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Another bike shop closing

Old 03-05-19, 09:47 PM
  #26  
mstateglfr 
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Des Moines area shops seem fine overall.
there have been a couple that opened in a last few years and are still around, and the larger well established shops are still here too.

one major shop expanded to a second store as winter started.
and another major store recently moved into a renovated grocery store giving them more space and a better location.

oh, and another established store was bought by Erick's last year. Same people, mostly same products. So Erick's obviously saw value in the company.
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Old 03-06-19, 09:48 AM
  #27  
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I wonder if it is a city v. suburbs/small town thing. Sounds like city shops seem to be doing better. Having colleges nearby probably helps that, bringing in more young people who find bikes not just recreational, but economical transportation, with minimal parking considerations.
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Old 03-06-19, 09:57 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by NJgreyhead View Post
I wonder if it is a city v. suburbs/small town thing. Sounds like city shops seem to be doing better. Having colleges nearby probably helps that, bringing in more young people who find bikes not just recreational, but economical transportation, with minimal parking considerations.
Yes. Having students around can help. A lot of Temple U. Students now live in the Spring Garden area of the city, where Philly Bikesmith is located. I have spent time hanging out there waiting for repairs and have seen a lot of student-looking people stop in for service and accessories. They usually have at least 3 mechanics working at any given moment, and they almost always seem busy.

But again...D&Q's closing does not appear to be financially related. As I noted above, Joe V. ordered me a bike back in '98 or '99. And I knew him from being on the City to Shore planning committee in the mid 90s. He was no spring chicken back then.
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Old 03-06-19, 11:15 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
But again...D&Q's closing does not appear to be financially related. As I noted above, Joe V. ordered me a bike back in '98 or '99. And I knew him from being on the City to Shore planning committee in the mid 90s. He was no spring chicken back then.
The explanation given in the newspaper just strikes me as a little, well, incomplete. No mention of an attempt to sell the business, which had to have been considered.
Perhaps they own the real estate (a prime, upscale location), and found no prospective buyers could make the numbers work for the bike/ski business plus the real estate in a tough retail climate, so they are just figuring on selling the property?
I've heard they are good people, always willing to help out with various causes. I wish them well.
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Old 03-06-19, 11:37 AM
  #30  
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I am disappointed by LBS selection. But good news is a new REI near me and a new Dicks. They seem to be better than LBS, imo.

I feel big box store has better service and parts and tools selection. And I always feel more comfortable just browsing at BBS...but at LBS, I don't feel like I'm welcome unless I have something to buy.

I forgot there's also a Sun and Skis...which have a good bike depart too.

I think small LBS will mostly go extinct. But good news is big box store has everything I need...and they are here to stay.

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Old 03-06-19, 07:45 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by NJgreyhead View Post
I wonder if it is a city v. suburbs/small town thing. Sounds like city shops seem to be doing better. Having colleges nearby probably helps that, bringing in more young people who find bikes not just recreational, but economical transportation, with minimal parking considerations.
There is a growing economic gap between city and country. Also, in my state, the rural roads are crumbling.
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Old 03-06-19, 09:42 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
There is a growing economic gap between city and country. Also, in my state, the rural roads are crumbling.
It's been growing for years. It seems counter-intuitive but higher taxes to fund investment in reliable infrastructure attracts jobs. Jobs attract skilled workers & skilled workers can command an income such that some is disposable enough to allow other industries to thrive. Retail bike shops for example. The high tax places are where industry tends to thrive because it's a reliable place to do business & easy to make long term predictable plans to stay in business. The actual taxes paid is always lower than the cost of not being in business at all. There is a reason all the industry is in Central/Southern California, Eastern New York, Western Washington, Dallas-Fort WorthTexas...Reliable infrastructure, cheap electricity, tax-payer owned ports both air & sea & tax payer owned roads in good repair to get there.

As a person who lives in a "high-tax" half of a donor state, I'm actually a bit irritated that my taxes subsidize the anti-tax rural areas of my own state, let alone are given to the Federal Government to distribute to & carry states that won't invest in them selves.

It's math on a ledger. Donor states vs taker states. I'm not P&R-ing this, it's an acknowledgement that you are indeed correct. The roads are crumbling & the funds are not available to repair them because the people that use them don't think they are important enough to pay for. When they realize that a 40 ton semi-truck can't go over a 19 ton bridge is the reason that widget manufacturer decided not to open a factory in their town, maybe they'll decide to believe in themselves and make (rural town X) great again. Until then, taxes are how the citizens of donor states show their patriotism to America the whole...but TBH it's hard carrying rural America, when Rural America hates you for being dynamic, multi-cultural, secular, & successful. Especially when their citizens are absolutely blind to how their state budgets are built on the assumption of federal charity from donor states to bridge the gap.

Our roads could be better too.

Make California Affordable Again.

Last edited by base2; 03-06-19 at 09:46 PM.
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Old 03-07-19, 12:30 AM
  #33  
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The LBS I used, in a village a few miles away, closed at the end of last year. The owner wanted to retire and had had the business for sale for over a year but couldn't find a buyer.

That's one of the reasons why the smaller shops are closing - finding a buyer who's got the knowledge of bikes plus the finance to buy a business which may not be highly profitable is very difficult.

I've found a very small shop in my home town now, very much a one man band, but the owner has got the combination of honesty, knowledge, and friendly service that makes me confident in his work and happy to support his business.
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Old 03-09-19, 06:20 PM
  #34  
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If you compare to general trends in small retail, lbs are clearly doing comparatively well.

Right now, I am seeing the rapid disappearance of mattress stores.
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Old 03-11-19, 07:13 AM
  #35  
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It's not just shops closing. Bicycle sales in the U.S. have declined annually for 17 straight years (based total sales from all sources; LBS, Online, Dept/Discount store, etc.). 2018 actually saw a slight revenue increase of 2% though unit sales were down 9%.

More: https://streets.mn/2015/07/29/why-ar...the-14th-year/

OTOH, sales and service revenue have been steady or increasing for European countries over this period (and prior). European bike shops also get more revenue per bike because people are more willing to invest in a bike that they will use frequently for transportation and they also do about 3x the service revenue (relative to bicycle sales) of U.S. shops.
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Old 03-11-19, 12:42 PM
  #36  
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A shop I worked in just sold last year. It has been around since the mid 70's and is a successful shop. The owner looked for a buyer for at least 5 years and only had 2 people take a look at it. Finally sold it to an employee after a year of negotiations. Bike shops are not high margin businesses and it shows when it comes to selling it.
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Old 03-12-19, 07:54 AM
  #37  
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I read on a blog I subscribe to that there are more than 5,300 brick-and-mortar stores slated to close this year in a variety of industries. The article listed Performance Bike as planning to close 102 locations. I didn't know they had that many. Wow.
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Old 03-12-19, 10:11 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by CrankyOne View Post
It's not just shops closing. Bicycle sales in the U.S. have declined annually for 17 straight years (based total sales from all sources; LBS, Online, Dept/Discount store, etc.). 2018 actually saw a slight revenue increase of 2% though unit sales were down 9%.

More: https://streets.mn/2015/07/29/why-ar...the-14th-year/

OTOH, sales and service revenue have been steady or increasing for European countries over this period (and prior). European bike shops also get more revenue per bike because people are more willing to invest in a bike that they will use frequently for transportation and they also do about 3x the service revenue (relative to bicycle sales) of U.S. shops.

Because the bike industry is trying to sell N+1 and not net new riders ......
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Old 03-12-19, 10:34 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
There is a growing economic gap between city and country. Also, in my state, the rural roads are crumbling.
The closing shop that was the original subject of this thread is not a country store. Far from it. It's in Cherry Hill, NJ. Total commercial sprawl and home to what is considered to be the oldest what we now call a "mall" in the U.S.
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