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Good Chain Lube??? Mines WD40. :P

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Good Chain Lube??? Mines WD40. :P

Old 04-24-19, 07:18 AM
  #126  
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Originally Posted by WMBIGS View Post
I have used many bike chain lubes, tri-flow, 3in1. I have many quarts of synthetic hypoid 80-90 weight gear oil. Using an old tri-flow bottle, one little drop per link on a clean and dry chain. Clean with Park tool chain cleaner and repeat. Nothing like the smell of synthetic hypoid gear oil in the morning!!
Yes, gear lube is the "Patchouli oil" of the lubricant world.
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Old 04-24-19, 08:27 AM
  #127  
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Originally Posted by Brocephus View Post
Concerning the WD40 debate here, there seems to be some confusion about the term "lubricant". Obviously, the stuff can lubricate things, but that doesn't mean it's a legitimate lubricant, in the context used here.
The stuff lubricates, but only in the short term, but it is not an acceptable lubricant for mechanical devices.
Water is also a "lubricant", that's why vehicles stop less efficiently on wet roads, but that doesn't mean water is something you would classify as a "lubricant", and therefore use on mechanical devices, which is basically the 'logic' that keeps popping up here.
The oil contained in WD40 (about 35% by volume) is a parafinic oil of various molecular weights. The CAS numbers of the oil used in the mixture put it clearly in a lubricant category. Engine oil uses carbon molecules in the 18 to 35 carbon range. The oils in the WD40 mixture go as high as 50 carbon atoms per molecule. That makes it a heavier, thicker oil than motor oil (aka as “mineral oil”). Synthetic motor oil has a range of carbon atoms per molecule of 20 to 50. Waxes have even higher carbon counts.

Further, similar heavy petroleum distillate is used in both WD40 and Triflow. I don’t know of anyone who would say that Triflow isn’t a “lubricant”. WD40, in an aerosol form, suffers from overspray but it’s as an adequate lubricant.
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Old 04-24-19, 08:36 AM
  #128  
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Blah,blah,blah. WD40 sucks as a lubricant, for most everything beyond a squeaky door hinge ( and that's largely due to it's penetrative qualities, and it still doesn't last), that's why any and everybody that know anything about bikes, firearms, motorcycles, etc. almost universally recommend it not be used as a lubricant for those things. As I said, WD40, and virtually any other liquid, is in certain circumstance, technically a "lubricant", but for realistic, long-term applications, it generally ain't.
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Old 04-24-19, 09:14 AM
  #129  
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Originally Posted by DowneasTTer View Post
I have used many brands over my 50 years of cycling. Currently I find DuPont Telfon Chain-Saver to meet my needs. I purchased from Amazon here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...ustomerReviews
Could just be me, but I gave this a try and it was horrible. Made a mess going on, and in one 45 mile ride it went from being ok to the most drivetrain noise I've experienced. I cleaned it all off and went back to the Finishline Dry I was using, nice and quiet again. As always, YMMV.
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Old 04-24-19, 09:37 AM
  #130  
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Originally Posted by Brocephus View Post
Blah,blah,blah.
So you got nothin’ but uninformed opinion.

WD40 sucks as a lubricant, for most everything beyond a squeaky door hinge ( and that's largely due to it's penetrative qualities, and it still doesn't last), that's why any and everybody that know anything about bikes, firearms, motorcycles, etc. almost universally recommend it not be used as a lubricant for those things. As I said, WD40, and virtually any other liquid, is in certain circumstance, technically a "lubricant", but for realistic, long-term applications, it generally ain't.
Science says you are wrong. There’s lots of people out there that think they know a lot but really don’t. Frankly for a bicycle chain...let’s keep this on topic...there’s not much of anything that you can use that is vastly superior to anything else. That is borne out by the fact that chain wear is about the same independent of what you use for lubrication. Nor does anything work longer than anything else. They all have their limitations.
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Old 04-24-19, 12:06 PM
  #131  
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So, if WD40 is such a terrific all-purpose lubricant.....then why did they release this wide range if new purpose-specific lubricants? Seems like it would've been cheaper and easier to just advertise the amazing, universal capabilities of their well-known base product, if it really was all that.
But, in their wisdom, they realized that the planet is now widely aware of WD40's shortcomings, in a great many applications, so they decided to meet the demand with a variety of new and improved products, rather than buck the empirically-based consensus that WD40 is of limited value as a true lubricant.
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Old 04-24-19, 12:10 PM
  #132  
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Originally Posted by Brocephus View Post
So, if WD40 is such a terrific all-purpose lubricant.....then why did they release this wide range if new purpose-specific lubricants? Seems like it would've been cheaper and easier to just advertise the amazing, universal capabilities of their well-known base product, if it really was all that.
But, in their wisdom, they realized that the planet is now widely aware of WD40's shortcomings, in a great many applications, so they decided to meet the demand with a variety of new and improved products, rather than buck the empirically-based consensus that WD40 is of limited value as a true lubricant.
I just bought a can of WD-40 for bikes.
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Old 04-24-19, 12:39 PM
  #133  
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Originally Posted by DomaneS5 View Post
I just bought a can of WD-40 for bikes.
Cool, but I'm not quite sure what your point it. This new bike-specific version is widely known of, and has already been mentioned in this thread, and I vaguely alluded to it in my post. But the stuff you bought, obviously isn't plain, "original recipe" WD40, which is what's currently being debated.
I would assume this new product, being designed and marketed specifically as a bike lube, would be at least decent, and it's very existence is what I cited as evidence and acknowledgment that the original formula isn't very good for this application.
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Old 04-24-19, 01:13 PM
  #134  
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Originally Posted by Brocephus View Post
Cool, but I'm not quite sure what your point it. This new bike-specific version is widely known of, and has already been mentioned in this thread, and I vaguely alluded to it in my post. But the stuff you bought, obviously isn't plain, "original recipe" WD40, which is what's currently being debated.
I would assume this new product, being designed and marketed specifically as a bike lube, would be at least decent, and it's very existence is what I cited as evidence and acknowledgment that the original formula isn't very good for this application.
Actually White Lightning has worked well for me over the years, but there's certain bike parts where a spray like WD40 would be more practical.
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Old 04-24-19, 01:22 PM
  #135  
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Originally Posted by Brocephus View Post
Cool, but I'm not quite sure what your point it. This new bike-specific version is widely known of, and has already been mentioned in this thread, and I vaguely alluded to it in my post. But the stuff you bought, obviously isn't plain, "original recipe" WD40, which is what's currently being debated.
I would assume this new product, being designed and marketed specifically as a bike lube, would be at least decent, and it's very existence is what I cited as evidence and acknowledgment that the original formula isn't very good for this application.
It's also entirely possible that the biggest difference between WD-40 and WD-40 BIKE is the word "BIKE" on the front of the can.
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Old 04-24-19, 01:46 PM
  #136  
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I can only offer practical experience and not theory, heresay, bias or naysayers opinion. And WD40 works as a chain lubricant and as a bonus it cleans your chain.
The reason wd40 as a brand also has a bicycle chain specific cleaner is to make more money. The same reason lysol has 15 different bowl cleaners.
My other "practical experience" is with eco sheep lube, motor oil and white lithium aerosol. The sheep stuff is so very, very messy and it gets every where even the tires. However it does work. The motor oil is not near as messy and it works too , but you can't tell if the chain is dirty or not. Finally white lithium spray. I'm not sure how effective or long lasting it was because it gummed up and attracted dirt like you wouldn't believe. (I ummhum....used wd40 to clean it off). Personally I think dirt harms the chain more than not keeping it smothered in oil but what do I know. I only have a degree from the school of hard knocks.
If you decide to use the WD40 method, here's some experienced advice.
1. Spray only from the top of the chain.
2. Use a rag as a back stop when spraying.
3. Use same rag to wipe excess from chain.
4. Reapply every time you wash your bike or every 250-300 Miles which ever comes first.
5. Enjoy having a clean, lubed chain.
WARNING, WARNING: THE PRECEDING ADVICE WILL NOT WORK IF YOU HAVE REMOVED MANUFACTERES ORIGINAL LUBE!!!

Last edited by texaspandj; 04-24-19 at 02:35 PM.
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Old 04-24-19, 02:14 PM
  #137  
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Originally Posted by clengman View Post
It's also entirely possible that the biggest difference between WD-40 and WD-40 BIKE is the word "BIKE" on the front of the can.
I guess they put a ball bearing inside, and tell users to shake vigorously before use, just so no one will suspect that it's literally the same stuff that they've been selling for decades. Yeah, nice catch.
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Old 04-24-19, 02:18 PM
  #138  
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How & Why You Should Use Garage Door Lubricant

Choosing the Right Lubricant

There’s always some question as to what types of garage door lubricants are okay and what shouldn’t be used at all. Whatever you do, don’t spray WD-40 on your garage door parts. People commonly confuse this product, which has rust-destroying and degreasing properties with a lubricant because it generally helps metal parts move better. That action is from the cleaning, not from true lubrication.


Instead of WD-40, choose a silicone spray or white lithium grease to lubricate those moving parts. Aerosols are especially well-suited for injection into small moving parts, and these materials won’t attract dust or gum up like mechanic’s grease or engine oil. With the right lubricants, you may find your garage door singing a different tune next time you open the door after a long day at work.
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Old 04-24-19, 03:52 PM
  #139  
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Originally Posted by CrowSeph View Post
Have you tried paraffin wax?
I have used it, works great. there was an extensive test done by a laboratory using dyno with a bicycle drive train set up. Testing perhaps a hundred different types of (costly) chain lube, and paraffin wax came out with the lowest friction, least wear. And it was cheap.

I made a mix of paraffin wax and powered graphite (sold as lock lubricant), smeared it on the chain (after I cleaned it) and used a heat gun to get it to melt into the chain. I did not even have to remove the chain from the bike, I did it right on the bicycle.

I clean the chain with a Pedro's chain pig, using simple green, or other de-greaser. than use carb cleaner and compressed air. by doing it all on the bike, I will actually do it more often since it is not as much effort. Than I rub or smear on the wax and graphite mixture and heat it with a heat gun so it melts into the moving parts. it only costs about $3 for the wax, and $1 for the graphite lube, which give me enough to last for years.

It has never shifted better, does not attract dust and grit, cheap, and according to the tests, should allow my chain to last the longest.

In my damp climate, particularly on my mountain/trail bike, it is important to use a dry lube unless you want de-grease and re-lube your chain after each ride. I have had chains wear out very fast even using the costly specialty chain lube from my LBS. I will never use specialty chain lube again, no reason to.

Paraffin wax mixed with graphite has got to the best chain lube ever discovered.
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Old 04-24-19, 05:45 PM
  #140  
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Originally Posted by Brocephus View Post
So, if WD40 is such a terrific all-purpose lubricant.....then why did they release this wide range if new purpose-specific lubricants?
Because they want to make money. Companies make new products all the time for various reasons. Their original product may be just fine but people want something new.

Seems like it would've been cheaper and easier to just advertise the amazing, universal capabilities of their well-known base product, if it really was all that.
Have you seen the WD40 website? They advertise the crap out of the “amazing, universal capabilities of their well-koan base product”.

But, in their wisdom, they realized that the planet is now widely aware of WD40's shortcomings, in a great many applications, so they decided to meet the demand with a variety of new and improved products, rather than buck the empirically-based consensus that WD40 is of limited value as a true lubricant.
Again, go look at their website.
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Old 04-24-19, 06:00 PM
  #141  
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Originally Posted by Brocephus View Post

How & Why You Should Use Garage Door Lubricant

Choosing the Right Lubricant

There’s always some question as to what types of garage door lubricants are okay and what shouldn’t be used at all. Whatever you do, don’t spray WD-40 on your garage door parts. People commonly confuse this product, which has rust-destroying and degreasing properties with a lubricant because it generally helps metal parts move better. That action is from the cleaning, not from true lubrication.


Instead of WD-40, choose a silicone spray or white lithium grease to lubricate those moving parts. Aerosols are especially well-suited for injection into small moving parts, and these materials won’t attract dust or gum up like mechanic’s grease or engine oil. With the right lubricants, you may find your garage door singing a different tune next time you open the door after a long day at work.
It’s traditional to provide a link...or at least quotes...when you post something that you took from elsewhere. There might be valid reasons to avoid WD40 or the text may be from someone who is trying to sell a product.

If you look at the SDS for a number of garage door lubricants like I just did, you’ll find about the same list of ingredients as WD40. In many cases, they have the same CAS number. That says to this chemist that there is little to no difference.
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Old 04-24-19, 06:13 PM
  #142  
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https://customoverheaddoors.net/purp...oor-lubricant/
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Old 04-24-19, 06:32 PM
  #143  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
It’s traditional to provide a link...or at least quotes...when you post something that you took from elsewhere. There might be valid reasons to avoid WD40 or the text may be from someone who is trying to sell a product.

If you look at the SDS for a number of garage door lubricants like I just did, you’ll find about the same list of ingredients as WD40. In many cases, they have the same CAS number. That says to this chemist that there is little to no difference.
I agree that looking a product's SDS (Safety Date Sheet, which supplies the product's chemical composition) and CAS number is the best way to compare two product. Each chemical has it's own and unique chemical number called CAS, Chemical Abstract Service number. When two products have the same CAS number they have the SAME chemical/ingredient in both products.

You will be amaze how companies sell the same product but with different colors and/or scent. Just look at the SDS for comparison.
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Old 04-24-19, 06:55 PM
  #144  
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Originally Posted by CycleryNorth81 View Post
You will be amaze how companies sell the same product but with different colors and/or scent. Just look at the SDS for comparison.
No, he wouldn't be amazed. He is a long-time qualified and respected expert in chemistry, which amateurs, who have done some lazy on-line research, think they can outrank. This thread in the past couple of days of posting has been entertaining at least. There have been product discussed that I won't use on my bikes, but not necessarily WD40.
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Old 04-24-19, 06:59 PM
  #145  
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Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
No, he wouldn't be amazed. He is a long-time qualified and respected expert in chemistry, which amateurs, who have done some lazy on-line research, think they can outrank. This thread in the past couple of days of posting has been entertaining at least. There have been product discussed that I won't use on my bikes, but not necessarily WD40.
I was not referring to @cyccommute to being amaze. I am a scientist myself.
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Old 04-24-19, 07:01 PM
  #146  
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Originally Posted by Petros98223 View Post
Paraffin wax mixed with graphite has got to the best chain lube ever discovered.
Graphite , this sound now to me. Do you have other information?
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Old 04-24-19, 07:20 PM
  #147  
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Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
No, he wouldn't be amazed. He is a long-time qualified and respected expert in chemistry, which amateurs, who have done some lazy on-line research, think they can outrank. This thread in the past couple of days of posting has been entertaining at least. There have been product discussed that I won't use on my bikes, but not necessarily WD40.
Can't speak for lazy on-line Googlers, or long time respected scientists, but upon completion of the installation of our new garage door, I was specifically told to use NO oil or petroleum based lubricants.
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Old 04-24-19, 07:56 PM
  #148  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
It’s traditional to provide a link...or at least quotes...when you post something that you took from elsewhere. There might be valid reasons to avoid WD40 or the text may be from someone who is trying to sell a product.

If you look at the SDS for a number of garage door lubricants like I just did, you’ll find about the same list of ingredients as WD40. In many cases, they have the same CAS number. That says to this chemist that there is little to no difference.
Garage door openers have tracks that go from horizontal to vertical, WD40 would simply run off the tracks and would not lube the tracks, but it would clean the tracks, grease is heavier and thus not subject to run off plus it's more for a heavy duty use whereas WD40 is not. Also grease acts as a cushion due to it's heavier consistency, thus helps keep the rollers more silent as it runs up and down the tracks. A garage door weighs hundreds of pounds, so a thick lubricant is needed to endure the high mechanical stresses a garage door has.

Regardless, WD40 is a lubricant.
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Old 04-24-19, 08:24 PM
  #149  
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Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
Can't speak for lazy on-line Googlers, or long time respected scientists, but upon completion of the installation of our new garage door, I was specifically told to use NO oil or petroleum based lubricants.
So use silicone. That is the answer to that problem.
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Old 04-25-19, 01:29 AM
  #150  
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Originally Posted by CrowSeph View Post
Graphite , this sound now to me. Do you have other information?
it is sold as a dry lubricant for locks, it is simply a fine silvery powder sold in a tube. A small tube costs about $1 USD, larger tubes are a better deal (see the link below).

I saw some tests as a lubricant on bicycle chains and it was favorable except it does not repel moisture or prevent rust (we have a wet climate). So I heated the paraffin wax in a metal can, and mixed in some of the graphite.

https://www.amazon.com/Graphite-Lubr...9Q7SQ05FHV375P
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