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Tubeless vs Tubular reliability

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Tubeless vs Tubular reliability

Old 05-02-19, 12:20 PM
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Teamprovicycle
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Tubeless vs Tubular reliability

Here is a question I wonder about . You never really see anyone complaining about things that tubeless tires do , as Tubular tire users .
I read way more complaints about tubeless set ups , and I wonder if Tubular users have the same issues , are there just less of them , hmmmmmmmm ,whats the deal with that**********
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Old 05-02-19, 12:41 PM
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I have tubes in the main cycle, & I've had flats happen that nothing would have saved it no matter if it were tube or tubeless.

Spending the time to pair up a wheel set with tires & tubes on my part seems to have provided me with that rationale. Also, the area in which the bicycle is used matters for how likely a flat might happen.
The surfaces in my area flat out suck. Boulders of road rolling around, rerod pieces stick up at random, garbage debris drifting about, & locals intentionally breaking whiskey bottles along the pedestrian routes are just a tip of the iceberg for describing surface conditions my wheels are exposed to.

The wheels I've gone thru b/c of the above have shown me that certain businesses are stellar when it comes to warranty coverages. I've disclosed what may have been a reason for the tire/wheel to fail, & they've without a fuss exchanged the bad item for a free replacement item. I did not expect the warranty to cover most of what I've brought in for the failed item[s], but sometimes it pays to have a good relationship with business owners (B&M & Online retailers) .

I do not abuse the warranty, however, I will provide feedback as they often ask for it.
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Old 05-02-19, 02:46 PM
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Are you talking about "tubular" or clinchers with inner tubes?

If the former - yeah, they just call for a ride home if they get a flat
If the latter - many of the people here are obsessed with getting tires that prevent flats.

Tubeless tires are a PITA to install sometimes (super easy other times), and once on the bike are almost worry free. Well, so far - knock on wood.
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Old 05-02-19, 03:51 PM
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Sew ups go way back ,, 100 years maybe ..


you do have to sew to fix them..
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Old 05-02-19, 04:24 PM
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Working in a bike shop since 82, I have installed lots and lots of tubular tires and tubeless tires. Much rather install tubular tires any day over tubeless. Tubeless is a total PIA to deal with.

When I road tubulars there were no real issues to deal with. Flats happened, but not at an elevated rate compared to tube tires. Tubular wheels are light and handle really well. Ride quality is excellent, even on cheap tubulars. There is no sealant to top off or replace annually. Installation is no big deal and once understood is fairly easy to get on straight as long as a quality tubular tire is being used. Cheapies never go on straight.

Today I only run tubed tires. Simple, effective, cheap, easy to deal with, and easy to repair. If they leak, replace the tube.
Tubular tires are expensive, except for the cheapies, but cheapies don't last and never run straight. If a tubular leaks, it is a big effort to repair and usually is best left to someone who is willing and patient to go through the process.


Tubeless tires require more attention to get to seal when they leak. Honestly, unless one lives in goathead country or experiences a whole lot of flats, there is no logical reason to deal with the hassle of tubeless.
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Old 05-02-19, 04:57 PM
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My biggest hassle with tubulars didn't have to do with the tubulars themselves, just the sealant I used to fix a slow leak (it totally clogged the valve). Oh and the time I broke a spoke and the wheel had internal nipples, so I had to take off the tubular and I did such a great glue job that I tore the base tape. But like I said, that had less to do with the tubulars themselves.

As to installing, I put a new one on last night. I had pre stretched and preglued it, so it was ready to go. Another coat of glue, snugged it on, pumped it up, a little adjusting, repumped, done. 10 minutes, max, easy peasy.
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Old 05-03-19, 05:04 AM
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
My biggest hassle with tubulars didn't have to do with the tubulars themselves, just the sealant I used to fix a slow leak (it totally clogged the valve). Oh and the time I broke a spoke and the wheel had internal nipples, so I had to take off the tubular and I did such a great glue job that I tore the base tape. But like I said, that had less to do with the tubulars themselves.

As to installing, I put a new one on last night. I had pre stretched and preglued it, so it was ready to go. Another coat of glue, snugged it on, pumped it up, a little adjusting, repumped, done. 10 minutes, max, easy peasy.
Rinse clogged valve under hot running water.
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Old 05-03-19, 05:49 AM
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I run Hutchinson tubeless 700cx28 tires on Swiss tubeless rims. They are tight to get onto the rims but once that is done, I can seat them, with a hand pump. I run Orange Seal with glitter added to the mix. It is about as worry free as ever. Now if the rims and tires aren't designed to run tubeless, then it is a PITA.

The only bikes that I have that run tubes are our road and mountain tandems and they both have sealant in the tubes.

As for tubular tires. My old bike shop used to ***** and moan about them with the glue involved in installing them.
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Old 05-03-19, 05:42 PM
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Certain people in the shop complained loudly if they had to change a tubular. What did we do? Assigned the task to them! The squeaky wheel got the grease, er...glue! After doing enough of them, one learns the tricks to the trade.
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Old 05-04-19, 12:06 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
do they make wide tubular tires, like 32 for comfort?
Yes.

Sewups are still pretty big in CX land. Many are 33, cuz 33 is max allowed size in UCI CX.

https://www.biketiresdirect.com/prod...ss-tire?sg=500
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Old 05-04-19, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
do they make wide tubular tires, like 32 for comfort?
A 28mm tubular is more comfortable than a 32mm clincher, IMO.
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Old 05-04-19, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
do they make wide tubular tires, like 32 for comfort?
Yes, they do. Many of the bikes in Paris-Roubaix the past few years have used 32mm tubulars. They are all custom made, mostly by FMB. FMB will make anything you ask for, it just costs you. If your bike will take a 33, cyclocross tubulars for dry courses work very well as road tires. Keep your eyes open and those are often available surprisingly cheap.
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Old 05-04-19, 12:23 PM
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Dry Course CX tires example
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Old 05-05-19, 05:14 PM
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I cannot speak to a long term experience with Mavic USTs but so far my (very) short time has been as GCN says:

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Old 05-05-19, 07:56 PM
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I'm in the same situation, changed this year to Mavic's and so far so good. Installing is simple unlike most other tubeless tires. Only time will tell if it was a good decision.
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Old 05-05-19, 08:53 PM
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Tubular tire users suffer mightily

but maintain a code of silence, to preserve the mystique.
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Old 05-06-19, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by bruce19 View Post
I cannot speak to a long term experience with Mavic USTs but so far my (very) short time has been as GCN says:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALVtgcY1YeM
I've been on them going on 7 months and they have been outstanding. No issues...currently rolling 28's.
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Old 05-06-19, 10:39 AM
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I am another fan of wide tubulars. Best ride ever, and I never thought the gluing part was that troublesome. Although the best clinchers come close nowadays. I have never tried tubeless but have no reason to.
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Old 05-06-19, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
How you ever tried to fix a flat out on the side of road?
If you've got a glued spare in a tire bag, it's usually not too tough.
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Old 05-06-19, 04:00 PM
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Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
Tubular tire users suffer mightily

but maintain a code of silence, to preserve the mystique.
I suffered 25 years? Didn't even notice.

Good tubulars have "the ride" that only the very best clinchers/tubeless can get close to. I call it the magic carpet. They corner absurdly well. (Look at the bank angles in photos of any '70s criterium.) And there is a level of security I don't feel with any other tire - knowing that no matter how fast I am going, if I flat, even have a full front tire blowout, I am going to be able to use both brakes and ride the bike to a stop. (Assuming no melted glue. You gotta pay attention.) I've done it going 45 downhill. Heartstopper but that was all. I blew out a clincher at 25 to a crash that made my top-5 list.

When my house roof is paid off, I will probably make the move back to tubulars - for the security going down big descents. (The easy way to justify the expense of the magic carpet tickets.) I will have to relearn what tires are those carpets. Technology has changed things a lot; I suspect flat-wise for the better.

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Old 05-06-19, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
How you ever tried to fix a flat out on the side of road?
I have. 40 miles from home, long before cell phones. 2nd flat. Carried the standard patchkit with needle and thread. Not one of my best repairs but it worked fine.

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Old 05-06-19, 09:35 PM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
How you ever tried to fix a flat out on the side of road?


I have as well.
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Old 05-08-19, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
How you ever tried to fix a flat out on the side of road?
The myth that it's a real problem will never die.
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Old 05-09-19, 02:14 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
How you ever tried to fix a flat out on the side of road?
LOL yep. I can swap a tubbie faster than some can change a tube in a clincher. I have done it on a group ride. I suck at actually fixing a tubular though once I am home. Base tape hates me. If it is per glued you can ride hard and if it is not than you can still ride home.
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Old 05-09-19, 05:47 AM
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Originally Posted by mtb_addict View Post
How you ever tried to fix a flat out on the side of road?
As mentioned by others, I've changed many a tubular on the side of the road.
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