Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Bike shoes, clip vrs clipless and is it difficult to transition?

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Bike shoes, clip vrs clipless and is it difficult to transition?

Reply

Old 01-31-19, 08:14 AM
  #26  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 22,077

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 73 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2786 Post(s)
with the right amount of tension, if you forget, your foot pops out anyway with the motion of putting your foot out & down. at least that was my experience the cpl times I wasn't thinking. or maybe I don't have to think anymore & I just uncleat naturally?
rumrunn6 is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-19, 08:32 AM
  #27  
Ironfish653
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Virginia Beach
Posts: 818

Bikes: 1997 Cannondale, 1976 Bridgestone, 1998 Softride

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 264 Post(s)
Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
If we're going to go that way, here's flats vs clipless for me:
- Clipless: feet got hotspots and numbness every ride. Cheap Flats: Most of that went away. Expensive Flats: All of it went away, feet feel great at the end of the ride.
- Clipless: Constant hassle in switching shoes before and after each ride. Flats: Switch shoes once, I'm good for the rest of the day. Only need to wear shoes where I'm going.
- Clipless: Slight mental load in remembering I was wearing clipless. Flats: More relaxing ride without thinking about it.
Speaking of strawmen; Hotspots and numbness go pretty much to the shoes, not the pedals. That, and the way your feet fit in them. There are literally hundreds of clipless compatible shoes. I have a very hard time believing that every single one of them (even the selection in your LBS) causes you the same symptoms. (that and your assumption that all clipless shoes do, too)

Switching shoes: I usually put my shoes on right before I go out. My Pearl Izumi SPD shoes have laces; they go on just like any other shoe I have. They also look like chunky trainers, and wear about like my work (safety) shoes. The soles work pretty much like a trainer, too, other than the occasional click when I'm on a hard floor. (probably don't want to wear them around ceramic or marble tiles, though) They can pass as regular shoes anywhere that doesn't require PPE or professional dress.

Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
If you're so tired you don't know where your feet are, I'd say you should probably be worried, as should anyone in your vicinity.
This is a lot coming from someone whose main concerns with clipless is the 'mental load' required to use them. I'm with @79pmooney , after 80+ miles in the saddle, the fine motor coordination in your legs is pretty much done. You either can't feel anything, or it all hurts. If you're on a challenging ride, I'd say there's more 'mental effort' required to maintain foot placement on a flat pedal. With clipless, it's literally a no-brainer. Your foot is attached to the pedal, like it or not, until you decide it doesn't need to be.


Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
But you're strawmanning your argument about pulling up. It's not that you "can't" it's that the claims about it's supposed greater efficiency are unfounded and it seems to be the opposite that people who force themselves to pull up are pedalling less efficiently than the people who win races - who do not pull up. At least in their regular stroke.

I don't know if pulling up is possible for short sprints, it seems to be hard to study, I mention it as I don't want to get into making claims of racing-level speed where 20 seconds is the difference between 1st and 3rd place as that's not a field I have much experience in. But the post above was about commuting to work not pro racing.
I'm going to skip the studies on pro-level riders and talk in terms of the 'sport' riders that most of us are here.
It's true that you make the most power on the 'push down' segment of the pedal stroke. That's where you primarily use your quads, which are the largest muscles in your body. They are not, however the only muscles in your legs. 'Spinning circles' or 'push-forward, pull-back' engages the other muscles in your legs as well, like the calves, hamstrings, glutes, and things like hip flexors and abductors. Now, these muscles are far les powerful than the quads, so you don't make much power out of them.
What it does do, or can do, is take some of the peak effort off of the quads, say for a seated climb on a steep hill. By using more muscle groups, you are also expending more energy, but because the peak load is not as high as just the 'push-push-push' the perceived effort is lower. In effect, it 'feels easier' even if it's actually more work.
Ironfish653 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-19, 08:38 AM
  #28  
mynewnchome
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 140

Bikes: Cannondale CAAD8 Raleigh Revenio 1.0

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
I too was nervous about the learning curve, I found it good to get used to the process using a trainer, less chance of falling. However, always make sure your trainer is snug on the bike, I put mine on in a hurry one day and it came loose mid pedal, on the way to the floor my arm caught my reloading press bolt, so yes, it is possible to get hurt on a trainer while clipped in, lesson learned. But it got me used to the process and comfortable using them.

mynewnchome is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-19, 10:36 AM
  #29  
DomaneS5
Fredly Fredster
 
DomaneS5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 526

Bikes: Trek Domane S5, Trek 1.1c, Motobecane Omni Strada Comp, Trek X-Caliber 6

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 178 Post(s)
Transition to clipless is not bad, but I would suggest practicing in an empty parking lot, before taking the maiden voyage. I've fallen 4 times by not clipping out on in time over the past 6 years. Only 2 of those instances were witnessed by someone. The other 2 happened in my driveway when nobody was looking.
DomaneS5 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-19, 11:59 AM
  #30  
surak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Seattle
Posts: 529

Bikes: Giant Contend SL Disc 2, Priority Continuum Onyx, Santana Vision, Kent Dual-Drive Tandem, Priority Classic

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 190 Post(s)
After going to clipless, I realized how much I disliked not having it. Foot retention is either nonexistent on a regular platform pedal, or extremely annoying on pinned platforms (sure, I get foot retention, but even in positions I don't want to be in).

The upsides of platform pedals aren't relevant to me - I bike long distances and have no interest in riding in regular shoes, not to mention the soles of those shoes are in no way conducive to staying on a platform.

The literal downside of being clipped in, that is, falling, is something I got over quickly. It doesn't hurt much to tip over at low speed.
surak is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-19, 03:08 PM
  #31  
Ironfish653
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Virginia Beach
Posts: 818

Bikes: 1997 Cannondale, 1976 Bridgestone, 1998 Softride

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 264 Post(s)
Originally Posted by .popcycle. View Post
What's striking to me is that 79pmooney posted about his experience riding with toe clips and straps yet you and paul rivers replied as if he was commenting about his experience with clipless pedals. It makes me wonder whether either of you understand the difference between the two (it's right there in the name...)

As far as clipless goes, I agree there is no "mental effort" required to use them once you've spent some time on them. Clipping in and out is as natural as braking, shifting, etc.
Back in post #16 , @79pmooney says he has straps, Look Deltas and SPDs. He also rides a lot of fixed-gear, so keeping your feet on the pedals is muy importante.
I've got Look (Keo's) and SPDs. I rode clips and straps until I got my first set of SPDs and never went back. I rode a lot of East Coast XC, and like the edge they give you in bike-handling over platforms, and the instant release you don't get with tight straps.

Paul Rivers believes that there is no measureable advantage to clipless, unless you're an elite racer, only hassles, and complains about them on every clipless pedal thread, based on a couple of minor, easily corrected 'issues' that were apparently the game-ender for him.
Ironfish653 is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service