General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Question about components

Old 01-24-19, 03:58 PM
  #1  
Larsenex
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Larsenex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Ventura, California
Posts: 9

Bikes: Current > Trek mtb

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Question about components

Greeting again,

Not sure about the policy on links to a web page with a bike so if this is against the rules just delete it. This is the bike I am looking at right now.



I am not familiar with where the shifting action is on this bike. > SRAM Apex 1x10-Speed (on the brake?)
Also can someone explain the chain ring ratios and what they mean. This bike uses > SunRace 10-Speed, 11-42T. Is this pretty much a normal set?

Thanks again.
Larsenex is offline  
Old 01-24-19, 04:22 PM
  #2  
JanMM
rebmeM roineS
 
JanMM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Metro Indy, IN
Posts: 15,406

Bikes: RANS V3 ti, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 456 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Don't see a link - probably because you don't yet have enough posts.
Apex single ring shifters seem to be available for both drop bar and flat bar bikes. Brifters (shifting integrated with brake levers) or trigger shifters.
Apex-1 cranksets available with several different size rings. 11-42 cassette provides for wide range. https://www.sram.com/sram/road/produ...350-1-crankset
__________________
RANS V3 Ti, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

Last edited by JanMM; 01-24-19 at 06:11 PM.
JanMM is offline  
Old 01-24-19, 06:24 PM
  #3  
Ironfish653
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Virginia Beach
Posts: 897

Bikes: 1997 Cannondale, 1976 Bridgestone, 1998 Softride

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 293 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 6 Posts
11-42t refers to the range of your cassette (rear cogs) You have a 10-step cassette with a small cog of 11t and a big cog of 42t. 11-42 is a pretty versatile range. You use it with a single chainring that would be about the size of the small ring on a 'standard' road crank (in your case, a 42t,) to provide a decent range of climbing ability and adequate top speed.

As far as the shifter controls, there is a little paddle right behind the brake lever. All road shifters use a similar placement, but actual function varies from Shimano, SRAM and Campagnolo. The guys at the shop should be able to show you how to operate the controls. They're pretty intuitive once you've got your hands on them.


Last edited by Ironfish653; 01-24-19 at 06:41 PM.
Ironfish653 is offline  
Old 01-24-19, 07:57 PM
  #4  
Carverbiker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 92
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The ratios can be seen with this gear calculator Bicycle Gear Calculator in the drop down boxes they have the cassette for this bike and then under the display drop down select speed and it will give you the speeds for each combination. If you know how fast you typically ride on the various types of terrain, this will give you a good idea if your gearing is too high or too low relative to your needs.

The bike pictured has Sram road shifters on it, in order to shifter to a higher gear, smaller cog you push the lever to the left with a short push. To shift to a lower gear, larger cog you push the same lever but give it a longer push/throw.

Last edited by Carverbiker; 01-24-19 at 08:00 PM.
Carverbiker is offline  
Old 01-25-19, 09:45 AM
  #5  
Larsenex
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Larsenex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Ventura, California
Posts: 9

Bikes: Current > Trek mtb

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
This is soo Cool!
Right now I am using shimano shifters on my MTB. The bike above looks really close to the bike I am looking and yes I do not have enough points to post links which I will eventually overcome.

With this particular shifter shown above, can I shift gears using my right index finger while 'standing up' and ascending a sizable hill? While putting hard stress on it will it still smoothly change gears? My mountain bike is 'fair to poor' as I need to change the derailleur and chain rings, under heavy ascending load it can sometimes slip.

My ride to work is normally all roads. There is a hill near work that has a fairly steep but very short hill. A good amount of speed can quickly ascend it but going home its steeper and has a hair pin curve with no lane so I am in traffic fighting for space going up hill and contending with the 5 O' clock rush home. My solution was extreme visibility and to just blast up it as fast as I can while being super mindful of the tired and distracted drivers.

Can someone direct me to the proper 'geometry' for how a road bike is supposed to fit? I really suspect I have been riding my mtb incorrectly all these years and I will have terrible habit which need to be changed once I change. For example a coworker noticed on her way home that my knees 'extend' out from the bike when I ride which I think means i am not high enough up.

Inseam > 31-32" I have a long torso propotionally I think being 5'7"+ a 1/4 inch or so.
Larsenex is offline  
Old 01-25-19, 10:41 AM
  #6  
JanMM
rebmeM roineS
 
JanMM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Metro Indy, IN
Posts: 15,406

Bikes: RANS V3 ti, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 456 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
One very general rule of thumb for all bikes is that at with leg at furthest extension, there just be just a bit of a bend at the knee. This is with leg at "6 o'clock" position for most bikes. (on my recumbent bikes my legs are out in front so it's more like "3 o'clock".)
__________________
RANS V3 Ti, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
JanMM is offline  
Old 01-25-19, 11:35 AM
  #7  
curbtender
Senior Member
 
curbtender's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SF Bay Area, East bay
Posts: 5,328

Bikes: Marinoni, Kestral 200 2002 Trek 5200, KHS Flite, Koga Miyata, Schwinn Spitfire 5, Schwinn Speedster, Mondia Special, Univega Alpina, Miyata team Ti, MB3

Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 468 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
At 5'7", you should be looking at a medium bike. Go to a bike store and try a few out.
curbtender is online now  
Old 01-25-19, 12:06 PM
  #8  
tyrion
Senior Member
 
tyrion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 2,169

Bikes: Breezer Radar

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1125 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by Larsenex View Post
With this particular shifter shown above, can I shift gears using my right index finger while 'standing up' and ascending a sizable hill?
No. The trick is to ease up on pedal pressure for an instant, shift, keep pedalling lightly until the gear change is complete, then back to full pressure. You never stop pedalling, just ease up on pressure. When you get the hang of it it takes about half a second.

On really steep hills this can be difficult/impossible, so you should get in the right gear before the real steep part.
tyrion is offline  
Old 01-25-19, 12:56 PM
  #9  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,663
Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1152 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Larsenex View Post
With this particular shifter shown above, can I shift gears using my right index finger while 'standing up' and ascending a sizable hill?
Yes, the main advantage to integrating the shifter into the brake lever on road bikes is to allow easy shifting while standing. It's more difficult to simultaneously stand and shift with old-school road shifters on the handlebar ends or especially the bike's downtube. However...

While putting hard stress on it will it still smoothly change gears? My mountain bike is 'fair to poor' as I need to change the derailleur and chain rings, under heavy ascending load it can sometimes slip.
...it's not good practice to force a rough gear change under heavy chain tension. Modern drivetrains tolerate it pretty well, but it's still good to alter your power stroke during the shift to allow it to change gears under lower tension.

But even more importantly, you should try not to get yourself into a situation where you're desperate for the next lower gear. Downshift before you're mashing slowly at the cranks.
HTupolev is online now  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.