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New and need advice

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Old 02-06-19, 10:29 AM
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Laxton19
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New and need advice

Hello all
I recently picked up cycling to lose weight and get in shape. Unfortunately my bicycle is in a 12 year old mountain bike that is ready to be replaced. I have since moved to Southwest Florida, and I'm looking for a bike to use down here. I would use it for exercise and recreation. This would be mainly on the road, not trails or sand. What I'm looking for is a type of bike that would be good for me to look into. Not necessarily a brand, but more a style or something along those lines.

Thank you!
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Old 02-06-19, 11:04 AM
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If your current bike is in good shape try getting some light tires for it. If you have typical heavy knobbies you will be surprised what a difference it will make. Your local bike shop (LBS) will have some hybrid tires that should work at far less cost than a new bike. Probably a new chain, brahe pads and a general tuneup would be a good idea. If you go to the bicycle mechanics section you can llearn how to most things for yourself.
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Old 02-06-19, 11:14 AM
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Maybe try a "fitness" bike like the Trek FX series, or a more comfort-oriented bike like the Specialized Roll.

There's too many variables possible to narrow down exactly what you're looking for until you actually try out some bikes.
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Old 02-06-19, 12:03 PM
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Having been through the same, and having to lose 20 kilos, 44 of your lbs, I chose to go with a carbon fibre road bike. Unfortunately, I was a few kilos too heavy to ride it, so started with a hybrid I already had. It was the south of France, but on the coast, so more about speed , and the mistral than climbing. Note that as important as the cycling is your diet - 30km into a 15 km head wind won't gain you much in fitness if you follow it with 3 croissants and a pain au chocolat

P.S 90 kg saw me on the road bike, which meant I could do the same distance slightly more quickly.
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Old 02-06-19, 02:52 PM
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Look into a flat bar road bike. Road bike because going faster is more fun, flat bar because it's likely more bang for your buck and because drops might be harder to get used to, at first.
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Old 02-06-19, 05:05 PM
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There are several good Giant Bicycle dealers in Southwest Florida. Go in and scope a few out. Tell them what you are up to and have them assess your needs and match them to a bike. If you have an athletic past a flat bar or drop bar road bike might be the ticket. If you have no background in exercise, then a comfort bike could fit the bill. Keep in mind the object of the game is to enjoy riding so that you do it consistently and desire to do it more and for longer periods of time. This means that you have to be comfortable when riding. Eventually you outgrow the bike and move into something more suited to a new level of fitness and goals.
FYI, I still ride my comfort bike on short errands or when I don't want to put all the gear on for a longer ride. That bike gets ridden several times a week!
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Old 02-06-19, 06:22 PM
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Any bike that you are comfortable on and that makes you smile enough that you really want to ride it! There is no point in getting an ostensibly terrific bike that you hate. It will just collect dust in the garage. Try out a few different types of bikes (hybrids, road bikes, gravel bikes, comfort bikes, etc) at a bike shop and see what speaks to you.
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Old 02-06-19, 06:33 PM
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You reallyneed to go to a bike shop and try some stuff.

definitely get a road bike, and don't listen to people who go on about weight limits unless you are over 350 pounds. I own a pair fo CF bikes and I weigh a Lot ... and the bikes are fine. I have a couple bikes with relatively low-spoke-count wheels, and while I have broken a couple spokes, that is a couple spokes in a bout 9,000 miles of riding. (Not that I would Recommend low-spoke-count wheels ... just saying, the "Maximum Load" labels are very conservative.)

You will want a road bike ... frame material is irrelevant.. Your choices are three--race geometry or endurance geometry with drop bars, and any flat-bar road bike.

Normally I'd suggest a Fuji for value, but since the company's future is unknown ... I would suggest Giant as the next best "bang-for-the-buck" brand. (I know I am missing some but others will correct me, i am sure. )

I would suggest a Giant Fastroad or Contend ... with aluminum frame. The reason being, the Contend after the first, cheapest model, has (or used to have---again, more knowledgeable people will set me straight) the Allux 2 or whatever frame, a really nice frame.

An entry-level carbon frame might mean you are getting the worst of all worlds---an unresponsive, overweight, yet potentially breakable frame (though ti takes quite a lot to break a CF frame, a sharp shock Might do it.) A Good aluminum frame with a CF fork can be responsive and still comfortable can weigh about the same as the cheap[, CF frame, and if you crash hard you won't have to worry about it.

The Contend has drop bars and "Endurance" geometry, which means it is easier to set up the bike to sit more upright---I have a huge and weak stomach, and a weak lower back, and messed-up shoulders (bike wrecks) so I cannot ride all laid-out and low like Tour de France racers. A more upright posture makes longer rides a Lot more comfortable. (https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/co...sl-2-disc-2018)

The Fastroad has a flat bar, which theoretically won't get you any more upright than the tops on a drop bar, but will be a bit wider, and will seem more "normal" coming from a mountain bike---Perhaps. You really need to ride some different bikes to see what makes You comfortable. (https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/fastroad-sl-1)

There are plenty of Contend mocelds, and a few Fastroads. Check them all out and see what you think.

Also ... look at whatever brands are around. Giant usually sells bikes for a tiny bit less than some of the competition, but whatever. Also, a bike which is two or three years old (if it has been sitting in a shop) can often be had for a lot less ... and honestly, from year to year the biggest changes tend to be the paint schemes and decals.

In general--- I would look for Sora 2400, Tiagra 4700, or 105 5800 or 7000 drive trains. The quality is high enough that you could buy a bike today as a relative beginner and still have all the drive train you need ten years from now.

Shop around, come back and ask more questions. I love pretending I know stuff.
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Old 02-06-19, 06:45 PM
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Any endurance road bike with decent components will do. I consider Shimano 105 decent, Ultegra really nice, DuraAce excellent. Tiagra would be acceptable on a budget. If you have the choice between C.F. with Sora and aluminum with 105, go aluminum.

Endurance road will be slightly more compliant than a racing road bike, and slightly more relaxed (comfortable) geometry.

Flat bar road bikes are ok too, unless you find yourself wishing for a more aerodynamic position on the bike. Riding on the hoods is more aero than on a flat bar. But a flat bar may feel more nimble at first, and less stretched out.
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Old 02-10-19, 03:19 PM
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My advice is to ride the bike you have for awhile and explore the area where you live. As you do that, you will find routes that you like to ride as well as discover the characteristics you like about your present bike and the things that you hate. There really isn't a short cut for that process.because anybody you ask isn't you and has their own set of likes and prejudices.
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Old 02-11-19, 10:31 AM
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IMHO... Keep the bike that you have and put some Vitoria Mezcal or WTB Nano tires on it. I ride Mezcals on my bikepacking bike which takes me on road, gravel, dirt, etc... They have good rolling resistance. that will give you a lot of options.
Get your cardio built up and legs stronger and then make the plunge into something new.
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Old 02-13-19, 11:11 AM
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I got into bikes to lose weight too. If you are trying to lose weight, it means you haven't been exercising. Which means an aggressive aero or race/road bike probably will give you lots of pain and you will end up not wanting to ride it. I had that experience and switched to a hybrid bike with a more relaxed geometry. I have a belly I want to lose so being able to sit up upright is very important for me. On aggressive bikes, when you sit up right, you'll find it difficult to reach the brakes for emergencies. Endurance bikes and commuter hybrids are fast enough for most people. It can keep up with road bikes unless they are deliberately going fast or racing.

As for carbon or aluminum, how much do you want to spend? Then I found you have to research a bit on saddles. Maybe spend a little more money on the right saddles. Without comfort, you wouldn't want to exercise at all. Many people, when not spending a lot of money on bikes will tell themselves, "Whatever, I'll get this, this is pretty nice". I would suggest buying a bike you absolutely LOVE. Not just a bike you think, "It's okay". A bike that would be calling you to ride it. A bike that you can't wait for the next day to get on it. A bike that makes you register to a forum like this to learn more about bikes!

Otherwise just stick with your old bike till you know what you want.
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Old 02-13-19, 11:24 AM
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Florida ?

Originally Posted by Laxton19 View Post
Hello all
I recently picked up cycling to lose weight and get in shape. Unfortunately my bicycle is in a 12 year old mountain bike that is ready to be replaced. I have since moved to Southwest Florida, and I'm looking for a bike to use down here. I would use it for exercise and recreation. This would be mainly on the road, not trails or sand. What I'm looking for is a type of bike that would be good for me to look into. Not necessarily a brand, but more a style or something along those lines.

Thank you!
Beach Cruiser Painted : Teal and Pink ....
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Old 02-13-19, 11:34 AM
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Why does your bike need to be replaced? I also started cycling to get in shape but I had a mountain bike that was more than 20 years old and hadn't been used in maybe 10 years. Took me a few hours of work and less than 50 dollars in tires, tubes, and a shifter to get it in good enough shape to ride but its fine. After using it for about a year, I picked up a used road bike but still ride the old beast on early morning (4AM) rides before work 2-3 times a week. Later I added fenders to it so I don't worry about when the roads are wet.

It's about 37 pounds as ridden but if you're cycling for exercise, who cares? Of course I can go farther and faster on the road bike (which I do on the weekends) but an hour on this bike is as good a workout as an hour on the road bike, maybe better.

Unless your current bike is badly rusted or completely trashed, I'd look at fixing it up before buying something new. If you use it and enjoy it, you'll have a better idea of what you want to get when it's time to get another one.
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Old 02-13-19, 11:38 AM
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Post number 2 was the most helpful. A set of cheap tires for $50, a few $5 cables, a quarter turn or so on a barrel adjuster. Maybe a $15 chain. Will be a HUGE improvement. It might even render the search for a new bike redundant.

To carry it further, a handlebar swap could be done for $30...Do that & you'll basically have a new bike.

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Old 02-13-19, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by base2 View Post
Post number 2 was the most helpful. .
I would say it is only marginally helpful.

The OP specifies that the old bike is ready for retirement. We have no idea how trashed it might be, or how much it might take to get it into riding condition.

Further, the OP specifically states that s/he wants a New bike.

I am sure we all understand this. A new bike brings its own excitement. Plus, a new bike will work better in every way. Twelve-year-old components? And we can safely assume this was not a top-orf-the-line MTB to begin with---the poster would not be here asking for basic advice if s/he had a long history of cycling, and would not likely have bought a really good MTB 12 years ago if s/he was not much riding.

I wouldn't object to mentioning the option of smooth tires ... but a heavy old MTB with tired parts might take a buttload of reworking to be fun to ride---how is the headset, the BB, the wheel bearings? Cables are cheap----does the OP have the skill and the tools to replace them and then to adjust the brakes and derailleurs? if not, that might be $100 at a shop. A new chain might be $15 to $50 .... does the OP have the requisite tools to replace and size a chain?

New tires alone could cost $50 .... or twice that.

Stripping down the whole bike to check the bearings .... how much to get the wheels trued and tightened? And ... are we talking about a beat-up Walmart bike or a low-cost bike from a major manufacturer? How many of the parts could be replaced if needed, and at what cost?

While suggesting that the OP might be able to grease the chain and slap some slicks on the old ride ... we all know that would be a stop-gap at best, and a huge waste of time, money, and hope at worst.

The OP Asks for advice on getting a new bike. Suggesting s/he should not .... hmmmm.

I'd say that while it might be useful to suggest swapping the tires and lubing the chain ... sinking money into a bike the OP almost certainly will not want in a few months (as s/he Already does not want to ride it any more) sounds like a bad idea. it might cost a couple hundred to get the old bike really rideable---which is money better applied to a new bike, IMO and according to what the OP wants.

Telling the OP to invest in tools and parts, and then to spend time learning to rebuild bikes ... the OP wants to Ride, not to wrench. I would certainly suggest that all people who ride frequently get at least basic tools and learn basic techniques over time---changing a chain, adjusting brakes, indexing derailleurs ... maybe doing a quick true on a wheel if it isn't bad. Some riders never do ... so what?

Most people start by Riding, not wrenching. if they don't ride they have no need for wrenching ability. And the OP wants to ride for fun and health and fitness---not spend hours watching videos and dollars buying tools and then trying to refit a bike which for all we know has terminal damage.

Post #2 presents an option, which is good. it is not the best option unless all the conditions of the post (Specifically, "If your current bike is in good shape") of the post are met. But the OP says specifically that "my bicycle is in a 12 year old mountain bike that is ready to be replaced."

No matter. Apparently the OP has not been back since first posting anyway.
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Old 02-13-19, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Laxton19 View Post
Hello all
I recently picked up cycling to lose weight and get in shape. Unfortunately my bicycle is in a 12 year old mountain bike that is ready to be replaced. I have since moved to Southwest Florida, and I'm looking for a bike to use down here. I would use it for exercise and recreation. This would be mainly on the road, not trails or sand. What I'm looking for is a type of bike that would be good for me to look into. Not necessarily a brand, but more a style or something along those lines.

Thank you!
To enjoy the ride, find something with a comfortable riding position for you. Test ride. Test ride for more than a few minutes. Find something you enjoy riding. If you have more fun, you'll get out riding more.
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Old 02-13-19, 01:02 PM
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Also, do some research on high intensity intervals or HIIT. These are superior approaches to losing weight and getting fit.
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Old 02-13-19, 01:07 PM
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Stationary bikes set up with HIIT programs, and good software and screens, and heart rate monitors can help a lot. If it's too hot or rainy, or for some other reason unappealing to get outside, or if there are certain time constraints, stationary bikes can offer more opportunities to get a workout.

If you can afford both, that's always an option. They aren't necessarily mutually exclusive. And Craigslist has them both.
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Old 02-13-19, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
I would say it is only marginally helpful.
<snip>
The OP specifies that the old bike is ready for retirement. We have no idea how trashed it might be, or how much it might take to get it into riding condition.
<snip>
No matter. Apparently the OP has not been back since first posting anyway.
I don't disagree with any of the points you bring up. Needing a new bike is subjective claim at best. Bikes get tossed to the curb all the time for rusted cables or flat tires.

Further with no mention of make or model of bike, we have no way of knowing what is worth saving & what isn't. What we can infer, however, is that the OP isn't really invested in cycling & even less so in the care of his bike. An interest in cycling would likely include the performance of basic maintenance, a cursery knowledge of what the field has to offer, and what his needs actually are. I guess he want a JRA bike?

To that end, for the dis-interested owner, a set of better tires & basic maintenance items is solid advice. He can do what he wants with it. Everything else just parts him from his money.

I wanna new bike too. I've got 12. I don't know what my needs are. What should I get?
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Old 02-13-19, 01:38 PM
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Buy a bike you are comfortable on while riding. I'd recommend not spending a lot of money until you prove to yourself that you will faithfully ride it multiple times per week on a regular basis. So in that respect, maybe you should take a look at your current bike and see what it needs to get it ride-able. Plenty of people in Florida ride mountain bikes regularly on paved roads and trails.

Weight loss doesn't always come easy using a bike either. Even if you don't loose weight while using the bike, you likely should be healthier from the exercise.
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Old 02-14-19, 12:41 AM
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Like others have suggested. Make the bike you already have road worthy first and see how serious you are about cycling. Gauge your interest in cycling and demo various bikes at your local cycling stores. You’ll know when you’ve found the right bike st the right price enjoy!
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Old 02-14-19, 04:01 AM
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One word about weight loss and cycling----there is no definitive relationship between them.

I am sure you have heard the phrase "You can't outrun a bad diet," meaning that no amount of jogging can burn enough calories to make up for overeating. This is not absolutely true---if you have the base fitness to burn five thousand calories a day, and the time to exercise that much, you will probably not have time to eat enough to stay heavy. But realistically, an hour of brisk cycling might burn a small sandwich or a slice of pizza.

I hope I am not coming across as pedantic here, but I have been everywhere along the spectrum from single-digit body-fat to pure body fat (well, pretty near.) In most cases, you cannot burn enough calories that you cannot still overeat.

Cycling can help reduce cravings and provide some satisfaction. An hour of brisk cycling can raise your base metabolism for a few hours. And I find I can sometimes fight the urge to eat by telling myself I don't want to feel weighed down when I get on the bike in a few hours.

Plus, cycling gets me away from the refrigerator, so I cannot eat out of boredom or depression or habit.

But ... I can ride for 90 minutes, come home, shower, and eat half a pizza and a pound of yogurt and I have pretty much erased any weight-loss benefit from cycling that day.

I say this not to discourage but to ward off discouragement---I don't wan to you to stop cycling because you don't lose weight. Cycling is part of a health program, not the whole deal.

Likely you already know all this, as it is not some hidden knowledge. Sorry if I am belaboring the obvious.

Hope you get exactly the results you are supposed to get.
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Old 02-14-19, 04:43 AM
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Sorry, Maelochs, but why do you eat so much after a ride, especially such high fat food? While I understand you are using this as an example and incentive, which is not to change diet, you've just effectively doubled the difficulty in losing weight if that is what your regular diet includes, unless that is all you eat for the day.

You need to watch calories, else you've zero chance of losing weight, and usually packaged food has the amount marked. In the end, you'll soon work out that, as long as you keep your daily calorie intake below what you burn, and Strava is a magic way of logging that, you are going to lose weight. You'll also find out that a glass of wine or beer is still on the cards, as long as you have one glass, or two and drop the yoghurt.

I'd take issue with you on diet, too. You'll soon find that fruit is excellent for health on any diet, but, like any other food, if you eat a bunch of bananas you'll not be able to have shepherd's pie for lunch. The good news is that you'll be surprised how quickly you get used to it, can calculate calories at a glance, and how much money you save. The big mistake is to think you can eat well for 5 days then have a blow out on the weekend, because that becomes the norm. You'd be far better off getting used to the amount of calories you can eat in a day, and carry on accordingly. You'll also find the more sensitive of you friends won't make comments when you go to restaurants and forego desert, or eat salads with lots of flavour but little dressing etc.

I had a good incentive, apart from hopefully a longer life, because, as noted before, the road bike I bought was expensive, and it was only afterwards when I read the manual I realised I was 10 kg over the maximum recommended weight. So, over a glorious spring, summer and autumn in the Southern of France I cycled, walked the dog, ate a healthy amount each day plus got a decent sun tan. Now, in the North, I've put on 3 kgs, because I'm not keen on cycling in the cold, and the diet is different here, plus I got sick and couldn't do a lot of exercise, except with the jaws.

There is no magic to losing weight. It is changing diet, watching calories, weighing yourself every day, exercise, having supportive friends. It is also not eating pizza, cheese*, products high in fat and sugar. The good thing is you do get used to it reasonably quickly, and, if you like shopping for clothes, you're going to have to change your wardrobe at the end

*I used to adore cheese. Now, living in the country that produces the most different varieties, and arguably the best, I don't even miss it.
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Old 02-14-19, 06:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Laxton19 View Post
Hello all
I recently picked up cycling to lose weight and get in shape. Unfortunately my bicycle is in a 12 year old mountain bike that is ready to be replaced. I have since moved to Southwest Florida, and I'm looking for a bike to use down here. I would use it for exercise and recreation. This would be mainly on the road, not trails or sand. What I'm looking for is a type of bike that would be good for me to look into. Not necessarily a brand, but more a style or something along those lines.

Thank you!
get an azub max recumbent the most comfy and aero bike u can get....don't just ride enjoy ur rides on a recumbent
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