Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

The pros and cons of mom-and-pop bicycle shops.

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

The pros and cons of mom-and-pop bicycle shops.

Reply

Old 01-23-19, 01:47 PM
  #1  
JonBailey
Schwinn Discovery
Thread Starter
 
JonBailey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 84
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 137 Post(s)
The pros and cons of mom-and-pop bicycle shops.

CONS

1. In my experience some are unfriendly towards customers but not all of them are.
2. Many don't have a liberal return policy on parts and accessories even for items that don't fit correctly.
3. Some don't like it when the customers ask questions about warranty coverage on new bicycles.
One time I asked a shop if routine adjustment on brakes and gears was covered on new bike purchases
and I couldn't seem to get a straight answer.
4. These shops can be quite expensive for new bikes, parts, service and accessories.

PROS

You can find quality-made bicycles there albeit more expensive than BSOs. Unfortunately, I can't find quality brands like Cannondale listed on amazon.com
where returns are easy and liberal. I can find Cannondale from independent bicycle stores online, but their return policy might not be liberal like amazon or Walmart.

Cannondale is a quality bicycle but it might be yours for keeps once purchased by you. It might be best to buy a Cannondale at one of those pesky LBS's where at least
you can try one on for size to see if it fits you and inspect it for damage before buying. You might be better off buying aftermarket parts and accessories from places like Walmart or amazon.com where the returns are liberal and easy and the prices more reasonable.

Do you find your LBS to have friendly, knowledgeable and helpful staff?
Do they treat you right if you have to take your new bicycle in for work under warranty?
Do you even like their return policy?

Does Cannondale even offer a decent parts/labor warranty or some kind of customer-satisfaction guarantee on all its new bicycles?
Pacific Cycles, a BSO company, pays for parts but not for labor to fix manufacturing defects. You may need to buy a SquareTrade plan on top
of a new bike purchase because many manufacturer's warranties are crappy these days.

Last edited by JonBailey; 01-23-19 at 02:04 PM.
JonBailey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 02:27 PM
  #2  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 21,439
Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7810 Post(s)
They can be handy if one is out on a ride or tour, and have a critical failure.

I've never understood whey department stores just completely ignore things like 700x23 or 700x25 tires.

Anyway, there are quite a few things that one just can't find a suitable replacement, or any replacement without either going to a bike shop or ordering online.

There are also quite a few people who don't wish to do their own basic bike maintenance, and would rather push their bike to a bike store than to fix a flat.
CliffordK is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 02:36 PM
  #3  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
TimothyH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 12,906

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 196 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5737 Post(s)
Originally Posted by JonBailey View Post
Cannondale is a quality bicycle but it might be yours for keeps once purchased by you. It might be best to buy a Cannondale at one of those pesky LBS's where at least you can try one on for size to see if it fits you and inspect it for damage before buying.
REI eliminates this concern.


-Tim-
TimothyH is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 02:59 PM
  #4  
jefnvk
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit/AA
Posts: 8,163

Bikes: 2016 Novara Mazama

Mentioned: 60 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3531 Post(s)
Didn't we just get done with this topic?

Pros: To someone who doesn't know what they are doing, they can be a great resource. Some of them have great staff.

Cons: To someone who does know what they are doing, they generally can't or won't compete (especially leaving the type of riding their particular store caters to), and they force me to listen to people insist that my free money should go towards propping them up because of geographic proximity than selecting a less local retailer that suits my needs and style. Also some of them have staff that would be working at Wal-Mart if Wal-Mart had called back on their application first, whom I don't want anywhere near my bike.

Last edited by jefnvk; 01-23-19 at 03:15 PM.
jefnvk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 03:06 PM
  #5  
Ogsarg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Hollister, CA (not the surf town)
Posts: 543

Bikes: 2009 Specialized Roubaix, early 90's Giant Iguana

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 222 Post(s)
An independent is less likely to allow the return of a bike cause they end up losing money. They end up stuck with a bike that they can't sell new and generally end up losing money; probably a substantial loss and even if you buy a different bike it may not make up for what they lose on the return. In a low volume shop, this could mean the difference between making a living or going out of business.

Large retailers amortize the loss of that return over a large sales volume and those costs are spread across all their products. At the end of the day, someone has to make up that loss.

I don't think people should expect to be able to return a bike just cause they find they like something better. Can you do that with a new car?
Ogsarg is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 03:12 PM
  #6  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 39,623

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 167 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6185 Post(s)
What you See depends on where you Look

How many have you worked in for a year or more?

I know nothing about Boise Idaho and It's bike shops I can only comment on the *one I live near.
(or have worked for, in the past..)
I help LBS here in the summer.. the bike inventory is reflective of the place we are and the money people are willing to part with..

Yours sell Skiing Gear in the winter?



Cannondale has its dealer network Local here is not one.. Material flaws warrantee usually 1 year components
Trek lifetime on frame


Read the manual for details ..








...






...

Last edited by fietsbob; 01-24-19 at 11:03 AM.
fietsbob is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 03:21 PM
  #7  
livedarklions
Michegas Cup Winner
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 2,396

Bikes: Trek FX 3; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; "Motobecane" Fantom CX

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1174 Post(s)
Some are great, some are good, some are pretty good, some suck, although the ones that suck tend to go out of business. Next question.
livedarklions is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 03:25 PM
  #8  
Elvo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 4,005
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 322 Post(s)
Just about all of them will fix anything that's defective or will warranty it through the manufacturer.
Elvo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 05:18 PM
  #9  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
mtb_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 3,638
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2682 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Ogsarg View Post
An independent is less likely to allow the return of a bike cause they end up losing money. They end up stuck with a bike that they can't sell new and generally end up losing money; probably a substantial loss and even if you buy a different bike it may not make up for what they lose on the return. In a low volume shop, this could mean the difference between making a living or going out of business.

Large retailers amortize the loss of that return over a large sales volume and those costs are spread across all their products. At the end of the day, someone has to make up that loss.

I don't think people should expect to be able to return a bike just cause they find they like something better. Can you do that with a new car?
Return like Walmart take everything back policy contribute to moral decay of society. You have people buy something, use once, then return for full refund.
mtb_addict is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 05:21 PM
  #10  
mtb_addict
Senior Member
 
mtb_addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 3,638
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2682 Post(s)
I can see a mom&pop store successful in a small college town. College student don't have time and space to do bike maintenance...just take it into a cheap mom&pop shop.

But in my big city, I don't think they are survive the high rent and fuzzy clientele of recreational cyclists.
mtb_addict is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 05:36 PM
  #11  
alcjphil
Senior Member
 
alcjphil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 2,836
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 493 Post(s)
Originally Posted by JonBailey View Post
CONS

1. In my experience some are unfriendly towards customers but not all of them are.
2. Many don't have a liberal return policy on parts and accessories even for items that don't fit correctly.
3. Some don't like it when the customers ask questions about warranty coverage on new bicycles.
One time I asked a shop if routine adjustment on brakes and gears was covered on new bike purchases
and I couldn't seem to get a straight answer.
4. These shops can be quite expensive for new bikes, parts, service and accessories.

PROS

You can find quality-made bicycles there albeit more expensive than BSOs. Unfortunately, I can't find quality brands like Cannondale listed on amazon.com
where returns are easy and liberal. I can find Cannondale from independent bicycle stores online, but their return policy might not be liberal like amazon or Walmart.

Cannondale is a quality bicycle but it might be yours for keeps once purchased by you. It might be best to buy a Cannondale at one of those pesky LBS's where at least
you can try one on for size to see if it fits you and inspect it for damage before buying. You might be better off buying aftermarket parts and accessories from places like Walmart or amazon.com where the returns are liberal and easy and the prices more reasonable.

Do you find your LBS to have friendly, knowledgeable and helpful staff?
Do they treat you right if you have to take your new bicycle in for work under warranty?
Do you even like their return policy?

Does Cannondale even offer a decent parts/labor warranty or some kind of customer-satisfaction guarantee on all its new bicycles?
Pacific Cycles, a BSO company, pays for parts but not for labor to fix manufacturing defects. You may need to buy a SquareTrade plan on top
of a new bike purchase because many manufacturer's warranties are crappy these days.
All this coming from someone from someone who recently bought a bargain basement online bike? PLEASE, give me a break
alcjphil is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 05:40 PM
  #12  
alcjphil
Senior Member
 
alcjphil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 2,836
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 493 Post(s)
The OP is so out of touch with the current bike scene that he imagines that the Cannondale brand is in any way better than any other well known bike brand out there
alcjphil is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 05:57 PM
  #13  
base2 
Senior Member
 
base2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 592

Bikes: N+1

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 287 Post(s)
The only "Mom & Pop" I go to is a boutique bike manufacturer. They start with tubes in their basement & sell whole bikes at the street level shop. The book keeping goes on upstairs. I only go to them for their knowledge and flawless execution of skill. They are expensive. They are also a very good deal since money spent there is never wasted on what I don't need and always guarenteed to be right the first time.

The big "pro" is often times they have things in stock that haven't been made in 20 years that would be as rare as hens teeth or unavailable otherwise. Think along the lines of an Arai drum brake tandem hub, maybe even the drum brake itself.

The "con" is some of the bigger things or more common high dollar specialty things they have to order & I can find the same item on SJS, or others, for much cheaper, sooner & tax free owing to exchange rates. Big picture though, in the end usually it's a wash when shipping times & labor rates are factored in. Think along the lines of a customer coming in with new Son 28 dynamo hub, who went to the trouble to obtain a NOS discontinued rim...now the wheel still needs to be built. Or something similar. After all was said & done they have the supply network connections to be able to locate the specialty item & get it done saving the customer all the leg work. The cost difference to the customer would have been about the same +/- local sales tax.

Generally speaking their miscellaneous parts bin has exactly the right part that would be a devil to find & overpriced to obtain on Amazon & impossible to be in stock due to low sales volume from a national chain. This is the reason there will never be the extinction of LBS. It's just the ones that adapted to remain viable where the internet fails will be harder to come by.

Last edited by base2; 01-23-19 at 06:10 PM.
base2 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 06:06 PM
  #14  
radroad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 330
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 266 Post(s)
That's a good point. The takeoff parts bins often have high quality parts at great prices. I've been able to stock up on and try various types of saddles over the years with minimal risk due to takeoffs.

An LBS is great for test rides as well. Or at least some are. The local shops limit test rides to 10 minutes.

Overall, I find little use for them since I have three bikes and can always ride another one while I wait for a part or parts to be delivered.

As OP has stated, I'm tired of dealing with unscrupulous shops.
radroad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 07:17 PM
  #15  
JonBailey
Schwinn Discovery
Thread Starter
 
JonBailey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 84
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 137 Post(s)
Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
I can see a mom&pop store successful in a small college town. College student don't have time and space to do bike maintenance...just take it into a cheap mom&pop shop.

But in my big city, I don't think they are survive the high rent and fuzzy clientele of recreational cyclists.
In Boise, ID there are a chain of George's Cycle shops which sell Specialized and Cannondale. The one further uptown has nicer staff. The one in downtown, however, has dorky staff.
But here in Boise, ID there are no "cheap bike shops" except Walmart, Sears and Target. Bob's Bicycles is high-priced too and there is a grumpy old man inside the store. Bike shops since the 1970's have changed. They offered "red-carpet" service to customers. They had no Walmart, Ebay or amazon.com to contend with back then. Only Sears, Montgomery Wards, Kmart, JC Penny and Western Auto. I'm thinking the next bike I buy will be a decent brand. More importantly, one has to choose the right shop. Thank god I was an auto mechanic by trade formerly and can do most of my wrenching at home. Young college students have parents who will pay high bike shop repair bills for those expensive bikes they buy them. No, I don't expect to be able to return my new Toyota truck to a dealer if I should find out I don't like it. I can test-drive a new Toyota truck at a dealer before buying, however. I know my new Toyota truck will be well-covered in the event of mechanical failures under warranty and manufacturer recalls. I was hoping Cannondale had Toyota quality in a bicycle with the same Toyota level of customer service and product backing. One thing that has changed these days is product backing has often gotten skimpier from manufacturers and consumers don't have the same level of protection from the government agencies as they did in the 1970's and 1980's. There should be a federal Lemon Law for new bicycles and new motorcycles as well as for new cars. IT, computer hardware and computer software consumers should also be protected by lemon laws. Yes, I am a David Horowitz type of consumer rights advocate of old school. I'm sick of unscrupulous manufacturers, merchants, dealers and vendors who take my money in exchange for crap and offer little to no service and without a smile at that.

Last edited by JonBailey; 01-23-19 at 07:28 PM.
JonBailey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 07:24 PM
  #16  
TiHabanero
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,015
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 554 Post(s)
It is amazing the number of folks who have little to none good things to say about the shops they have dealt with over time. I have worked in 4 different shops, two of which were multi store shops in which I worked at all 5 locations, and have not experienced negative encounters with customers on the level I consistently read about on this forum. Even when I go into shops in other cities the experience is always good. Wonder what I am doing wrong?
TiHabanero is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 07:27 PM
  #17  
TiHabanero
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,015
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 554 Post(s)
"One thing that has changed these days is product backing has often gotten skimpier from manufacturers and consumers don't have the same level of protection from
the government agencies as they did in the 1970's and 1980's."

This is quite a misstatement. My nephew is in the business of consumer protection as a plaintiff attorney and he says things are much, much, much better for consumers now than in the 70's and 80's.
TiHabanero is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 07:50 PM
  #18  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 2,908
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1083 Post(s)
I have three dedicated shops in my locale that I have visited in the last year.

One, I tried to work with but found continuously frustrating. The owner acted like the guru expert in his little kingdom so I just decided not to return after strike three. They would never register that as a negative complaint.

Second has a nice owner but is geared more towards upscale roadie type cycling which isn't my style. I drop by occasionally to see what might be new. They would probably see me as just another customer lookyloo. I occasionally buy stuff I like there.

Third, the owner is helpful and willing to work with the styles I'm into. I consider that my shop. However, sometimes he isn't able to get what I want from his suppliers so I go online. I promote his store to others.

Fourth might be the MEC, which is the Canadian version of REI, which I like. The staff has no pressure to sell and are usually pretty laid back and into the same lifestyle choices I am so there is a commonality.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 01-23-19 at 07:55 PM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 09:38 PM
  #19  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 5,015

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Pink Klein MTB, Phil Wood VeloXS Frame (that will soon have DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1105 Post(s)
Unfortunately a lot of those "cons" seem to be related to a very tiny number of shops or small bad experiences that can be had anywhere at any time for any number of reasons. Also generally a pros and cons list starts with the pros first. It is very easy to malign an entire group of something because of one small bad incident or massive groupthink or something like that, look at racism, sexism, speciesism, homophobia, transphobia...
A good number of these incidents can be easily solved by keeping calm and respectful throughout the process and talking with the manager or owner. Also realizing that our time is valuable and we aren't a free service that is subsidized by anyone and while we love bikes, we cannot work for free.

As someone who does warranty work quite a bit with various different cycling companies, I have found most are quite good with warranties. Specialized for instance has a lifetime warranty for the original owner on their frames and literally replaced an 11 year old frame for me with little fuss. Light and Motion has replaced countless lights for myself and co-workers and customers. Focus/Gazelle has gone above and beyond so many times to help out clients it is crazy. Those are just a few. There are plenty more out there. Sometimes warranties can be a little fuzzy and hard to remember because let's face it I have a lot of knowledge on bikes and parts and repair that sometimes knowing the legalese is tough to remember. Usually that is outlined on the company website or via the owners manual for those still doing print copies.

Generally most shops will offer some sort of tune up after some riding. Some offer more tune ups after that and some don't, it just depends on the shop and one way or the other doesn't matter too much.

As far as liberal return policies, those are terrible and if you don't know what you are buying, don't buy it. I can understand returning something defective but returning something because you chose to buy the wrong thing or because you decided you couldn't afford it or you refused to try it on in the store, is ridiculous. I don't walk into a store wondering about returns because if that is my end goal or a main worry then I probably shouldn't go in. You don't go to a restaurant order an appetizer and when it comes out and you eat a bite decide, no I actually don't want it (at least normal people don't) why should it be so different here.

If your local shop has some issues, talk with the owner in a calm respectful tone and give them helpful feedback that is constructive so they can improve. A lot of folks say "I had a bad experience so I am done" and don't give anyone a chance to right their wrong. You have to give people a chance to change and better themselves. This is why so many people who get out of prison, cannot get jobs and housing because "you were bad at one point and their is no chance of you having changed according to my narrow mind".


I have had plenty of customers that are an absolute joy to work with and some that no matter how much you bend over backwards for them and treat them with the utmost respect they still walk over you and treat you like garbage and then you are to blame because they are just nasty people.

So hey everyone let's maybe stop the blind hatred of bike shops unless one particular one has done you so wrong and not even tried to correct it after you were calm and respectful the entire time and didn't go to unreasonable levels. If that happens then talk about that shop and only that shop and don't attack an entire industry. Some of us actually work hard and enjoy our jobs, if you don't maybe you should try working in the cycling or outdoor retail industry it is way more fun than sitting at cubicle.
veganbikes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 09:47 PM
  #20  
radroad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 330
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 266 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
I don't believe the world is ready to be done with them.
Book stores have all but vanished. Most mom and pop retail stores have vanished, aside from restaurants. Brick and mortar bike shops could very well become just as rare. Brick and mortar retailers are taking a beating. They can't compete with online sales. 90% of the time a brief video tutorial and basic tools are all you need for any maintenance work. Mobile repair services can take care of the rest.

At most I visit a bike shop a few times a year. Many years it's never. If you don't NEED to ride (which covers just about everyone with a steady income) you can wait a few days for parts delivery. Lots of the local shops like to play games and act like they're booked to the gills anyway, even in winter. Overall, bike shop owners and employees tend to be horrible businessmen.

Bikes are not that complicated. Most maintenance work is incredibly simple and few tools are required. You also get a bit of satisfaction from doing your own work. In a pinch, you can ask people you know for a referral for a neighbor who's handy with bikes.

Online shopping offers an extraordinary advantage in selection compared to any particular local store and the price advantage is often significant. Either hundreds of millions or billions of consumers are deluded or there are actual tangible benefits to online shopping. I for one refuse to stick my head in the sand about the matter.
radroad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 09:52 PM
  #21  
JonBailey
Schwinn Discovery
Thread Starter
 
JonBailey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 84
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 137 Post(s)
Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
Unfortunately a lot of those "cons" seem to be related to a very tiny number of shops or small bad experiences that can be had anywhere at any time for any number of reasons. Also generally a pros and cons list starts with the pros first. It is very easy to malign an entire group of something because of one small bad incident or massive groupthink or something like that, look at racism, sexism, speciesism, homophobia, transphobia...
A good number of these incidents can be easily solved by keeping calm and respectful throughout the process and talking with the manager or owner. Also realizing that our time is valuable and we aren't a free service that is subsidized by anyone and while we love bikes, we cannot work for free.

As someone who does warranty work quite a bit with various different cycling companies, I have found most are quite good with warranties. Specialized for instance has a lifetime warranty for the original owner on their frames and literally replaced an 11 year old frame for me with little fuss. Light and Motion has replaced countless lights for myself and co-workers and customers. Focus/Gazelle has gone above and beyond so many times to help out clients it is crazy. Those are just a few. There are plenty more out there. Sometimes warranties can be a little fuzzy and hard to remember because let's face it I have a lot of knowledge on bikes and parts and repair that sometimes knowing the legalese is tough to remember. Usually that is outlined on the company website or via the owners manual for those still doing print copies.

Generally most shops will offer some sort of tune up after some riding. Some offer more tune ups after that and some don't, it just depends on the shop and one way or the other doesn't matter too much.

As far as liberal return policies, those are terrible and if you don't know what you are buying, don't buy it. I can understand returning something defective but returning something because you chose to buy the wrong thing or because you decided you couldn't afford it or you refused to try it on in the store, is ridiculous. I don't walk into a store wondering about returns because if that is my end goal or a main worry then I probably shouldn't go in. You don't go to a restaurant order an appetizer and when it comes out and you eat a bite decide, no I actually don't want it (at least normal people don't) why should it be so different here.

If your local shop has some issues, talk with the owner in a calm respectful tone and give them helpful feedback that is constructive so they can improve. A lot of folks say "I had a bad experience so I am done" and don't give anyone a chance to right their wrong. You have to give people a chance to change and better themselves. This is why so many people who get out of prison, cannot get jobs and housing because "you were bad at one point and their is no chance of you having changed according to my narrow mind".


I have had plenty of customers that are an absolute joy to work with and some that no matter how much you bend over backwards for them and treat them with the utmost respect they still walk over you and treat you like garbage and then you are to blame because they are just nasty people.

So hey everyone let's maybe stop the blind hatred of bike shops unless one particular one has done you so wrong and not even tried to correct it after you were calm and respectful the entire time and didn't go to unreasonable levels. If that happens then talk about that shop and only that shop and don't attack an entire industry. Some of us actually work hard and enjoy our jobs, if you don't maybe you should try working in the cycling or outdoor retail industry it is way more fun than sitting at cubicle.
If I were to buy a more expensive bike, say a new Cannondale for $630 from George's Cycles, I could only expect the proper product baking and good service to go with it. This is what I have known over my lifetime and what I've grown to expect.

Of course, I would check Google and Yelp! for customer reviews of bike shops first. The Cannondale Quick 6 700C fitness bicycle gets nothing but 4 and 5 stars from people, mostly 5.
The Quick models are road-oriented with mountain-bike looks. They can go on laid-back unpaved trails as in parks. A hybrid, city or comfort bike. All the same to me. The Quick models are Cannondale's under $1,000 models. I'm not an off-road extremist, a mountain goat or a rock crawler.

I might have a challenge finding correct-fitting aftermarket fenders for this bike and perhaps a decent rear rack/dual-pannier system. Of course I need my fat spring seat and tall ape handlebar. The tall 9.50" ape bar by Wald can even be had in black to match the Quick's blackout trim style.

Imagine if you bought a brand new $50,000 King Ranch truck and the transmission quit a month later. Imagine if the dealer said, "Ford won't cover the labor just the parts. You will pay us $1,500 to put in a new transmission."

Last edited by JonBailey; 01-23-19 at 10:02 PM.
JonBailey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 10:12 PM
  #22  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 5,015

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Pink Klein MTB, Phil Wood VeloXS Frame (that will soon have DA 7400), Cilo Road Frame

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1105 Post(s)
Originally Posted by JonBailey View Post
If I buy a more expensive bike, I expect the proper product baking and good service to go with it. This is what I have known over my lifetime and what I've grown to expect.

Imagine if you bought a brand new $50,000 King Ranch truck and the transmission quit a month later. Imagine if the dealer said, "Ford won't cover the labor just the parts. You will pay us $1,500 to put in a new transmission."
You did quote me but didn't really respond to what I said, However yes if you buy a good quality bike and take care of it and it is still within warranty then most companies will take care of you. As I stated generally most shops will give you at least one free tune up and sometimes more.

If you blow your transmission that quickly and not due to a manufacturer defect then yes you would pay but if it was something that would be covered under warranty then that should generally be covered. I wouldn't buy an expensive showy truck like that though (bikes, yes). I would buy something sensible and practical and something I wouldn't have to help friends move with ; )

However on a bicycle things like chains, brake pads, cassettes, cables, housing, tubes, tires, etc are all wear items and if you wear them out you will need to replace them so unless it was a manufacturer defect it wouldn't be covered under anything. If you go to another shop to get the bike fixed they will charge you and no we won't reimburse you. Certainly if we make a mistake we will fix it and usually give you a small period of time to ride the bike and bring it back if their are still issues. Warranty stuff is usually quite rare and doesn't happen super often with decent quality products.

Sometimes we replace cables and they stretch/settle in and need a little tightening so within 30 days (at least for my shop) you bring it back and we will take care of you. We generally try to take care of our customers and again a lot of the companies we work with try to take care of our customers as well and help us out.

The most important thing to owning a bike is taking care of it and keeping it regularly maintained both in the shop and at home. You do that and you are less likely to need major work but if you do need it we are here to help.

EDITS: You should see a fitter.

Also the Quick 6 looks like a lower end hybrid with a full aluminum frame and fork. It may not be a super comfortable ride. The quick 4 has a carbon fork which will cut out some weight but add some useful vibration dampening which will add some comfort back in. The components in some cases are upgraded and others are similar to the 6. If you had bought from a shop you would have been able to try different models and find one that works best for you. Also you could have tried different brands and found something better. If you are interested in an upright position, the Specialized Roll Elite would be a decent choice and the very wide tires make up for the aluminum frame and fork. You might take a look at that for your next bike.

Last edited by veganbikes; 01-23-19 at 10:22 PM. Reason: OP edited his post.
veganbikes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-19, 10:55 PM
  #23  
zoolzoo
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 39
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
con - expensive, can be snooty

pro - can drive there, service plans
zoolzoo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-19, 06:49 AM
  #24  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 21,075
Mentioned: 150 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7732 Post(s)
A mom & pop shop built me this. (Actually, pop built it. Mom is a law librarian.) And in my very large city there are plenty of independent shops doing well. In fact, several have opened in the last decade.



indyfabz is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-19, 07:05 AM
  #25  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 21,075
Mentioned: 150 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7732 Post(s)
Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
Didn't we just get done with this topic?
IKR. It's deja vu all over again.
indyfabz is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service