leak with my tires luckily the dealership is going to replace them for me ... and sometimes when i am riding along the bike changes gear by itself is that normal or did i do something wrong and the gear changed into gear by itself?

This forum wont let me post my photos of the bike it says i need to have at least 10 posts
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Old 08-31-18, 08:39 AM
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Your bike shouldn't be changing gears on its own. You need to have a bike mechanic make the proper adjustments.
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Old 08-31-18, 08:40 AM
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Old 08-31-18, 08:45 AM
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This one?

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/roam-1-disc

It has Shimano Deore shifters which means they are mounted under your handlebars inwards from the hand grips. Each shifter should have one paddle that is easily pushed by your thumb and will shift to bigger cogs/easier gears in back and bigger rings/harder gears in front. Each shifter should also have a trigger for your index finger that will shift in the other direction. If you're getting "ghost shifts," it's probably in need of a simple adjustment of cable tension; I'd recommend you have the bike shop take a look when they fix your leaky tires. Also, you should watch them fix your flats or even do one while they watch so you can take care of flats yourself if you get one when you are out riding. Honestly, they should have shown you how the gears work when you bought it-ask them for help with that while you're there, too. Good luck!
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Old 08-31-18, 08:48 AM
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The components on that bike are pretty decent. Deore is decent quality. It sounds like the rear derailer just needs adjusted. It shouldn't be jumping gears on its own. That is something you usually see after many miles when the chain starts stretching and the rear cassette is badly worn. But it sounds like this is a brand new bike, so none of that would be possible.
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Old 08-31-18, 09:02 AM
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Ok thank you they said the first service is free before xmas and also they will replace my tires for me so i will ask them to check and fix the chain jumping gear problem.

They said they are aware of the tire problem as it kept going flat on them in the show room but i am a bit disturbed they didn't change the tire before they delivered the bike to my house.

I hope i made the right choice maybe i should have bought one of the Livs.
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Old 08-31-18, 09:05 AM
  #7  
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Originally Posted by Jared1970 View Post
The components on that bike are pretty decent. Deore is decent quality. It sounds like the rear derailer just needs adjusted. It shouldn't be jumping gears on its own. That is something you usually see after many miles when the chain starts stretching and the rear cassette is badly worn. But it sounds like this is a brand new bike, so none of that would be possible.
I went in to look at one of the Liv bikes but they told me this 2018 Giant Roam Disc 1 had better components and it's reduced to $699 from $1099 that's why i bought it.
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Old 08-31-18, 09:43 AM
  #8  
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Originally Posted by JessicaSinclair View Post
I went in to look at one of the Liv bikes but they told me this 2018 Giant Roam Disc 1 had better components and it's reduced to $699 from $1099 that's why i bought it.
Thats fine- not the issue. The things you describe could happen to any bike. The concern is why they sold you a bike with a flat and were like “yeah, idk, kept happening to me too duh” and also didn’t bother to find out whether it was properly adjusted AND whether you knew how to use it. Complete laziness & lack of professionalism.
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Old 08-31-18, 10:06 AM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by Charliekeet View Post


Thats fine- not the issue. The things you describe could happen to any bike. The concern is why they sold you a bike with a flat and were like “yeah, idk, kept happening to me too duh” and also didn’t bother to find out whether it was properly adjusted AND whether you knew how to use it. Complete laziness & lack of professionalism.

I certainly wouldn't take anything there that wasn't covered by warrantee. Don't know whether it's a case of they don't care or they don't know any better, but either way they don't sound trustworthy.
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Old 08-31-18, 10:37 AM
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Maybe it's simply a case where no body is doing anything sketchy, rather assumptions were made on both sides.

Before dismissing the shop as a bunch of careless hacks, take the bike back and tell them that you don't know how to use the bike correctly and would appreciate some instruction. Be polite, be clear, don't assume they know or recognize your needs. Their response will make it crystal clear what your customer/dealer relationship is.

If their response is anything less than "Sure, I will be glad to help you in anyway I can" Leave and never go back.
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Old 08-31-18, 11:36 AM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by JessicaSinclair View Post

They said they are aware of the tire problem as it kept going flat on them in the show room but i am a bit disturbed they didn't change the tire before they delivered the bike to my house.

I hope i made the right choice maybe i should have bought one of the Livs.
It is most likely not a tire problem, but a RIM problem, with a spoke hole exposed or perhaps a sharp edge around the valve stem hole.
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Old 08-31-18, 11:49 AM
  #12  
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Benefit of the doubt.
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Old 08-31-18, 12:12 PM
  #13  
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Pull off your jersey and bibs the same way you pulled them on, but in reverse ... the pull on a different set.
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Old 08-31-18, 12:41 PM
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I basically did a google and youtube search for "How to adjust Rear Derailleur SHIMANO DEORE" found only 1 video but the guy couldn't speak English too well and his video wasn't very good which made it even more confusing.

This Deore derailleur is not like other brand where you can easily adjust it to line up the indexing
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Old 08-31-18, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by JessicaSinclair View Post
I basically did a google and youtube search for "How to adjust Rear Derailleur SHIMANO DEORE" found only 1 video but the guy couldn't speak English too well and his video wasn't very good which made it even more confusing.

This Deore derailleur is not like other brand where you can easily adjust it to line up the indexing
https://www.bing.com/search?q=adjust...16&FORM=CHROMN Funny ... i got a whole couple pages fo videos. I bet Shimano has some too.

Plus, if you bought a bike at a shop and it doesn't work YOU TAKE IT BACK.

The shop has an obligation to sell you a working bicycle and cannot sell you a non-functional bike and charge you extra to fix it.

That is common sense.

So ... if you are real ... post the receipt from the shop for the sale of the bike (blank out whatever info you need so as not to identify yourself) and then in a couple days, post the receipt of the repair.
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Old 08-31-18, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by JessicaSinclair View Post
I basically did a google and youtube search for "How to adjust Rear Derailleur SHIMANO DEORE" found only 1 video but the guy couldn't speak English too well and his video wasn't very good which made it even more confusing.

This Deore derailleur is not like other brand where you can easily adjust it to line up the indexing
Checkout GCN (The Global Cycling Network) and GMBN (Global Mtn Bike Network) and their maintenance/How to? videos. All kinds of info videos in English on how to adjust your rear DR-cogs. Easy to learn and apply while you test ride and fine tune your gear shifting. Takes practice but worth the time for better trouble-free rides.
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Old 08-31-18, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by JessicaSinclair View Post
. . . could someone please send me to a video . . . .(
Here's one:

At one point in the video he gives some good advice -- just get out there on a path or somewhere easy and practice shifting until you get the hang of it.

Good luck!
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Old 08-31-18, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by JessicaSinclair View Post
This Deore derailleur is not like other brand where you can easily adjust it to line up the indexing
This implies that the OP knows how to adjust a rear derailleur but for some reason the Deore is the One in the whole world which is different.

I am not saying anything about anything... but I think a lot of us are hearing the same message.
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Old 08-31-18, 02:57 PM
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Old 08-31-18, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by JessicaSinclair View Post
Ok thank you they said the first service is free before xmas and also they will replace my tires for me so i will ask them to check and fix the chain jumping gear problem.

They said they are aware of the tire problem as it kept going flat on them in the show room but i am a bit disturbed they didn't change the tire before they delivered the bike to my house.

I hope i made the right choice maybe i should have bought one of the Livs.
The chain jumping problem is common on new bikes. It takes a little time for the cables to settle in and when they do, they are a little loose so the derailer doesn't align properly. It's a easy fix and why they offer a "tune up".

As to the tire, are you sure you heard correctly? Bicycle tires lose pressure over time. All tires lose pressure over time, for that matter, but bicycle tires lose it more quickly. It's a law of nature call Hooke's Law of Diffusion. Basically, it states that gases in high pressure vessels will diffuse out to lower pressure. Tires are only mostly impermeable to air so a little air diffuses through the wall of the tire. The higher pressure, smaller surface area and thinner materials of a bicycle tire means that the air diffuses out more quickly than automobile tires.

Bottom line, you need to fill up your tires more often...usually about once a week or more. Many people just fill the tires before a ride because the tire likely need it.

For shifting, the video above covers it nicely. I would add that you should consider the front shifting (left side) as coarse adjustment...it makes big jumps between the gears...while the rear shifting (right side) makes fine adjustments. For example, If you find yourself riding up a hill and the hill stays steady, shift down on the back (to the large cogs) to make pedaling easier. If the hill suddenly steepens, shift down in the front to the smaller rings. As the top the hill and start down the other side, shift up on the front as your speed increases and then fine tune on the rear cogs.

Go out and practice. Shifting won't hurt anything so shift a lot and get used to the feeling.
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Old 08-31-18, 05:19 PM
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Hey, Cyccommute, thanks for introducing me to Hooke's Law of Diffusion. High school and college physics are little tiny points in my rear view mirror, but I do enjoy revisiting that stuff once in a while.

For the OP, I pump the tires every time I ride my road bike. My wife's hybrid and my son's mountain bike have larger tires and tend to stay full a little bit longer, but you really do have to check them frequently.
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Old 08-31-18, 09:50 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
The chain jumping problem is common on new bikes. It takes a little time for the cables to settle in and when they do, they are a little loose so the derailer doesn't align properly. It's a easy fix and why they offer a "tune up".

As to the tire, are you sure you heard correctly? Bicycle tires lose pressure over time. All tires lose pressure over time, for that matter, but bicycle tires lose it more quickly. It's a law of nature call Hooke's Law of Diffusion. Basically, it states that gases in high pressure vessels will diffuse out to lower pressure. Tires are only mostly impermeable to air so a little air diffuses through the wall of the tire. The higher pressure, smaller surface area and thinner materials of a bicycle tire means that the air diffuses out more quickly than automobile tires.

Bottom line, you need to fill up your tires more often...usually about once a week or more. Many people just fill the tires before a ride because the tire likely need it.

For shifting, the video above covers it nicely. I would add that you should consider the front shifting (left side) as coarse adjustment...it makes big jumps between the gears...while the rear shifting (right side) makes fine adjustments. For example, If you find yourself riding up a hill and the hill stays steady, shift down on the back (to the large cogs) to make pedaling easier. If the hill suddenly steepens, shift down in the front to the smaller rings. As the top the hill and start down the other side, shift up on the front as your speed increases and then fine tune on the rear cogs.

Go out and practice. Shifting won't hurt anything so shift a lot and get used to the feeling.


Thank you for the video and regarding the tire it's all sorted my husband took the bike to the shop to get it fixed as well as the rear derailleur alignment.

This forum wont let me quote some replies so thanks to everyone
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Old 09-01-18, 07:18 AM
  #23  
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Consider buying a floor pump with gauge to top off your tires as needed.
There will be a suggested tire pressure on the sidewall of the tire. No need to pump to the max pressure.
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Old 09-02-18, 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Homebrew01 View Post
Consider buying a floor pump with gauge to top off your tires as needed.
There will be a suggested tire pressure on the sidewall of the tire. No need to pump to the max pressure.
I looked at Presta Inflator and i was wondering if you guys could tell me which air compressor i should buy with Presta Inflator?

I believe in have Presta Valve would i be wrong to assume that because i have checked a few videos on which valves i actually have ??

My other question is will Presta Inflator work with gas station pumps?

BTW my rear tire is completely flat today I think i might also have faulty rear tire !!!
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Old 09-02-18, 01:02 PM
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Gas station pumps use Schrader ... adapters are about a dollar.

if you have a bad tube .. . this is the perfect time to learn how to change a tube, and to learn how to patch a tube. You are very lucky.

There are dozens of videos online.
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