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Suggestions for high-quality, fast 32 or 35 mm tires and rims?

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Suggestions for high-quality, fast 32 or 35 mm tires and rims?

Old 11-12-18, 10:45 PM
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el forestero
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Suggestions for high-quality, fast 32 or 35 mm tires and rims?

Currently running Bontrager AT-750 alloy rims and 700x35c H2 Hard-Case Lite tires. Would love to hear suggestions on an upgraded set of 32 to 35 mm rims and tires for long-distance (100 to 160 km) recreational rides on roads.

Last edited by el forestero; 11-12-18 at 10:46 PM. Reason: added detail
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Old 11-13-18, 04:50 AM
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Vision 40 Metro wheels and Bontrager AW3 32mm tires are working great for me. I would have gone with Continental GP4000s but they didn't come in 32mm - the new 5000s do, might try them next, but they are a good deal more expensive than the AW3s.
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Old 11-13-18, 05:09 AM
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Originally Posted by el forestero View Post
Currently running Bontrager AT-750 alloy rims and 700x35c H2 Hard-Case Lite tires. Would love to hear suggestions on an upgraded set of 32 to 35 mm rims and tires for long-distance (100 to 160 km) recreational rides on roads.
Are you prioritising speed over puncture protection for a change of tires? Your current tires are very heavy. I’m not sure you’d need to invest in new rims if you simply replace your tires. You’re cutrently running ‘hybrid’ tires. This is fine for things like short jaunts, city commuting, that sort of thing. But for more proper open road riding, it’s your tires that will be holding you back, not your rims.

There are a plethora of good, lightweight, fast tires in 32mm. 35 is usually a size reserved for more ‘utility’ tires. But it’s going to be hard to offer recommendations with so little info to work with. Things like your weight, the type of roads will be riding on, is there a higher chance of punctures from debris or things like thorns? Could you be prone to pinch flats if you move down to a smaller tire? (Related to your weight) budget, willing to spend? Can you fit a tire larger than 35mm?

most of us can really only make recommendations based on our own experiences and the tires we ride on. One of my favourite daily ride tires, is the 32mm Panaracer GravelKing (slick version). These tires offer puncture protection, are fast rolling and very lightweight by comparison to your tires. (290g per tire, vs your tires at 635g. Or to put it another way, your tires together weigh about 3 pounds, mine weigh 1.3 pounds) I’ll say this: most good quality tires, even performance tires typically have some form of puncture protection. It’s hard to buy a set today that doesn’t. But the bottom line is that your tires are heavy. Very heavy. This means the list of upgrades is a really long one. This means nearly any ‘performance’ tire will feel like a massive upgrade. without some more info, it’s going to be difficult to narrow things down.
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Old 11-13-18, 05:09 AM
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the new Continental GP 5000 in a 32

panaracer gravelking in a 32


Compass bon jon pass in a 700x35

Continental also has the Gran prix 4season in a 32
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Old 11-13-18, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by el forestero View Post
Currently running Bontrager AT-750 alloy rims and 700x35c H2 Hard-Case Lite tires. Would love to hear suggestions on an upgraded set of 32 to 35 mm rims and tires for long-distance (100 to 160 km) recreational rides on roads.
I’ve had 2 sets of H2s on my commuter bike 26” versions). Great tires for their intended purpose (urban commuting), and actually fairly fast rolling for a relatively inexpensive “hybrid” tire.

But compared to a proper performance road tire, they are fairly slow, both in terms of weight and rolling resistance.

I have a set of 35mm Compass Bon Jon Pass tires that are rediculously fast and smooth. There is some pretty over-the-top hype around some of the Compass offerings, and in my experience it is pretty well deserved. However, they are very expensive, and if you are prone to flats or tire damage, might not be a good choice. That said, I have yet to get a flat on the Bon Jons or the Barlow Pass (the 38mm version), despite riding on a lot of dirt and gravel. Also, people report having mixed results running these tubeless.

From reading a lot of reviews, the Panaracer Gravel King slick seems like a good choice for a lot less money. It comes in 32c and 38c. I may get a set of them next becuase they apparently set up for tubeless very easily.

Other suggestions in this thread are probably good as well.

I would not bother with new rims, as that means a new wheelset. I think the change in tires will make a noticable difference on its own.
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Old 11-13-18, 10:28 AM
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Compass. Spend the money. Ride happy.
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Old 11-13-18, 10:50 AM
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May I suggest the Continental GrandSport Race and GrandSport Extra tires in 700x32 These are what I've been using on my hybrids lately. These are actual "road" tires with some flat protection. I've seen several 700x28 ties that fit the bill, but few in 700x32.

Last Fall I was searching for some actual 700x32 tires that were road tires that didn't have the words marathon, touring, city, plumpish, heavy as ****, associated with them and that also met the following requirements ...
  • Foldable (all sizes)
  • Pure Grip compound (1 step down from Conti's premium Black Chili compound)
  • Decent 3/180 TPI so not entry level
  • 1 layer NyTech breaker for flat protection
  • 370 grams in 700x32 size
  • Pressure: 60-102 PSI
  • Reasonably priced (under $25 each)

I really loved the way they felt between the bike and the pavement so I ended up buying some GrandSport Extras in 700x32. Differences are ...
  • Not foldable in 700x32 size (all other sizes, yes)
  • 2 layers NyTech breaker flat protection
  • 530 grams in 700x32 size (a bit plumpish)
The places where I've seen these at the lowest prices have been ProBikeKit and Chain Reaction Cycles.

Hope this helps.

Race:
https://www.continental-tires.com/bi...and-sport-race

Extra:
https://www.continental-tires.com/bi...nd-sport-extra
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Old 11-13-18, 10:52 AM
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https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TYVIVO...r-folding-tyre

Vittoria Voyager Hyper. Low rolling resistance- actually tested by machines and users.

2 of these cost $77 shipped to the US right now. There are times when a pair only costs $53 total shipped to the US.
They are fast rolling, reliable, and not expensive.

There are tons of tires available to you- compass is a nice brand but super expensive. there are absolutely other tires available that will be just as nice for less.
Panaracer gravel king in 32 is another thats relatively light, fast rolling and OK on price.

Last edited by mstateglfr; 11-13-18 at 03:08 PM.
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Old 11-13-18, 01:14 PM
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Originally Posted by seamuis View Post
Are you prioritising speed over puncture protection for a change of tires?
...
But it’s going to be hard to offer recommendations with so little info to work with. Things like your weight, the type of roads will be riding on, is there a higher chance of punctures from debris or things like thorns? Could you be prone to pinch flats if you move down to a smaller tire? (Related to your weight) budget, willing to spend? Can you fit a tire larger than 35mm?
A balance of speed and moderate puncture protection sounds good to me, rather than selecting tires exclusively on the basis of speed. On the roads I ride, the frequency of encountering man-made and natural debris is probably average. The roads are paved fairly smooth but have cracks and bumps from time to time.

I weigh about 175 lb.

I was thinking 32 to 35 mm tires would be best, given that I'm a recreational long-distance rider looking for a balance between speed and comfort, but smaller or larger tires would be ok too, if they offer some advantages. My bike is a 2016 Trek FX 7.2. It looks to have plenty of clearance for much wider tires than the 35 mm ones it came with.

As for budget, I could consider options up to $100 for a pair of tires. But that doesn't mean I feel a need to have $100 tires. A high-quality pair of tires that costs half that much would also suit me fine.

Last edited by el forestero; 11-13-18 at 01:15 PM. Reason: grammar
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Old 11-13-18, 01:19 PM
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Continental 4-seasons come in a 32. I've found them to be an excellent balance between puncture protection and speed, but they are a little on the pricey end as well.
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Old 11-13-18, 01:29 PM
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If you lived in the States and had a Performance Bike in your town, I'd suggest these for some inexpensive discontinued Continental tires.

https://www.performancebike.com/shop...ontact-50-8572

They are 700x32. I paid $9 each after sales tax in Indianapolis and had them shipped to the store for pickup to save shipping costs. The reviews I've read are mixed, but at that price I'm willing to give it a shot.
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Old 11-13-18, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by el forestero View Post
A balance of speed and moderate puncture protection sounds good to me, rather than selecting tires exclusively on the basis of speed. On the roads I ride, the frequency of encountering man-made and natural debris is probably average. The roads are paved fairly smooth but have cracks and bumps from time to time.

I weigh about 175 lb.

I was thinking 32 to 35 mm tires would be best, given that I'm a recreational long-distance rider looking for a balance between speed and comfort, but smaller or larger tires would be ok too, if they offer some advantages. My bike is a 2016 Trek FX 7.2. It looks to have plenty of clearance for much wider tires than the 35 mm ones it came with.

As for budget, I could consider options up to $100 for a pair of tires. But that doesn't mean I feel a need to have $100 tires. A high-quality pair of tires that costs half that much would also suit me fine.
if you’re looking for a good balance, and you don’t beleive the roads present any more danger of punctures than normal, and you believe you can fit larger than 35, then I would actually recommend the panaracer gravelking 38mm. A plusher ride than your current 35’s, half the weight (at about 320g per tire) and much faster, with puncture protection. This tire would make a massive difference in the way your bike feels and handles, while giving even more comfort than your current tires. These can be typically be purchased online for about $45 USD per tire. If you don’t want to go 38mm or would like to keep some room for fenders, I would strongly recommend the 32mm version. This can be found online for the same price. I genuinely believe, given your stated weight, your more general needs/desires, that the gravelkings would be an excellent choice. As you can see from the other comments they already have multiple recommendations. I commute on the 32’s everyday. Both the 32 and 38mm are ‘tubless’ compatible as well, if that’s also a consideration. You could also get the ‘sk’ version with side knobs for proper gravel/off-road use, but I think the ‘slick’ version would be the best choice.

there are still a plethora of choices in this range though, from schwalbe, continental, vittoria, soma, etc, etc.

Some me people have mentioned Compass tires, but if you would like to stay within $100 or less, I wouldn’t recommend them. These tires are very ‘plush’ tires, but they prioritise lightness and softness over everything else. They’re great tires but they don’t really offer puncture protection, they’ll wear quickly and you’ll cough up quite a few pennies. The gravelkings will give you a good %80 of that for a lot less. compass tires are made by panaracer anyway.

A few other good choices would be the Soma Shikoro. It can be had in 33 and 38mm. Has a little more puncture protection than the gravelkings, but similar weight (both lighter than your current tires). Good grip and fast rolling. I can personally vouch for the tires as I can the gravelkings. These are also made by panaracer and are tubeless compatible. These are generally more expensive, but you can find them online typically for the same price as the gravelkings.
Fairweather also has a few choices that would be good: the ‘Cruise’ 38mm and the ‘Traveler’ 32mm. Similar weight to both the gravelkings and shikoro, and they also come in a selection of colours, if that’s your thing. These can be had for around $35 per tire. The Fairwether tires are also made by panaracer. The ‘traveler’ is a copy of the Gravelking, and the ‘cruise’ is a copy of the panaracer Pasela. These are the lightest options, because they have the least puncture protection.

the main reason for my recommendations, is because these tires strike a good balance, but offer massively improved performance without sacrifice of comfort. If you’re asking about upgrading both tires and wheels, I think it would be smarter and more economical to spend the money on lighter tires. It will cost you less in total upgrades, and greatly improve the weight, handling and overall enjoyment of the bike. This would negate the need for a wheel upgrade, that staying with a cheaper, heavier tire might push you to continue wanting. There are plenty of cheap options out there, in 32-38mm range, but most wont be much if any better than what you have.

If if you are in Japan, I believe you can get panaracer, soma and fairweather tires pretty easily and cheaply. BlueLug in either Hatagaya or Kamiuma should be able to help you out.

Last edited by seamuis; 11-13-18 at 02:40 PM.
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Old 11-13-18, 02:32 PM
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Can't really beat these for the price:
https://www.thebikesmiths.com/produc...dition-10332-2

But only if you run them tubeless.
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Old 11-13-18, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by seamuis View Post
Some me people have mentioned Compass tires,
These tires are very ‘plush’ tires, but they prioritise lightness and softness over everything else. They’re great tires but they don’t really offer puncture protection, they’ll wear quickly and you’ll cough up quite a few pennies. The gravelkings will give you a good %80 of that for a lot less. compass tires are made by panaracer anyway.
Actually, the tread rubber of Compass tires is unusually thick for such a pricey performance-oriented tire; they're about 3mm at the centerline, despite a very thin casing and no puncture-protection layer. Consequentially, they're very long-wearing compared with Gravelkings, which achieve their extremely light weight (in some sizes lighter than Compass) by using incredibly thin tread rubber.
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Old 11-13-18, 02:47 PM
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What, no love for the Challenge Strada Bianca? Run some 33s (measure out to 35 or so on my wide rims) that I use when I take my gravel bike on fast group road rides. Very smooth and fast.
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Old 11-13-18, 10:07 PM
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Well if you got 90 bucks a tire money the new gp 5000 boobookittyplucks come in 32 , or 28 on a wide rim will be about 32 .

Gp4ks2 in 28
Swalbe pro 1 in 28 will measure wide .
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Old 11-14-18, 02:19 AM
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Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Actually, the tread rubber of Compass tires is unusually thick for such a pricey performance-oriented tire; they're about 3mm at the centerline, despite a very thin casing and no puncture-protection layer. Consequentially, they're very long-wearing compared with Gravelkings, which achieve their extremely light weight (in some sizes lighter than Compass) by using incredibly thin tread rubber.
ive only ever used the EL, so maybe that changed my experience. However, the ZSG compound on the gravelkings is just as long wearing as any middle range ‘performance’ tires and I’m not sure the OP does enough miles to warrant that 3mm thick treading. None of this changes the fact that I believe the compass to not be a good choice for the OP. That’s too much of an extreme change and probably not worth the cost, when the heavy frame won’t benefit much. This is actually why I strongly recommend the gravelkings. As I said, you get a good %80 of what the compass tires offer for less, including some puncture protection. Besides that, a 38mm gravelking weighs less than a 35mm compass bon jon pass. (355g to 320g). That’s really hard to beat, for the price, and a good upgrade over his current tires.

Last edited by seamuis; 11-14-18 at 02:27 AM.
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Old 11-14-18, 02:25 AM
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Originally Posted by ksryder View Post
What, no love for the Challenge Strada Bianca? Run some 33s (measure out to 35 or so on my wide rims) that I use when I take my gravel bike on fast group road rides. Very smooth and fast.
no. None. They’re good performing tires, but they are an absolute PITA, to mount. Also, I don’t think tires like that are a good choice for the OP. His frame is pretty heavy, he’s not doing any performance specific riding, and he’s coming from hybrid tires similar to a schwalbe marathon or delta cruiser. He doesn’t need racing tires, he needs good middle range performing tires that improve the handling, grip and sheds excess rotational weight. Taking the OPs information and stated use, the gravelkings fit the bill perfectly.
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Old 11-14-18, 04:14 AM
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Originally Posted by seamuis View Post


no. None. They’re good performing tires, but they are an absolute PITA, to mount. Also, I don’t think tires like that are a good choice for the OP. His frame is pretty heavy, he’s not doing any performance specific riding, and he’s coming from hybrid tires similar to a schwalbe marathon or delta cruiser. He doesn’t need racing tires, he needs good middle range performing tires that improve the handling, grip and sheds excess rotational weight. Taking the OPs information and stated use, the gravelkings fit the bill perfectly.
agree,

I how ever ran 28c Michelin dynamics (measured 30) on a hybrid forever and it was fine. If the OP is always on pavement the 700x38 might be over kill, but super plush. which is why I suggested the 32.

feedback on the 700x38 gravelkings
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Old 11-14-18, 04:58 AM
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I have a pair of Bontrager R2 700X32 with less than 50 miles on them I'm trying to sell if anyone is interested.
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Old 11-14-18, 08:57 AM
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I had another look at my bike and realized I forgot to check tire clearance at one of the narrowest points. Turns out 38 mm would be a tight squeeze, if they'd fit at all.

Ordered a pair of the slick panaracer gravel king 32 tires for the equivalent of US$42 each. Looking forward to taking them out on the road.

Thanks for the helpful advice, everybody!
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Old 11-14-18, 09:14 AM
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Nice! I ended up putting slick gravel king's on my winter fixie, but was only able to fit 26's since they ran a little big. If 38 mm is iffy, though, it seems like there would be enough wiggle room between 32s so that even if they were a little large, they'd still fit.

I've been a fan of them so far, they're supple and grip well in the rain, which is the main thing I wanted out of a winter tire for my commute.
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Old 11-14-18, 09:30 AM
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Originally Posted by seamuis View Post


no. None. They’re good performing tires, but they are an absolute PITA, to mount. Also, I don’t think tires like that are a good choice for the OP. His frame is pretty heavy, he’s not doing any performance specific riding, and he’s coming from hybrid tires similar to a schwalbe marathon or delta cruiser. He doesn’t need racing tires, he needs good middle range performing tires that improve the handling, grip and sheds excess rotational weight. Taking the OPs information and stated use, the gravelkings fit the bill perfectly.
Hmm what rims are you using? I can mount/dismount mine on DTSwiss R460 rims without using levers, and I was mildly concerned that they were actually too loose when I first got them.

I'll admit I haven't thrashed mine on non-paved surfaces, that's what my Trigger Pros are for, but I haven't had any complaints so far. YMMV.
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Old 11-14-18, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Metieval View Post
agree,

I how ever ran 28c Michelin dynamics (measured 30) on a hybrid forever and it was fine. If the OP is always on pavement the 700x38 might be over kill, but super plush. which is why I suggested the 32.

feedback on the 700x38 gravelkings
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VZIvxkKkHw
i agree with you about the 38, but I only mentioned that after he stated he believed he had room for larger than 35mm. So it was a “why not” sort of suggestion. My first suggestion was the 32s, especially if he would like to run fenders at some point. Either one, I think would be a really good choice. More importantly, they make sense.
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Old 11-14-18, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by ksryder View Post
Hmm what rims are you using? I can mount/dismount mine on DTSwiss R460 rims without using levers, and I was mildly concerned that they were actually too loose when I first got them.

I'll admit I haven't thrashed mine on non-paved surfaces, that's what my Trigger Pros are for, but I haven't had any complaints so far. YMMV.
h+Son tb14. But I’m far from the only person to have issues mounting stranda biancas. I would say, if yours mounted easy, you’re in the minority. Excellent tires though, no doubt. These are the only tires to ever break leavers trying to mount, that I’ve experienced.
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