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Never been to a gym

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Old 01-02-19, 03:51 PM
  #101  
livedarklions
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Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
I think you and others touch on something that I see in my work with the elderly. Almost all older people of the war/post war generation did not go to a gym or even perform athletics but those that "age" well physically seem to have had active lives in the form of moderate workload like farming and/or lots of walking. The worst are those that worked and then do nothing upon retirement, having earned a long desired rest. The mind that accepts regular exertion as normal seems to be more fit long term. I would say fitness is far easier to achieve (and more beneficial long term) if it is the result of overall active lifestyles rather than sedentary lives interposed with activity on a gym.

I'm fairy lucky ATM to be able to bike commute once again to work (after a few years of car commuting 2 hours each day) and walk a lot as part of my job. This helps a great deal as far as basic training goes so that I can jump into activities at a more advanced level rather than having to work up from an entry level of fitness. The more I can jump into activities, the more activities I do. It's a self fulfilling cycle of fitness that is a pleasure to experience once it happens. The world of physical experiences opens up because I am basically capable of doing them moderately. From there I choose which I really enjoy and work further on.

My job necessitates many sedentary hours. Making the effort to go to the gym was key to breaking the habit of continuing on into a sedentary evening and weekend. In essence, those initially short visits served as a sort of "gateway drug" to a habit of doing a fairly rigorous workout routine throughout the week. I really have a much lower tolerance for sitting around doing nothing as a result.
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Old 01-02-19, 04:41 PM
  #102  
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Ok

Nothing wrong with only cycling to stay fit. Its definitely not a bad idea to mix it up even if its just how hard you ride from time to time.
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Old 01-02-19, 06:32 PM
  #103  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
My job necessitates many sedentary hours. Making the effort to go to the gym was key to breaking the habit of continuing on into a sedentary evening and weekend. In essence, those initially short visits served as a sort of "gateway drug" to a habit of doing a fairly rigorous workout routine throughout the week. I really have a much lower tolerance for sitting around doing nothing as a result.
Absolutely.

In some ways our generations have it far better than previous because there is no stigma or negative attached to fitness as a goal unto itself. In the past many men would think they had to stop childish "games" and get down to the serious adult business of working hard. Often at one set of tasks, they did this until they retired when they felt they could sit around guilt free, having earned a rest. Any relaxation or change during the work cycle was usually drinking at the pub/bar. Thus, death in their late 60's or early 70's.

Japanese businessmen still tend to do this and they even have a term for dying at your job called Karoshi.

Today, recreational sports or pastimes are normalized, as is working out in a gym, and even specifically encouraged for adults. The fastest growing segment for travel and adventure leisure currently are zoomers, or older adults and most larger businesses have some form of health and wellness committees.

IMO - Having a sedentary job and recognizing the need for additional physical effort via the gym or physical pastimes is a recent but extremely positive development in human health. We are also getting a lot smarter about being healthy too but have a somewhat sad consumerist approach to it. For something to be good or effective it seems it has to cost more, whether that be food, exercise, equipment, adventure or travel.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 01-02-19 at 06:42 PM.
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Old 01-02-19, 07:18 PM
  #104  
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Originally Posted by Nmyer89 View Post
Nothing wrong with only cycling to stay fit. Its definitely not a bad idea to mix it up even if its just how hard you ride from time to time.
On the contrary, cycling is only one part of the equation to general fitness. You also need strength and flexibility.
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Old 01-02-19, 07:25 PM
  #105  
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Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
For something to be good or effective it seems it has to cost more, whether that be food, exercise, equipment, adventure or travel.

The truth is that it doesn't have to be expensive...Fitness doesn't require a huge investment of money into fancy equipment... nor does it require spending money on overpriced "super foods" and "miracle foods" and expensive nutritional supplement which don't even work...
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Old 01-02-19, 09:09 PM
  #106  
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Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
I think you and others touch on something that I see in my work with the elderly. Almost all older people of the war/post war generation did not go to a gym or even perform athletics but those that "age" well physically seem to have had active lives in the form of moderate workload like farming and/or lots of walking. The worst are those that worked and then do nothing upon retirement, having earned a long desired rest. The mind that accepts regular exertion as normal seems to be more fit long term. I would say fitness is far easier to achieve (and more beneficial long term) if it is the result of overall active lifestyles rather than sedentary lives interposed with activity on a gym.

I'm fairy lucky ATM to be able to bike commute once again to work (after a few years of car commuting 2 hours each day) and walk a lot as part of my job. This helps a great deal as far as basic training goes so that I can jump into activities at a more advanced level rather than having to work up from an entry level of fitness. The more I can jump into activities, the more activities I do. It's a self fulfilling cycle of fitness that is a pleasure to experience once it happens. The world of physical experiences opens up because I am basically capable of doing them moderately. From there I choose which I really enjoy and work further on.
During Rowan's recovery, his physiotherapists generally seem to work on specific tasks to increase his range of motion in his right arm, for example, and others.

Meanwhile, with or without their knowledge, I've been encouraging a more general approach from getting him up and walking back in the hospital, to the gardening, and of course cycling.

He is still within 1 year of his accident, but is probably fitter than a lot of people I see around. And the neurosurgeon he saw for his back just about fell off his chair when Rowan told him that the longest ride he had been on to that point was 27 km (he did 40 km yesterday, so we're still progressing!). The neurosurgeon said that it was extremely unusual for someone to cycle at all, let alone 27 km within the first year of a brain injury of the severity of Rowan's. But I wonder if maybe most people don't have someone encouraging them to do that ... and don't have the background and motivation to do that.

Anyway, we're probably both not as fit as we were, but we do have a reasonable sort of fitness which we can build on.
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Old 01-03-19, 02:02 AM
  #107  
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Originally Posted by Machka View Post
During Rowan's recovery, his physiotherapists generally seem to work on specific tasks to increase his range of motion in his right arm, for example, and others.

Meanwhile, with or without their knowledge, I've been encouraging a more general approach from getting him up and walking back in the hospital, to the gardening, and of course cycling.

He is still within 1 year of his accident, but is probably fitter than a lot of people I see around. And the neurosurgeon he saw for his back just about fell off his chair when Rowan told him that the longest ride he had been on to that point was 27 km (he did 40 km yesterday, so we're still progressing!). The neurosurgeon said that it was extremely unusual for someone to cycle at all, let alone 27 km within the first year of a brain injury of the severity of Rowan's. But I wonder if maybe most people don't have someone encouraging them to do that ... and don't have the background and motivation to do that.

Anyway, we're probably both not as fit as we were, but we do have a reasonable sort of fitness which we can build on.
That's good news about Rowan

Part of it is the mystery of TBI's; like strokes their recovery is highly individualized. Part of it could be your encouragement and because of his passion, an intrinsic motivation/work ethic to regain cycling. What part the Physio works on also depends. There are several theories on TBI recovery. Sometimes if they worry about it, they will focus on gross movement first, but if they expect that to return they may leapfrog to fine motor skills so the person doesn't lose too much in the interim. Some theory advocates making progress by encouraging incorrect compensatory movement while other theory rejects compensatory movement in favour of more correct movement, even if it takes longer. It's all very interesting stuff to study because the jury is still out on a lot of it. If he is making good progress then whatever is creating it is good stuff - if it works don't fix it!

Having read some of your exploits I also suspect there was more than reasonable fitness to build upon
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Old 01-03-19, 08:25 AM
  #108  
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Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
That's good news about Rowan

Part of it is the mystery of TBI's; like strokes their recovery is highly individualized. Part of it could be your encouragement and because of his passion, an intrinsic motivation/work ethic to regain cycling. What part the Physio works on also depends. There are several theories on TBI recovery. Sometimes if they worry about it, they will focus on gross movement first, but if they expect that to return they may leapfrog to fine motor skills so the person doesn't lose too much in the interim. Some theory advocates making progress by encouraging incorrect compensatory movement while other theory rejects compensatory movement in favour of more correct movement, even if it takes longer. It's all very interesting stuff to study because the jury is still out on a lot of it. If he is making good progress then whatever is creating it is good stuff - if it works don't fix it!

Having read some of your exploits I also suspect there was more than reasonable fitness to build upon

Okay, really half-baked armchair theorizing below. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.

Very broadly speaking, there are what are called perishable skills (which fade without practice) and non-perishable skills which stay with us once learned. Riding a bike is, of course, the cliche example of a non-perishable skill. This makes me think that learning to ride a bike actually causes some permanent structural differences in the brain--in other words, we get "hard-wired" to do it. My extremely limited layman knowledge of brain science is that pathways that are used a lot actually get strengthened over time--these are actual, physically observable structural changes.

Rowan's wonderfully exceptional physical recovery has really got me wondering--are people like us who do long distance riding actually restructuring our brains, and do we underestimate the benefits of doing so?

@Machka --being a relative newcomer to these parts, I don't know Rowan, but my best wishes and admiration to both of you! Hope you don't mind my possibly inane blathering.
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Old 01-03-19, 12:21 PM
  #109  
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Originally Posted by Nachoman View Post
I like my gym. My gym has a pool. There are lounge chairs surrounding the pool and each lounge chair has a red flag. When you lay on the lounge chair and flip up the red flag, a waitress comes over to you and takes your order. My gym makes a good bloody mary.
Article about various methods for encouraging people to go the gym: https://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/11/u...o-the-gym.html

More details from one study on this subject: https://static.squarespace.com/stati...at-the-gym.pdf
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Old 01-03-19, 04:32 PM
  #110  
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Just signed my kid up for a new weight trainer coach. He had some line about, sooner or later, if you are dedicated you will hit your genetic limit. I liked that. None of this fantasy you can always get faster. Sometimes you can't. Few see their limits, but nice to have someone think that way.
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Old 01-04-19, 01:48 AM
  #111  
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
If I don't get the muscles going about my daily life, I don't need them.
This.

I joined a gym once. I did the induction. I did well on the cardio stuff, it was the resistance id joined for. But I looked around and just thought to myself, "Damn, I'm not ready to become this miserable."

I push, out there. I always take the stairs, and sprint up them. I volley railings. I don't dodge work, I don't try and find a parking space nearest the entrance... I don't even drive these days.

It's about attitude. People are lazy. They spend all day taking the easy option, then try to make up for it in half hour. I don't get it.
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Old 01-04-19, 02:07 AM
  #112  
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Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
IMO - Having a sedentary job and recognizing the need for additional physical effort via the gym or physical pastimes is a recent but extremely positive development in human health.
I'm not convinced. I know your point but the sedentary job is the problem that needs a more philosophical solution..

There's no way I'd do such a job. I do a job that keeps me fit without breaking me. And that's not luck, I settled there because I was happy with what I got from it. I don't earn a fortune but I wouldn't work in an office for any money. Any.
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Old 01-04-19, 06:36 AM
  #113  
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Originally Posted by MikeyMK View Post
I'm not convinced. I know your point but the sedentary job is the problem that needs a more philosophical solution..

There's no way I'd do such a job. I do a job that keeps me fit without breaking me. And that's not luck, I settled there because I was happy with what I got from it. I don't earn a fortune but I wouldn't work in an office for any money. Any.
Well, you do you. Someone has to do the office jobs, and we need alternatives to work on fitness during the work week. Your "philosophical" way of looking at other people's lives is pretty hilarious, but rather irrelevant to reality for a lot of people.

I have no problem with the idea that a gym is worse than useless to you, why do you think you're in some position to tell me how to live?
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Old 01-04-19, 06:41 AM
  #114  
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Originally Posted by Doge View Post
Just signed my kid up for a new weight trainer coach. He had some line about, sooner or later, if you are dedicated you will hit your genetic limit. I liked that. None of this fantasy you can always get faster. Sometimes you can't. Few see their limits, but nice to have someone think that way.

That does sound like a good approach. There's way too many trainers who hurt people by pushing beyond realistic capacities.
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Old 01-04-19, 07:17 AM
  #115  
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between riding, working and family no time to hit the gym, but I'm sure it enhances fitness levels and overall health
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Old 01-04-19, 09:42 AM
  #116  
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Originally Posted by MikeyMK View Post
I'm not convinced. I know your point but the sedentary job is the problem that needs a more philosophical solution..

There's no way I'd do such a job. I do a job that keeps me fit without breaking me. And that's not luck, I settled there because I was happy with what I got from it. I don't earn a fortune but I wouldn't work in an office for any money. Any.
Circumstance is everything.

I have a similar life philosophy to you about job selection and choices to use daily activities to remain fit, but I don't judge why other people have certain jobs. That's a complicated issue that I'm probably not qualified for because I don't know every persons life history. A large component of my job is trying to motivate people to perform physical tasks when they feel their small effort is not worthwhile so I have adopted the motto "something is better than nothing" and support any attempt at fitness someone makes, no matter where it occurs.

The solution of using a gym to supplement fitness as a result isn't right or wrong. All a gym does is concentrate the opportunities to exercise into one building, usually in an activity specific way. We have two at work - one for residents, one for staff (my facility has 700 residents and 600 staff).

We also should consider region. I haven't been to Miami but I suppose it is a little easier to be active outdoors year round there than say, for someone in Edmonton or Oslo.
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Old 01-04-19, 12:25 PM
  #117  
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Originally Posted by Happy Feet View Post
Circumstance is everything.

I have a similar life philosophy to you about job selection and choices to use daily activities to remain fit, but I don't judge why other people have certain jobs. That's a complicated issue that I'm probably not qualified for because I don't know every persons life history. A large component of my job is trying to motivate people to perform physical tasks when they feel their small effort is not worthwhile so I have adopted the motto "something is better than nothing" and support any attempt at fitness someone makes, no matter where it occurs.

The solution of using a gym to supplement fitness as a result isn't right or wrong. All a gym does is concentrate the opportunities to exercise into one building, usually in an activity specific way. We have two at work - one for residents, one for staff (my facility has 700 residents and 600 staff).

We also should consider region. I haven't been to Miami but I suppose it is a little easier to be active outdoors year round there than say, for someone in Edmonton or Oslo.

You and I are having an agreement-fest! I'd just add that psychological needs and personal preferences vary as much as well.

For me, going to the gym isolates me from distractions at home and in the office that might otherwise detract from the workout. Biking does much the same thing by demanding all of my focus. In the gym, I can distract my mind from the tedium of long cardio by watching a movie. I'd probably be watching the same movie at home, but instead of working out, I'd probably end up eating.

It would be nice to live in a world where no one had to work sedentary jobs, but that not only isn't reality, there's no reason to believe that automation isn't going to do away with a lot more of the non-sedentary ones in the not too distant future.
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Old 01-07-19, 05:02 PM
  #118  
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I never understood how a sane person would opt to go to a gym for exercise, when half the joy of exercise (for me) is being outdooors and enjoying nature and fresh air. Granted, I am 68 years old and when I began working out in the late 1960s, a gym was a place where you went to play basketball. I ran 25 miles a week until my late 40s, then rode a bike to commute to work, and now I ride 4,000 miles or so a year for the pure pleasure of it. Those few times that I went to a gym, the climate-controlled atmosphere and artificial light were suffocating. Maybe I am just a dinosaur.
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Old 01-07-19, 06:28 PM
  #119  
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Originally Posted by daoswald View Post

So for me, the gym has improved my health in areas where cycling leaves a little to be desired. Cycling may still be the majority of my fitness routine but a few days a week working on core strength, and muscle groups that are secondary but still beneficial to cycling makes me a better rider but also more generally fit.


I think doing the gym right can make cyclists better.
I would echo that. Winter is a good time for me to drop some pounds and work on problem areas. Also a time to go to the Y and do the spin classes. I spin about 5-6 times/week and stay an extra hour to get in the needed pedaling. Then its to the mats to stretch and work on core. Add in a few weights and it helps fill in the gaps of cycling.
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Old 01-08-19, 03:52 AM
  #120  
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Originally Posted by MilfordJohn View Post
I never understood how a sane person would opt to go to a gym for exercise, when half the joy of exercise (for me) is being outdooors and enjoying nature and fresh air. Granted, I am 68 years old and when I began working out in the late 1960s, a gym was a place where you went to play basketball. I ran 25 miles a week until my late 40s, then rode a bike to commute to work, and now I ride 4,000 miles or so a year for the pure pleasure of it. Those few times that I went to a gym, the climate-controlled atmosphere and artificial light were suffocating. Maybe I am just a dinosaur.
One word: progressive resistance. Its not only good at the moment, but it's effects last many hours after the session is over. The more muscle you have, the more calories you'll burn even at rest; and no amount of walking, running or cycling will substitute for it.

NOTE: You don't need to go to the gym if you have the equipment you need at home.

Last edited by KraneXL; 01-08-19 at 09:13 AM. Reason: clarity
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Old 01-08-19, 08:48 AM
  #121  
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Originally Posted by MilfordJohn View Post
I never understood how a sane person would opt to go to a gym for exercise, when half the joy of exercise (for me) is being outdooors and enjoying nature and fresh air. Granted, I am 68 years old and when I began working out in the late 1960s, a gym was a place where you went to play basketball. I ran 25 miles a week until my late 40s, then rode a bike to commute to work, and now I ride 4,000 miles or so a year for the pure pleasure of it. Those few times that I went to a gym, the climate-controlled atmosphere and artificial light were suffocating. Maybe I am just a dinosaur.

Your first sentence answers itself--the parenthetical "(for me)" is the key. We exercise for different reasons in different climates, I don't think that puts my sanity into question.

I rode 6600 miles in 2018, but I use the gym to supplement fitness areas not well-served by bicycling and when the weather makes the long-distance riding I do not so "joyful".
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Old 01-08-19, 08:59 AM
  #122  
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Originally Posted by KraneXL View Post
One word: progressive resistance. It not only good at the time, but it's effects last many hours after the work is done. The more muscle you have, the more calories you'll burn even at rest; and no amount of walking, running or cycling will substitute for it.

NOTE: You don't need to go to the gym if you have the equipment you need at home.
*At work

ItsIa problem in this day and age because our legislation is shaped to help us be lazy.

But I have stairs at work, sndthings that are heavy. Others walk up the stairs and use equipment to lift - I sprint up them and man-handle it all.

Course, the '''health'''safety'' guy has to pop me for it because his job is a sham. Fk em. Push where you can, dontd let the clipboards break your fitness down.
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Old 01-08-19, 12:00 PM
  #123  
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Anaerobic vs Aerobic Exercise



In front of the TV now, it's still great for exercise, even though it's 33 years old.
I have never been a big fan of gyms. Too much locker room talk.

In the mid 80's I bought the ugly ergometer pictured below.

It is a Schwinn AirDyne and provides upper body and lower body workouts
at the same time while sitting. Unlike anaerobic weight lifting, the AirDyne
provides a workout which sculpts as well as enhances endurance, without
inflicting joint damage from overstraining, or overloading. You can't drop
the AirDyne on your toes or feet because you're sitting on it or standing
behind it. Because it is based on air resistance, the harder/faster you go,
the greater the resistance. As a 200 pounder, this machine regularly
provided 1,300 cal hour burn rates when I rode it hard when i was younger.

A combination of standing and sitting workouts on this machine totalling
one half to one hour per day of use gave me a sveldte, six pack look and
I felt great. Never ran faster in my life. Tremendous acceleration. A great
machine for intervals - - cools you as you exercise.

Find one used cheap and it's all the gym and free weights you ever need.

Last edited by slowrevs; 01-10-19 at 12:18 PM. Reason: typo fix
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Old 01-08-19, 12:10 PM
  #124  
wgscott
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Originally Posted by MilfordJohn View Post
I never understood how a sane person would opt to go to a gym for exercise, when half the joy of exercise (for me) is being outdooors and enjoying nature and fresh air.
When it is raining 4" to 5" per day, there is a limit to how much nature you get to enjoy.

For many people, it is a choice between the gym and being sessile, not gym vs. Class 5-A wilderness experiences.
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Old 01-08-19, 12:29 PM
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just got back from the gym at lunch & going again after work. at the last place I worked, I did other stuff at lunchtime such as, outdoor basketball, outdoor track running, rode my bike or walked the indoor mall in the winter. just can't sit during lunch cuz I'm sitting before & after lunch!
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