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Why so many Trek Bikes out there?

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Why so many Trek Bikes out there?

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Old 02-06-19, 03:40 PM
  #101  
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Originally Posted by strangdang View Post

What you refer to as research and development I would call marketing and hype. Most of the actual advancements in tech comes from independent engineers and the Taiwanese factories themselves. The reason all the good carbon bikes are made there is the Taiwanese investment in technology and fabrication.
Letís give some credit where credit is do. While there may be some development done in Taiwan, Trek has done a lot of in-house research, design and even manufacturing on carbon fiber over the last 20+ years. Specialized does a lot of design work for their bikes in the US. Taiwan may have done a lot of investment in how to fabricate but they havenít done everything.
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Old 02-06-19, 03:46 PM
  #102  
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Originally Posted by willibrord View Post
Is Specialized American? I always thought they were Japanese/Taiwanese.
Yes. I believe, subject to correction, that Specialized is still 51% U.S. owned (Mike Sinyard?), with Merida (Taiwan) holding the other 49%. Corporate headquarters etc. are all still in California.

Merida makes many of Specialized's frames. The ownership also explains why we can't buy Merida-branded bikes in North America.
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Old 02-06-19, 03:48 PM
  #103  
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Originally Posted by willibrord View Post
Is Specialized American? I always thought they were Japanese/Taiwanese.
Specialized started as a US importer of tires and other parts. They started selling bicycles in 1981. They introduced the first production mountain bike in 1981 but I donít believe any of their bikes were ever produced in the US. Trek did manufacture them here for a very long time.
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Old 02-06-19, 03:56 PM
  #104  
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Originally Posted by BirdsBikeBinocs View Post
Why.???
In brief, suggest to read up on the LeMond vs. Trek / Armstrong era. You know about Armstrong.

Trek is a slime marketing outfit that continues to deceive the buyer. The only portion of US production is a sliver of CF bikes. Almost all of their products are outsourced or Asian made. But corporate leadership consistently whine about govt tax and how they're at a disadvantage. They sell out jobs to other countries anyways.

>>Trek consumed competitor bike companies and then shuttered them too! More jobs loss due their greed. Without getting all political, read up on some family members.<<

Racing and marketing~
Moving forward, the recent busted Cordosa. They (Trek) also have Contador who's been busted in the past and has cheat written on his forehead. Trek, after all the drama and deceit with Armstrong, will to this very day continues to approve and sponsor long known doped riders.

Win at all cost and just get that Trek brand on the podium. That's all that matters to Trek.

Hence, a very small percentage of Americans follow pro road cycling and as Trek obviously knows this. Joe Consumer who doesn't follow racing walks into a Trek store sees the 'winners choice' as a convincing sales pitch.

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Old 02-06-19, 03:56 PM
  #105  
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
I think what this thread needs is a photo of my anti-Trek. Thoughts?
Iím going to beat you to it and post my anti-Trek (and other large brands) that is not only anti-Trek but anti-Shimano and anti-import bikes:

My Dean. US made (actually Colorado made) with 14 US made components or accessories (4, including the frame, made in Colorado)

DSCN0934 by Stuart Black, on Flickr

And my Moots US made with 16 US made component or accessories (5, including the frame, made in Colorado). Although it isnít anti-Shimano in this picture, the Shimano crank has been replaced since the photo was taken.

IMG_3144 by Stuart Black, on Flickr
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Old 02-06-19, 07:08 PM
  #106  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post


Iím going to beat you to it and post my anti-Trek (and other large brands) that is not only anti-Trek but anti-Shimano and anti-import bikes:

My Dean. US made (actually Colorado made) with 14 US made components or accessories (4, including the frame, made in Colorado)

DSCN0934 by Stuart Black, on Flickr


What are the brands of derailleur's, shifters and brakes on this bike?
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Old 02-06-19, 09:22 PM
  #107  
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Who is the largest manufacturer of American made bicycles?
Is there a production bike made that is all American including components?
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Old 02-06-19, 09:59 PM
  #108  
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
What are the brands of derailleur's, shifters and brakes on this bike?
SRAM XO shifters and rear derailer. SRAM X9 front derailer. The brakes are TRP Spyke with Ashima rotors...203mm in the front and 180mm rear.
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Old 02-06-19, 10:07 PM
  #109  
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I don't understand the hullabaloo around "buying American" purely for the sake of buying American. KHS is 100% Taiwanese (started making bikes in Taiwan in 1974,) and they make excellent bikes. My wife's been riding a Flite500 for 7 years now.

But a lot of people shop by the label. Sister-in-law opted for a Trek Silque over a KHS Flite 780... and the KHS had Di2 and cost $1,300 less. Go figure.
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Old 02-06-19, 11:41 PM
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Originally Posted by willibrord View Post
Who is the largest manufacturer of American made bicycles?
Lynskey makes close to 10,000 frames a year, which is low for mass production but very high for hand-built frames. Given the nature of the U.S. economy and the extremely high cost of labor combined with very high costs for EPA compliance with industrial waste mitigation and disposal, I doubt there are many, if any, higher-volume manufacturers here in the states.

BCA puts out 10x that number of bikes per year, and they have an assembly plant in South Carolina, but the bikes they assemble are comprised of frames and components shipped from Asia.

So I guess it depends on what you define as "made."

Is there a production bike made that is all American including components?
I doubt it.
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Old 02-06-19, 11:48 PM
  #111  
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Originally Posted by cormacf View Post
I rarely see Trek at all, which is weird, because they have a store in Redmond, two towns over. I see a crapload of Specialized here on the East side of Puget sound. Mix of super-high-end carbon and a lot of really practical-for-the-area AWOL-style stuff. In Seattle proper, I see a lot of Surly/Soma/Salsa steel and a lot of vintage.
You rarely see Trek bikes? Geez.......they are all over the place. The BG and SRT are havens for Treks and many other bikes as well. I think I see at least a couple of Treks wherever I am riding whether on the eastside or Seattle. I used to see more Davidson's and Rodriguez bikes but not as many now.
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Old 02-06-19, 11:53 PM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
I don't understand the hullabaloo around "buying American" purely for the sake of buying American. KHS is 100% Taiwanese (started making bikes in Taiwan in 1974,) and they make excellent bikes. My wife's been riding a Flite500 for 7 years now.
Taiwanese products can be just as good as (and are in many cases better than) American-manufactured products. And are almost always less expensive, if a USA-made equivalent exists at all. I don't begrudge anyone for buying foreign-made stuff for that reason. A lot of products, parts and components simply aren't made by anyone in the USA anymore. Example: There are no USA-made stainless steel water bottles. None, zilch, nada.
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Old 02-07-19, 05:54 AM
  #113  
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Frame, hubs, headset, stem, post, cages and decals made domestically. Not sure about the glaze. Rode it home from the shop. That's the best I can do.




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Old 02-07-19, 07:26 AM
  #114  
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Originally Posted by crank_addict View Post
In brief, suggest to read up on the LeMond vs. Trek / Armstrong era. You know about Armstrong.

Trek is a slime marketing outfit that continues to deceive the buyer. The only portion of US production is a sliver of CF bikes. Almost all of their products are outsourced or Asian made. But corporate leadership consistently whine about govt tax and how they're at a disadvantage. They sell out jobs to other countries anyways.

>>Trek consumed competitor bike companies and then shuttered them too! More jobs loss due their greed. Without getting all political, read up on some family members.<<

Racing and marketing~
Moving forward, the recent busted Cordosa. They (Trek) also have Contador who's been busted in the past and has cheat written on his forehead. Trek, after all the drama and deceit with Armstrong, will to this very day continues to approve and sponsor long known doped riders.

Win at all cost and just get that Trek brand on the podium. That's all that matters to Trek.

Hence, a very small percentage of Americans follow pro road cycling and as Trek obviously knows this. Joe Consumer who doesn't follow racing walks into a Trek store sees the 'winners choice' as a convincing sales pitch.
^ Good summary. These reasons are why I won't ever own or ride a Trek* bike. I won't even so much as put a quick release skewer on a flip bike that has a "B" on the lever.

* I have no beef against early production steel Treks. My wife rides a 620 and it is really a fine bicycle.
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Old 02-07-19, 08:19 AM
  #115  
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Originally Posted by General Geoff View Post
Lynskey makes close to 10,000 frames a year, which is low for mass production but very high for hand-built frames. Given the nature of the U.S. economy and the extremely high cost of labor combined with very high costs for EPA compliance with industrial waste mitigation and disposal, I doubt there are many, if any, higher-volume manufacturers here in the states.

BCA puts out 10x that number of bikes per year, and they have an assembly plant in South Carolina, but the bikes they assemble are comprised of frames and components shipped from Asia.

So I guess it depends on what you define as "made."


I doubt it.
I was thinking from the ground up, tires, rims, hubs, frame, drivetrain, everything. Frame made from American carbon or alu, etc.
I guess not, there is no such thing. Too bad.
What needs to change for their to be a resurgence of American bicycle manufacturing? You mention EPA regs, which I hadn't thought of, but they are being modified or reduced.
Do the recent tariffs and import restrictions on Chinese goods effect made in Taiwan bikes? Does anybody know if the recent changes are encouraging an increase in American bicycle manufacturing?
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Old 02-07-19, 08:40 AM
  #116  
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Originally Posted by willibrord View Post
I was thinking from the ground up, tires, rims, hubs, frame, drivetrain, everything. Frame made from American carbon or alu, etc.
I guess not, there is no such thing. Too bad.
What needs to change for their to be a resurgence of American bicycle manufacturing? You mention EPA regs, which I hadn't thought of, but they are being modified or reduced.
Do the recent tariffs and import restrictions on Chinese goods effect made in Taiwan bikes? Does anybody know if the recent changes are encouraging an increase in American bicycle manufacturing?
Do all you want with tariffs and regulations, complete USA built bikes still won't ever happen due to labor costs. Few to none will buy a complete bike that cost many times more than a comparable Asian built machine. Americans want low cost products, but expect high wages, and this extends beyond bikes. Do the math. Exactly how can this ever work out?
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Old 02-07-19, 08:56 AM
  #117  
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
I don't understand the hullabaloo around "buying American" purely for the sake of buying American.
Part of the appeal is the hunt. Itís not all that easy to find American made parts and the end result is a bike that is unique. And some of those American parts are superior to their foreign counterparts.

Another part of the appeal is to have a bike that is unique. There are no other bikes on the planet like the two above. There are few that are even ďlikeĒ the bikes I posted above.
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Old 02-07-19, 09:15 AM
  #118  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post


Part of the appeal is the hunt. Itís not all that easy to find American made parts and the end result is a bike that is unique. And some of those American parts are superior to their foreign counterparts.

Another part of the appeal is to have a bike that is unique. There are no other bikes on the planet like the two above. There are few that are even ďlikeĒ the bikes I posted above.
So if five years from now everyone is riding American bikes you will go to great lengths to build an all Euro bike or something similar.
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Old 02-07-19, 09:34 AM
  #119  
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Originally Posted by willibrord View Post
I was thinking from the ground up, tires, rims, hubs, frame, drivetrain, everything. Frame made from American carbon or alu, etc.
I guess not, there is no such thing. Too bad.
What needs to change for their to be a resurgence of American bicycle manufacturing? You mention EPA regs, which I hadn't thought of, but they are being modified or reduced.
Do the recent tariffs and import restrictions on Chinese goods effect made in Taiwan bikes? Does anybody know if the recent changes are encouraging an increase in American bicycle manufacturing?
Mine are about a close as you can get. On both, the frame, rims, hubs, headset, seatpost, stem, handlebars, water bottle cages, stem caps, brake levers, bar ends, and possibly the forks (The forked are assembled in the US with mostly US parts) are US products. Even the handlebar end caps are American products. On the Moots, the brakes...Klemper front, Motolite rear...are US products. On the Dean, the seat clamp and headset spacers are US products.

It is possible to get front and rear derailers that are US made but they are extremely pricey and and a bit dated. Paul Components made both back in the 90s and they were extremely expensive then. You can occasionally find them now but the rear derailer alone goes for close to $500 on Fleabay. Iím not sure Iíd put a collectible like that on a bike.

There are old stock triple cranks available and maybe some new single speed cranks that are US products as well as bottom brackets. If you use flat pedals, those are available as well but not necessarily clipless. Wheelsmith makes spokes in the US. About the only thing I canít think of that isnít US made are shifters, cables, housing, and tires.

Hereís a list of US made products that I think is pretty comprehensive.

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Old 02-07-19, 09:36 AM
  #120  
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Originally Posted by willibrord View Post
So if five years from now everyone is riding American bikes you will go to great lengths to build an all Euro bike or something similar.
If you mean all-American, down to the tires, there's not a chance of it happening.
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Old 02-07-19, 09:48 AM
  #121  
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Just got this cool bike--it's the Trek Nigne.


Apologies to @indyfabz
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Old 02-07-19, 09:48 AM
  #122  
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Originally Posted by willibrord View Post
So if five years from now everyone is riding American bikes you will go to great lengths to build an all Euro bike or something similar.
Probably not since thatís not going to happen. Several of my bikes are US made but not all of them. None of my bikes are something youíll find on a showroom floor, however. Even my Specialized Epic is unique compared to stock. Mass produced, yes but still unique.
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Old 02-07-19, 11:25 AM
  #123  
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I thought part of being into bikes is getting what you want despite there being little difference in many of the brand names offered in the US now a days. I went with Trek because we have a solid support system around us and the ride was the most comfortable out of all others I tried. I could have picked up a Specialized for a bit cheaper and nicer color but I felt the Isospeed stuff actually made a difference having a bum disc in my neck, well, whether itís in my head or not, it seems to help on long rides compared to the others.

To say they're all the same is not 100% true but how much a mm there or a mm here really matters can be debated forever. But to me it seemed like the Isospeed wasnít just marketing, rather itís true engineering that has ďsomeĒ effect on my ride so it made sense to go that route. Or maybe itís me trying to justify my purchase but what does it matter if I was going to spend the money on a bike regardless? Buy what fits you, is comfortable and makes you want to ride more. If thatís a 10k bike with a shiny name, go for it!

Iíve never understood the whole mentality of not supporting brands that sponsor known dopers. Iím sure every brand has had a doper on their bikes in a world class race at some point so thatís just silly. People dope, always have and always will regardless of which bike they ride or who sponsors them. lol
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Old 02-07-19, 12:46 PM
  #124  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
Just got this cool bike--it's the Trek Nigne.


Apologies to @indyfabz
I got a similar bike from my favorite LBS in The Twilight Zone:

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Old 02-07-19, 01:14 PM
  #125  
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Originally Posted by luevelvet View Post
Iíve never understood the whole mentality of not supporting brands that sponsor known dopers. Iím sure every brand has had a doper on their bikes in a world class race at some point so thatís just silly. People dope, always have and always will regardless of which bike they ride or who sponsors them. lol
But you can make the effort to learn the facts and implications of actions taken by Armstrong and his cronies to destroy individuals personally and professionally, all in an effort to maintain a lie. The cycling media, Trek and Oakley were all complicit in this. It wasn't about the doping very much, it was about the carnage left in the wake of the denials, character assassinations, and cover-up.
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