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What should I be looking out for? (upgrades)

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What should I be looking out for? (upgrades)

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Old 04-17-19, 06:02 AM
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phile
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What should I be looking out for? (upgrades)

so i've had my first low end roadbike for about a month ish now. i can already see myself wanting some upgrades in the future when it comes to everything involving the drive train (please excuse my ignorance if i'm using wrong term). My bike is a btwin triban 100, ive read some things here and there about it not being worth the upgrades but at same tiem i saw some vid about a brazilian guy that upgraded gears shifters, crank set and couple other things using used parts.

now my idea was to just keep an eye out from time to time at the local equivalents to craigslist, and buy bit bit by bit until i have everything and either try and do the work myself (with bikeforum and youtube help) or take it to LBS. And this is where the problem comes in, i am mostly ignorant about what i would even have to be looking for when it comes to parts. So what should i be looking for and snatching up if i see it in the local online marketplaces?


Edit: if this makes more sense in bike mechanics subforum please move there.

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Old 04-17-19, 11:05 AM
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Reviews not to bad for the bike on Road.cc . I say ride the good out of it first unless theres something you really don't like about it.
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Old 04-17-19, 02:24 PM
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it is your bike and your money .... and your life.

So let me tell you how to do everything.

Seriously, you do Not want to go the "upgrade" route unless you have a ton of time, a ton of bike-specific tools, and ton of basic mechanical ability, and six tons of cash.

Bike mechanics are simple and easy, but there are still ten thousand little things that can go wrong. Some cost time, some cost money, some cost big money. Plus there are changing standards which create incompatibilities---you buy a part form the same company which made the original part, and they look the same, but the new one doesn't work with all the old stuff so now you have to buy All new stuff.

Then there are the tiny important parts you bend, break, or drop in the grass or which roll down the storm drain.

I do most of my own work (and occasionally pay others to fix my errors) but i spent a Lot of time making mistakes. it is a lot easier now with all the YouTube videos .... and a lot of it is worth learning if you are going to have a bike .... but you will need to buy a lot of tools and learn a lot of terms and parts specifications or you will be making a Lot of trips to the bike shop.

And with parts prices climbing steeply, getting upgrade parts is either more expensive than buying a better bike, or takes a year of shopping online to find something worth buying and which actually works, and matches the description of what you tired to buy. You can usually get your money back but it can be a hassle and a waste of time ....

Your best bet ... well two options.

One is to save your money and buy a better bike in a couple years. You can generally buy a new bike for the same or less money than it would cost to upgrade your old bike, and with the new bike, you get a warranty, the latest technology, and a better frame than the old one. (Not too much sense in putting really good parts on an entry-level frame---)

Another option is to buy a Bikes Direct/Bike Island type bike--- a mediocre bike with some good parts. Then, swap the parts to your old bike, and .... you have two not so great bikes. Hmmmm.

I would suggest waiting and saving. In a couple seasons, buy a Really nice bike .... the best you can afford. That way, either you won't have to upgrade, or if you choose to, some seasons further down the line, you wont be putting Ferrari parts on an old rusty Fiat.
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Old 04-17-19, 02:27 PM
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Interesting design for a modern bike. I'd want to address the shifter, first thing. Maybe go with a Sora or even a 105 brifter. The brakes might be another good upgrade. 105 calipers should work with those levers, so that would be easy. Wheels and tires are going to be on the list, but not urgent. The main thing, though, is that steel fork. A decent carbon fiber fork would be a huge improvement, but not an easy DIY swap if you haven't done it, before. For now, though, just enjoy it, as is. With a little basic maintenance, it probably has several years before you need to do anything except swap tubes, brake pads, and chain.
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Old 04-17-19, 03:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
it is your bike and your money .... and your life.

So let me tell you how to do everything.

Seriously, you do Not want to go the "upgrade" route unless you have a ton of time, a ton of bike-specific tools, and ton of basic mechanical ability, and six tons of cash.

Bike mechanics are simple and easy, but there are still ten thousand little things that can go wrong. Some cost time, some cost money, some cost big money. Plus there are changing standards which create incompatibilities---you buy a part form the same company which made the original part, and they look the same, but the new one doesn't work with all the old stuff so now you have to buy All new stuff.

Then there are the tiny important parts you bend, break, or drop in the grass or which roll down the storm drain.

I do most of my own work (and occasionally pay others to fix my errors) but i spent a Lot of time making mistakes. it is a lot easier now with all the YouTube videos .... and a lot of it is worth learning if you are going to have a bike .... but you will need to buy a lot of tools and learn a lot of terms and parts specifications or you will be making a Lot of trips to the bike shop.

And with parts prices climbing steeply, getting upgrade parts is either more expensive than buying a better bike, or takes a year of shopping online to find something worth buying and which actually works, and matches the description of what you tired to buy. You can usually get your money back but it can be a hassle and a waste of time ....

Your best bet ... well two options.

One is to save your money and buy a better bike in a couple years. You can generally buy a new bike for the same or less money than it would cost to upgrade your old bike, and with the new bike, you get a warranty, the latest technology, and a better frame than the old one. (Not too much sense in putting really good parts on an entry-level frame---)

Another option is to buy a Bikes Direct/Bike Island type bike--- a mediocre bike with some good parts. Then, swap the parts to your old bike, and .... you have two not so great bikes. Hmmmm.

I would suggest waiting and saving. In a couple seasons, buy a Really nice bike .... the best you can afford. That way, either you won't have to upgrade, or if you choose to, some seasons further down the line, you wont be putting Ferrari parts on an old rusty Fiat.
I agree 99.9% with this statement. If you live in Europe, Bikes Direct isn't an option, thus the -.1% downgrade. Your bike is good as is, but it is a very poor candidate for any sort of upgrade. I would suggest instead that every time you get the urge to buy some "upgrade" component that you put aside the cost of that upgrade and continue to ride your bike as long as it remains useable and reliable. As long as basic repairs to it are not costly, ride it as is. However, given the 1 x 7 drivetrain, upgrades will be very costly, very soon. Going from a 7 speed freewheel threaded axle to 8,9,10, or 11 speeds with a cassette is a very big jump, if you want to go to current standards, you need a new, 11 speed compatible rear wheel. In simple terms, your bike is fine as it is, upgrading it to anything close to the current state of the art is a losing proposition.
Upgrades require either tools(which cost money) or shop time(which also costs money) Very few people can upgrade bikes cost effectively unless they already own the tools and know how to obtain compatible second hand parts

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Old 04-18-19, 12:25 AM
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I hate to join in a pile-on, but there’s a lot more that goes into bikes besides which parts are hung on it.
Not that you’ve got a ‘bad’ bike. It’s a perfectly serviceable, inexpensive, recreational bike, with a decent blend of features and durability for the price, but at the expense of high performance.

Upgrading that bike to a current-generation entry level ‘Claris’ group would involve changing ‘everything but the paint job’ and probably cost more than you paid for the bike in the first place. And that’s just in parts. If you’re having a shop do the work, it’s going to get expensive.
You will find it is often less expensive to simply buy a higher-tier bike than to make large scale upgrades to an inexpensive one.

There’s also a lot more to a ‘nicer’ bike than what parts are bolted to it. Frames are lighter, stronger, better finished, and trimmed out.
Being that you have a pretty entry-level bike, it’s only going to have so much upgrade ability it’ll support, anyhow.


Ride it as is. Learn how to adjust and tune it, to keep it working as well as you can. As you ride your bike, figure out what it is that you want out of your bike. Make small changes, things like different tires and better brake pads can make a noticeable difference for not a lot of money.
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Old 04-18-19, 01:37 AM
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believe it or not i understand where everyone is comign from, this is not gonna be any short term upgrading, more likely pick up something second hand here and there over time until i have a complete groupset. expecting this to go bit by bit over a 2 year period. while i would continue to ride. i enjoy the ride,i'm just thinking i might outgrow the gearing and would want a better groupset, besides that i am honestly happy with everything else.

Because of this I would honestly go for upgrading group set and be happy with results, this taking into account the extra costs.
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Old 04-18-19, 01:55 AM
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Have you considered upgrading all the 'touch' points instead? You seem to be generally happy with the bike and you think you may outgrow the gearing, which may or may not happen.

In the meantime, you may be able to enjoy the bike even more with more subtle upgrades over time like tyres, saddle, pedals, brake pads etc.
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Old 04-18-19, 02:03 AM
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I have upgraded saddle with a brooks b17, and did quite a bit of aesthetic upgrades. I am pretty sure i will out grow the gearing since right now my standard gear is 5th gear and when going for faster workout rides i'm going about 70 % 6th 30% 7th and although not for long i am able to outpedal that gear
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