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Another road bike with Sypre discs

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Another road bike with Sypre discs

Old 03-04-19, 07:04 PM
  #1  
TiHabanero
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Another road bike with Sypre discs

Set up another road bike this past Saturday with Spyre discs and 105 brifters. Even without compressionless housing they work wonderfully well. Makes me think that they were designed with 105 in mind.
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Old 03-04-19, 07:25 PM
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I've been pretty happy with mine for a couple of years now. I have them on the front of both of my lowracers.


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Old 03-04-19, 10:49 PM
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I've been very happy with the TRP Spyres on my Culprit Croz Blade. They came as OEM on the bike which I've had since new in 2013. No issues, they work great with Ultegra Di2 levers too.

Not the "brake" side, but they're there.
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Old 03-05-19, 12:20 AM
  #4  
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Not impressive braking, but reliable and they stay adjusted. I like mine.
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Old 03-05-19, 02:32 AM
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Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
Set up another road bike this past Saturday with Spyre discs and 105 brifters. Even without compressionless housing they work wonderfully well. Makes me think that they were designed with 105 in mind.
It seems like mechanical discs aren't even being spec'ed anymore on road bikes. How do these compare with entry or mid level hydraulics?
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Old 03-05-19, 10:05 AM
  #6  
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I run Spykes on our mountain tandem. They work great.
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Old 03-05-19, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by radroad View Post
It seems like mechanical discs aren't even being spec'ed anymore on road bikes. How do these compare with entry or mid level hydraulics?
The difference between mechanical and hydro is definitely noticeable (to me anyway) but the mechanical are definitely a bit more responsive and better than rim brakes (again to me anyway).
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Old 03-05-19, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Not impressive braking, but reliable and they stay adjusted. I like mine.
+1. I wouldn't go out of my way to buy them again, but they stop the bike as well (or crappily, depending on your glass of water) as pretty much every other type of brakes I have that aren't hydro discs.
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Old 03-05-19, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by luevelvet View Post
The difference between mechanical and hydro is definitely noticeable (to me anyway) but the mechanical are definitely a bit more responsive and better than rim brakes (again to me anyway).
I wonder if the latest round of DA/Ultegra/105 dual pivots have closed the gap some. I have ridden mechanical discs on road and mtb's and am usually disappointed. I have ridden bikes with hydraulics and was very pleased with higher end xt but found slx and deore to be merely good or competent.

I find v brakes to be very powerful but with less power progressively after the strong initial bite.
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Old 03-05-19, 04:41 PM
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When I compare the Spyre disc brakes to the hydro disc brakes I had previously, the hydro discs really grab hard and require less hand effort to grab. The Spyre discs grab nicely, but not hard like hydro brakes, they slow the bike down equally well, but require more hand effort than the hydro brake to get the same result.
Modulation is much the same, again hand effort is vastly different between them. When it comes to maintenance the hydro discs should be flushed annually. Spyres are simply maintaining cable slack.

I much prefer the Spyre brakes and recommend them to those that want a low maintenance disc system. I do not like the big brake lever reservoir of the hydro systems as they look bad and don't fit my hands as well. If one must have high powered braking, the hydro brakes are the way to go. If quality braking is desired in rain or shine, then the Spyre brakes are the ticket. They feel much like XT parallelogram V-Brakes with better modulation.
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Old 03-05-19, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
+1. I wouldn't go out of my way to buy them again, but they stop the bike as well (or crappily, depending on your glass of water) as pretty much every other type of brakes I have that aren't hydro discs.
Thats pretty much the consensus. Hardly thread worthy.
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Old 03-06-19, 08:14 AM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by radroad View Post
I wonder if the latest round of DA/Ultegra/105 dual pivots have closed the gap some. I have ridden mechanical discs on road and mtb's and am usually disappointed. I have ridden bikes with hydraulics and was very pleased with higher end xt but found slx and deore to be merely good or competent.

I find v brakes to be very powerful but with less power progressively after the strong initial bite.
I have the Spyre mechanical disc brakes on my Fuji Jari gravel bike and the latest 105 Hydro discs on my Domane and I definitely feel a big difference. When I first got the Fuji I thought the brakes were great but then I tried the Trek with Hydro disc and I was amazed how much better they were. My wife has the dual pivot 5800 rim brakes on her 2018 Domane and she claims she has more control on her mechanical Spyre discs than the rim brakes but hasn't complained other than noticing less stopping power. We don't ride faster than 25mph at the moment so I'm not sure if she'll notice a bigger difference at higher speeds and we don't have hills to ascend down (central FL) so we're not the best test subjects for such scenarios.
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Old 03-06-19, 01:28 PM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by radroad View Post
I wonder if the latest round of DA/Ultegra/105 dual pivots have closed the gap some.
I think my Ultegra rim brakes stop me better than the Spyres---but that is on a bike which weighs ten pounds less. The 105s, about on par? I haven't used a tape measure. I also haven't played with pad compounds.
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Old 03-06-19, 03:17 PM
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Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
When I compare the Spyre disc brakes to the hydro disc brakes I had previously, the hydro discs really grab hard and require less hand effort to grab. The Spyre discs grab nicely, but not hard like hydro brakes, they slow the bike down equally well, but require more hand effort than the hydro brake to get the same result.
Modulation is much the same, again hand effort is vastly different between them. When it comes to maintenance the hydro discs should be flushed annually. Spyres are simply maintaining cable slack.

I much prefer the Spyre brakes and recommend them to those that want a low maintenance disc system. I do not like the big brake lever reservoir of the hydro systems as they look bad and don't fit my hands as well. If one must have high powered braking, the hydro brakes are the way to go. If quality braking is desired in rain or shine, then the Spyre brakes are the ticket. They feel much like XT parallelogram V-Brakes with better modulation.
This just tells me that you are just used to the way braking with caliper brakes/mechanical discs are. Once you use hydro your adapt to the modulation quickly and it becomes even easier to feather. I've made the progression of ~10 years from BB7/BB5 to spyres to HY/RDs to now shimano/sram hydro. The majority of the time from the hoods or the drops I can use one finger to come to a stop. Can't say the same for any of my mechanical disc brake bikes ever
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Old 03-06-19, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by redlude97 View Post
The majority of the time from the hoods or the drops I can use one finger to come to a stop.
This was one of the first things I had to learn when i started MTB---braking was two fingers at most. Roadies will soon realize how good it feels to ride with one finger, not four, covering the brake lever, and to hold firmly to the bars while braking as hard as needed with one finger.
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Old 03-06-19, 03:53 PM
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Bought my first bike with disc last year, came with Spyre's. No issues, but I didn't know they needed to be , bedded-in , at first. Now they work great.KB.
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Old 03-06-19, 05:12 PM
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Fortunately for me I don't need or desire one finger braking. Spyre's work really well for my applications. Used hydro brakes for 3 years on the mountain bike and didn't figure they helped more than the rim brakes used before that. Of course I don't ride beyond my ability, either.
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Old 03-06-19, 05:20 PM
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Looks like a saw blade that is going to slice your artery open when you crash.
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Old 03-07-19, 02:24 AM
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I'm sure they're fine. It's a solid, budget, low level disc brake that works well enough just like most other brakes on the market. My standard v-brakes have far more power than I absolutely need. My mini v-brakes have good stopping power and lock up a little too easily during the occasional panic stop. Old school rx100 and 105 dual pivots were very good two (edit: THREE) decades ago. Discs are unnecessary for at least 90% of road riders.


The dedicated, higher mileage, big ticket bike riders on the forum aren't representative of cyclists on the whole either here in the US or anywhere else in the world. Worldwide, 95-99% of riders are well served by standard brakes. On the other hand, anyone who rides frequently in rainy and/or muddy conditions are well served by disc brakes.


As always be aware of the tradeoffs: additional weight, aerodynamics penalty, heavier frame and fork required in addition to components. An additional possibility of being cut (chainrings and discs), rotors can overheat and injure if you touch them accidentally, and if you squeeze too hard (far easier with discs esp. hydraulic), you may be taking a different type of ride. An aerial ride over your bars that is.


For road bikes, discs are overkill. You don't need a forklift to eat a caesar's salad. Choose the right tool for the job.

Last edited by radroad; 03-07-19 at 03:55 PM.
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Old 03-08-19, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by radroad View Post
I'm sure they're fine. It's a solid, budget, low level disc brake that works well enough just like most other brakes on the market. My standard v-brakes have far more power than I absolutely need. My mini v-brakes have good stopping power and lock up a little too easily during the occasional panic stop. Old school rx100 and 105 dual pivots were very good two (edit: THREE) decades ago. Discs are unnecessary for at least 90% of road riders.


The dedicated, higher mileage, big ticket bike riders on the forum aren't representative of cyclists on the whole either here in the US or anywhere else in the world. Worldwide, 95-99% of riders are well served by standard brakes. On the other hand, anyone who rides frequently in rainy and/or muddy conditions are well served by disc brakes.


As always be aware of the tradeoffs: additional weight, aerodynamics penalty, heavier frame and fork required in addition to components. An additional possibility of being cut (chainrings and discs), rotors can overheat and injure if you touch them accidentally, and if you squeeze too hard (far easier with discs esp. hydraulic), you may be taking a different type of ride. An aerial ride over your bars that is.


For road bikes, discs are overkill. You don't need a forklift to eat a caesar's salad. Choose the right tool for the job.
Based on this logic we'd all be riding Pennyfarthing highwheelers, or Sears balloon tire beach cruisers. Beware of cycling overkill! 😱
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Old 03-08-19, 06:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Slightspeed View Post
Based on this logic we'd all be riding Pennyfarthing highwheelers, or Sears balloon tire beach cruisers. Beware of cycling overkill! 😱
Yet you hate e-bikes.
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Old 03-09-19, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by TiHabanero View Post
Set up another road bike this past Saturday with Spyre discs and 105 brifters. Even without compressionless housing they work wonderfully well. Makes me think that they were designed with 105 in mind.

Maybe shimano cable pull*, in general?... you can gather data and post you findings on differences of 105 and the pricier 2

and the lesser , + while you are at it , test SRAM too . do they have a different MA /Cable pull or match... ?


As I understand ,, Campagnolo has a greater MA, so pulls less ..
Bodges used in Hy Rd, show shortening the actuating arm to match..


I note: Pauls 'Clamper', offers 3 actuating arm lengths , one made for using Campag, the Shortest ...







...

Last edited by fietsbob; 03-09-19 at 09:55 AM.
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Old 03-09-19, 02:14 PM
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All the hydros have tiny little seals under high pressure so you can be certain they will fail, and this is the reason why Bikecorp™and its shills push them.
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Old 03-09-19, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by radroad View Post
It seems like mechanical discs aren't even being spec'ed anymore on road bikes. How do these compare with entry or mid level hydraulics?
There is slight difference in braking from manufacturer to manufacturer but there is no such thing as "entry level hydraulic disk brakes". They are good for one thing on road bikes - now that carbon wheels are so common, disk brakes extend that life of a carbon rim by wearing out the disk and pads. Unlike so many claims I have never seen any "improved modulation" from rim brakes and it is a HELL of a lot easier to lock disk brakes than rim brakes.
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Old 03-09-19, 05:33 PM
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Let's just say a road bike entry price tier for one with hydro brifters is going to start off significantly higher
than you a bargain seeker may be willing to pay..

might as well go for electronic shifting too If you are going to drop the big bucks..

Or Go C&V and hang out with that Group of Eroica Tifosi ..
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