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Why don't most factory hybrid bikes have.....

Old 12-13-18, 05:39 AM
  #101  
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Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
Comfort on bike seat has to do with proper support of the sit bones. Not a bunch of thick padding. Not a seat with springs.
Well, since there is no such body part as "the sit bones" and saddles don't actually directly contact any bones unless you're a skeleton, I don't tend to give that oft-repeated assertion a lot of credit.
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Old 12-13-18, 06:38 AM
  #102  
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ischium
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Old 12-13-18, 08:50 AM
  #103  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
Well, since there is no such body part as "the sit bones" and saddles don't actually directly contact any bones unless you're a skeleton, I don't tend to give that oft-repeated assertion a lot of credit.
I guess you aren't educated on the subject enough to speak intelligently about it.

https://bikefitadviser.com/sit-bones-and-saddle-width/

https://www.sq-lab.com/en/sqlab-ergo...ct-saddle.html
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Old 12-13-18, 09:12 AM
  #104  
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Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
I guess you aren't educated on the subject enough to speak intelligently about it.

https://bikefitadviser.com/sit-bones-and-saddle-width/

https://www.sq-lab.com/en/sqlab-ergo...ct-saddle.html

Did you actually read your own links? Yes, they do use the informal term "Sit bones", but neither of them assert that support of the bones is the only factor, and one explicitly denies it.

From the bikefitadvser link:
  • sit bone width, torso angle, dynamic motion of pelvis, and surrounding soft tissue all play a role
They both note that width of the saddle will vary with the position of the rider. Unless they've managed to somehow test all sizes and shapes of butts ("soft tissue") with all possible postures, I'm not sure how you can absolutely generalize about whether springiness is really going to cause problems for everyone.

Like I said, I tend to believe people when they say they're comfortable more than I believe "experts" claiming that they must be wrong about their own comfort.
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Old 12-13-18, 09:41 AM
  #105  
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OP's dream bike...

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Old 12-13-18, 10:23 AM
  #106  
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Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
Comfort on bike seat has to do with proper support of the sit bones. Not a bunch of thick padding. Not a seat with springs.
Brooks seems to think the springs help...
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Old 12-13-18, 10:54 AM
  #107  
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Originally Posted by prj71 View Post
OP's dream bike...

in fairness, that’s actually pretty badass. Way cooler than the OPs desired bike.
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Old 12-13-18, 11:17 AM
  #108  
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Originally Posted by Doug5150 View Post
Brooks seems to think the springs help...
that’s because Brooks saddles aren’t comfortable for everyone, but they want to sell to those people too
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Old 12-13-18, 11:39 AM
  #109  
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Giant Cypress. Very comfy cruiser.
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Old 12-13-18, 11:41 AM
  #110  
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Originally Posted by Doug5150 View Post
Brooks seems to think the springs help...
wether the springs are “helpful” actually has a lot to do with the frame as well as the person sittting in them. (Not getting into the debate about what is perceived comfort vs what’s actually good for you medically speaking) But the springs in brooks saddles actually have a weight limit, and if you’re, by your own words ‘obese’, you’ll probably bottom them out, making them useless. I’ve always hated them, mainly because they always squeak and it’s damn near impossible to make that completely go away. I wouldn’t be surprised if most people, even back in the 1890s found them uncomfortable and annoying.
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Old 12-13-18, 01:10 PM
  #111  
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Alot of sprung saddle designs emerged form the early bike industry when most people say upright, which sent road shock directly up the spine. The spine does fine while standing or walking because all the muscles from the feet to the hips absorb im pacts. Stick that same sopine directly on the impact source (saddle) and it beats the lower back muscles. hence, saddles which absorbed shock.

If the OP rides upright (which is his stated wont) then a sprung saddle, as long as it is sufficiently strong ( please see@seamuis's post #110 ) would be fine. As for the size of the saddle, if he is sitting on it, not straddling it, the width is irrelevant. As for all the padding, he might find that a too-soft saddle leads to lots fo sliding around, but if, as seems to be the case, he does only short rides at low intensity, a tractor-type saddle should be fine.

Simple concept---different tools are best suited for different jobs. For a cyclist putting most of his weight on his buttocks, sitting bolt upright, a wide, sprung saddle makes sense.

My issue with the OP was his ridiculous, whiny, self-pitying, self-important, entitled, selfish attitude, not he way he rides a bike or the type of bike he likes to ride. Anyone who walks around complaining that the whole world isn't custom-constructed to meet his or her fleeting whims is .... exactly that. No less could be said.

But as for wide, sprung seats ... not an issue.
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Old 12-13-18, 01:18 PM
  #112  
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Originally Posted by seamuis View Post
But the springs in brooks saddles actually have a weight limit, and if you’re, by your own words ‘obese’, you’ll probably bottom them out, making them useless.
Where did you get this information about bottoming out Brooks Saddles?

From the Brooks FAQ:
"What is the maximum rider weight for a Brooks saddle?
There are no definitive (or published) weight limits for a Brooks Saddles; There are other factors to be considered, such as the riding style of the user, the type of terrain frequented etc. Brooks do offer three heavy duty models; B33, B135 and B190. These are recommended for riders who weight in excess of 20 stones (280 pounds, or 127 kilograms)."
https://www.brooksengland.com/en_us/faq

FWIW the OP previously posted that he weighed 255 pounds.
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Old 12-13-18, 01:36 PM
  #113  
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Originally Posted by seamuis View Post

in fairness, that’s actually pretty badass. Way cooler than the OPs desired bike.
Fo' shizzle!
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Old 12-13-18, 01:53 PM
  #114  
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Where did you get this information about bottoming out Brooks Saddles?

From the Brooks FAQ:
"What is the maximum rider weight for a Brooks saddle?
There are no definitive (or published) weight limits for a Brooks Saddles; There are other factors to be considered, such as the riding style of the user, the type of terrain frequented etc. Brooks do offer three heavy duty models; B33, B135 and B190. These are recommended for riders who weight in excess of 20 stones (280 pounds, or 127 kilograms)."
https://www.brooksengland.com/en_us/faq

FWIW the OP previously posted that he weighed 255 pounds.
i was told by a brooks employee at a factory tour some years back, when I specifically asked about them. For clarity he wasn’t talking about a specific model, nor did I ask about one. It was a general question and the worker said that if you’re heavy enough they can bottom out. Also, you specifically listed the heavy duty models, but conveniently didn’t mention models like the flyer, b66,b67, conquest. Which don’t have the triple rail double-coiled springs. Two very different designs with different weight limits. Also, I didn’t suggest the OP would bottom any brooks saddle out, it was a general statement. If you’re going to counter my statement, great, but at least be fair and balanced. Don’t try to slyly accuse me of false info, while purposely being selective in your counter.
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Old 12-13-18, 05:18 PM
  #115  
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Originally Posted by seamuis View Post


i was told by a brooks employee at a factory tour some years back, when I specifically asked about them. For clarity he wasn’t talking about a specific model, nor did I ask about one. It was a general question and the worker said that if you’re heavy enough they can bottom out. Also, you specifically listed the heavy duty models, but conveniently didn’t mention models like the flyer, b66,b67, conquest. Which don’t have the triple rail double-coiled springs. Two very different designs with different weight limits. Also, I didn’t suggest the OP would bottom any brooks saddle out, it was a general statement. If you’re going to counter my statement, great, but at least be fair and balanced. Don’t try to slyly accuse me of false info, while purposely being selective in your counter.
Read the Brooks answer again. "There are no definitive (or published) weight limits for a Brooks Saddles" With NO qualifier about which models have no weight limits. The quoted Brooks response (I didn't list them) did recommend the heavier duty saddles cyclists to cyclists over 280 pounds but nothing about bottoming out any Brooks saddle and nothing about any saddle model not being capable of bearing the weight of an obese cyclist. Note again that the OP weighs 255 pounds.

I have used B-66 Saddles since 1976 and at one time weighed 235 pounds and hardly depressed the springs, still have and use that saddle though now weigh 187 pounds.








Also note that neither my B66, B72 or B73 saddles make any kind of squeaking noise.
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Old 12-14-18, 08:56 AM
  #116  
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Read the Brooks answer again. "There are no definitive (or published) weight limits for a Brooks Saddles" With NO qualifier about which models have no weight limits. The quoted Brooks response (I didn't list them) did recommend the heavier duty saddles cyclists to cyclists over 280 pounds but nothing about bottoming out any Brooks saddle and nothing about any saddle model not being capable of bearing the weight of an obese cyclist.
this doesn’t bolster your argument. All this says is that Brooks doesn’t have any specific published limits. So unless you’re going to argue that they theoretically have no limit, your position literally makes no sense. I did a factory tour in 2013, i was told that if you’re heavy enough you can bottom them out. The heavy duty models are specifically for heavier weight. According to brooks if you weigh over 280, you should use the heavy duty model. Common sense thusly tells you that the single rail, single coil spring saddles can handle up to the range of 280. That means the OP is approaching the limit of the standard sprung saddles. Or to put it more simply, someone of his weight could potentially bottom out certain saddles. This also means cheaper spring saddles with weaker springs will also likely bottom out. This is in line with what I was literally told by a brooks saddle maker. So what exactly are you arguing here? Because your own posted info supports my position.

also, I don’t care what the OP weighs, I was simply pointing out that sprung saddles can bottom out. So unless youre saying that’s impossible, then we are in agreement, and your position makes no sense, because you’re literally arguing on the single notion of “brooks doesn’t have any published numbers.” as if that actually proves my initial statement untrue, when it doesn’t.

I have used B-66 Saddles since 1976 and at one time weighed 235 pounds and hardly depressed the springs, still have and use that saddle though now weigh 187 pounds.
this proves literally nothing and again, doesn’t bolster your position.

Also note that neither my B66, B72 or B73 saddles make any kind of squeaking noise.
noted. But your experience isn’t gospel. I’ve owned more than one brooks sprung saddle. A B33 on a pashley roadster sovereign and a B67 purchased for a custom 70s Raleigh tourist. Both suffered from a fair bit of squeak. Cheers, mate.

Last edited by seamuis; 12-14-18 at 09:02 AM.
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Old 12-14-18, 09:50 AM
  #117  
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Originally Posted by seamuis View Post
So unless you’re going to argue that they theoretically have no limit, your position literally makes no sense.
Fine, somebody once told you that "obese" people are likely to "bottom out" the springs on a Brooks saddle; ever see it happen in real life? I suppose if you find someone heavy enough (maybe 500+ pounds) to bust up normal furniture with his bulk he might break bicycle saddles too. I haven't seen many (actually any) such immense people riding bicycles. I suppose your tip on this subject might be pertinent to them wherever they are.
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Old 12-15-18, 03:23 PM
  #118  
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Fine, somebody once told you that "obese" people are likely to "bottom out" the springs on a Brooks saddle; ever see it happen in real life? I suppose if you find someone heavy enough (maybe 500+ pounds) to bust up normal furniture with his bulk he might break bicycle saddles too. I haven't seen many (actually any) such immense people riding bicycles. I suppose your tip on this subject might be pertinent to them wherever they are.
Lightfoot cycles used to make recumbents, and they had a trike for people that big. They closed in 2015 however.

I am kinda hesitant to get into these conversations much, since the originators generally aren't willing to change anything. I get it occasionally in real life too, since I only own a recumbent and a crank-forward bike now and people stop and ask questions about them.

A lot of people buy cheap bicycles and don't ride them because it hurts too much,,, so they say that they want a normal bicycle that is comfortable, but they also want it to be not expensive. Or, they want some inexpensive part they can put on the bicycle they already have, to make it more comfortable. And there isn't anything like that.
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Old 12-17-18, 12:28 PM
  #119  
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I'm not sure why anyone responds to this OP's threads.

Ooops, guess I just responded.
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Old 12-17-18, 01:51 PM
  #120  
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the road to bankruptcy is paved with bad marketing ideas

Originally Posted by JonBailey View Post
1. big, comfy spring seats?
2. nice, tall ape-hanger cruising bars?

Bicycle manufacturers should take styling cues from Harley-Davidson cruisers.
Bike makers are not into going bankrupt intentionally.

A bike like that is hard to ride since you have to PEDAL rather than just twist a throttle.

I know from experience. I had a 26" bike with a very cushy spring seat and ape hangers
when I was in Jr. HIgh School. I loved it dearly and could make it go pretty d**n fast.

But it would be hard to "ride" for a middle aged person.

Too much energy loss trying to make the wheels turn and it would create upper back muscle pains.
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Old 12-17-18, 02:23 PM
  #121  
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because then it would be a beach cruiser.
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Old 12-17-18, 02:43 PM
  #122  
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Originally Posted by slowrevs View Post
Bike makers are not into going bankrupt intentionally.

A bike like that is hard to ride since you have to PEDAL rather than just twist a throttle.

I know from experience. I had a 26" bike with a very cushy spring seat and ape hangers
when I was in Jr. HIgh School. I loved it dearly and could make it go pretty d**n fast.

But it would be hard to "ride" for a middle aged person.

Too much energy loss trying to make the wheels turn and it would create upper back muscle pains.
Could you hit a front porch with a newspaper while riding it pretty damn fast?
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Old 12-17-18, 04:07 PM
  #123  
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Originally Posted by dueWest View Post
Why not Banana Seats? They are stylish. Oh, and here's my old Muscle/BMX hybrid from long ago in new skins. 1972 Murray Eliminator frame - Western Flyer. Just finished up the redo for my nephew.
I had one of these growing up!!
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Old 12-17-18, 06:55 PM
  #124  
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You can install a more comfortable seat

After I had to quit my job because of wage theft and a hostile work environment I could not afford to replace a car that went to hell. So I took up using a bike to get groceries. The bike I purchased appears to be a mountain bike: it has large tires, a suspension system consisting of springs and hydraulic shock absorbers and a beautifully engineered disc brake in front. The design is almost lyrical. While not that necessary a disc brake would be nice in the real wheel if it did not get in the way of the sprockets. I am in my early 70's but I train hard with weights and after a few months riding went from difficult for my endurance to effortless.
It may not be in the style of others, but it is right for my tastes and preferences.
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Old 12-17-18, 08:30 PM
  #125  
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Originally Posted by JonBailey View Post
1. big, comfy spring seats?
2. nice, tall ape-hanger cruising bars?

Bicycle manufacturers should take styling cues from Harley-Davidson cruisers.

The way most mountain bikes are configured hurts my body badly especially with my rheumatoid arthritis.
I am middle-aged too.
A middle ager in a senior body!
Riders of hybrid bikes are not new to riding distances. A hybrid bike is an iteration of a road bike or exactly an old touring bike. Plus you have issues in the butt area and arthritis. You must tailor a hybrid bike for your maladies instead of punching yourself in the head saying, why dont they make bikes for normal senior people?

Guess what? Youre winning. You can tell the shop what you want and they will accommodate, for a price. Make a list on your smart phone.

Hang the maladies. Have fun. Consider a throttle. Throttles help starting from a stop and when tired but watch the battery indicator. Be sure you can sit flat footed.

Normal people sit toe footed. Short people sit right bun on left side of seat, left foot flat footed, right foot on pedal, bike canted left side. You cant handle a tall bike. Shorter the bike the better.

To tailor a good fitting bike takes hope that each change will work in the long run. But keep the original seat in case you want to change. A cruiser seat adds weight and bulk.

Become a bike fixit guy to save shop costs. There are Youtube and bike books in the libraries. You can search the libraries online and reserve books in use at other libraries.

Have fun with your new ebike. Dont be so into yourself. Be into bikes and biking. Smile a lot.
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