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Stock tyre or knobbly

Old 11-19-18, 07:13 AM
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Cheeky DeVille
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Stock tyre or knobbly

Hello,
I will be picking up a Trek FX2 Disc in a few days. I have the option of having a change in tyres at no cost. I thought to go with knobbly instead of the stock tyres.
https://www.trekbikes.com/gb/en_GB/b...​​
The reason is glass on the roads in India and hoping that there will be less punctures to deal with, even though the knobbly tyres will be in bit slower... I'm not going to try and catch the wind, so... Should I or shouldn't I change tyres?
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Old 11-19-18, 07:33 AM
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Look around and see what the locals use. Copy them. They know things about where you live that I don't.
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Old 11-19-18, 08:52 AM
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Knobby tires are not necessarily any more puncture resistant than the stock tires that come with the bike
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Old 11-19-18, 11:20 AM
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Its the added barriers in the casing, that help.

When my Local sells a bike and the buyer wants a different tire ,

they change the tires, and bill the cost difference.. @ point of sale..*

the puncture resistant features add weight to the tire and cost..

*now you have a used tire.. so may not get a trade in..
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Old 11-19-18, 01:31 PM
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Knobby tires are noticeably slower, grip less well, and noisier when riding.

If you want glass-resistent tires I'd get Schwalbe Marathon Plus's:
https://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_t...hon_Plus_HS440

There's video's like this one (at 0:50) where he puts thumb tacks into the tire and rides it around fine:

That would be a better way to go vs knobbies for flat protection. I've definitely gotten flats with knobbies.

Like RetroGrouch said, good idea to look around and see what the locals are riding.
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Old 11-19-18, 04:33 PM
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I have been using inexpensive street tires with Mr. Tuffy Tire Liners for years. I've ride dirt and gravel trails onsmooth 700x28 and 700x35s.

Here are the 700x35s on 20 miles of dirt and gravel. with no flats. and decent traction.
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Old 11-19-18, 08:00 PM
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Thanx guys for taking the time to respond! Vids were good.
I will stay with the stock tyres and look at Schwalbe when I need a change.
Again, thanx much.
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Old 11-19-18, 08:32 PM
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Since you are talking about a Trek dealer(I work at one) I would reccomend the slicker tire but with the "Hard-case or hard-case-lite" options included. They kevlar weave the tire and make the soles a little thicker. I switched my commuter over to the Bontrager H-5 a couple months ago when my previous tires got a rather large nail and the road was getting glassier in the city. Haven't had a problem since and that includes running through said glass with the same level of inner tubes installed and no extra sealant or strips. Grip is pretty good too since at a couple points I like to dive up to 38 mph
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Old 11-20-18, 01:45 AM
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Originally Posted by mtbikerinpa View Post
Since you are talking about a Trek dealer(I work at one) I would reccomend the slicker tire but with the "Hard-case or hard-case-lite" options included. They kevlar weave the tire and make the soles a little thicker. I switched my commuter over to the Bontrager H-5 a couple months ago when my previous tires got a rather large nail and the road was getting glassier in the city. Haven't had a problem since and that includes running through said glass with the same level of inner tubes installed and no extra sealant or strips. Grip is pretty good too since at a couple points I like to dive up to 38 mph
THAT i will try to do! If I can't afford it immediately, then definitely later.
Thanx again.
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Old 11-20-18, 05:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Cheeky DeVille View Post
.... If I can't afford it immediately, then definitely later.
Thanx again.

is your bike just for toodling around town or commuting locally?


if not worried about speed or weight, you can DIY it.



i used to live in mesquite/goathead-land. would slit an old inner tube and wrap it around the new one, then take a smaller width used tire, cut the bead off, and use that as a tire liner. heavy but it worked.
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Old 11-20-18, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by saddlesores View Post
is your bike just for toodling around town or commuting locally?


if not worried about speed or weight, you can DIY it.



i used to live in mesquite/goathead-land. would slit an old inner tube and wrap it around the new one, then take a smaller width used tire, cut the bead off, and use that as a tire liner. heavy but it worked.
wow that's a super idea . Would eventually like to tour... that is one handy DIY!
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Old 11-20-18, 11:15 PM
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Thorn Resistant tubes are a common choice here, molded super thick on the outer side ,
less thick than the inner side..
they work very well .. But you may feel the rolling resistance greater, when you let the psi drop.

so on my my long tours I kept them topped up frequently....
at home they make the bike reliable , they don't easily flat, so I just get on and ride..
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Old 11-22-18, 08:38 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Thorn Resistant tubes are a common choice here, molded super thick on the outer side ,
less thick than the inner side..
they work very well .. But you may feel the rolling resistance greater, when you let the psi drop.

so on my my long tours I kept them topped up frequently....
at home they make the bike reliable , they don't easily flat, so I just get on and ride..
Ah interesting! Thorn resistant... who would have thunk!

Going to assemble my Trek FX2 Disc at the store this morning and finances dictate a simple exchange at no extra charge for the LT2 from the H2. Thanks guys!
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Old 11-26-18, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
Knobby tires are noticeably slower, grip less well, and noisier when riding.

If you want glass-resistent tires I'd get Schwalbe Marathon Plus's:
https://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_t...hon_Plus_HS440

There's video's like this one (at 0:50) where he puts thumb tacks into the tire and rides it around fine:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqQpyQtLIrk

That would be a better way to go vs knobbies for flat protection. I've definitely gotten flats with knobbies.

Like RetroGrouch said, good idea to look around and see what the locals are riding.
+1 And a Kevlar anti-puncture layer is always good if you ride in nasty areas/surfaces.

Definitely do not recommend knobbies as a way to resist punctures. They have more carcass exposed to direct puncture between the knobs. I'd go for a tire with a good thick general purpose tread.

As the others have said, the locals will know ... Also, glass cuts may not be repairable ... So it may mean new tires more often. In that case cost is a big factor too ...
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