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Best Bike Multitool

Old 05-18-19, 01:50 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
My EDC is a Crank Bros M10 but on my road bike I have been trying the Spurcycle tool and love it. My only complaints about both tools is neither of them use a JIS screwdriver which would be way better. However so far I haven't seen anyone do a tool with a JIS screwdriver.

I really do want to try the PB Swiss tool but I need to get their allen keys and Torx keys first for my tool box.

As far as shop tools, get the best in the basics at the very least. I didn't like the idea of buying cheaper tools and then rebuying tools later so I prefer to spend the money upfront and get what I want.
I know what you mean.. For me it's just so I have something rather than nothing.
Id like to have a decent basic set to do many things I need and buy a few tools along the way as I need more..
But since the high end park tools is not in my budget and Id like to have something.. id settle for getting a basic set of good quality but lesser priced tools since right now I don't have any shop bike tools.
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Old 05-18-19, 07:30 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Juggy_Gales View Post
I know what you mean.. For me it's just so I have something rather than nothing.
Id like to have a decent basic set to do many things I need and buy a few tools along the way as I need more..
But since the high end park tools is not in my budget and Id like to have something.. id settle for getting a basic set of good quality but lesser priced tools since right now I don't have any shop bike tools.
Sure sure, but at least getting your most used tools as top end as you can get makes the most sense. If you don't change a lot of pedals, then a cheap pedal wrench is probably not going to be so bad and likewise for another tool that is less used. However things like allen keys, a JIS screwdriver and a cable/housing cutter should be of good quality and you can get a decent ones for not a whole lot. The Pedro's L-Wrench set is about $35, a Vessel Megadora JIS screwdriver is about $11 and the Jagwire Housing cutter is about $40. That will get you done with most of the important stuff people do more often. If you have those and probably a good T25 torx key you can do quite a bit of normal maintenance. Depending on my chain situation I may get a good chain tool or a masterlink plyers (Wolf Tooth comes to mind as they are portable, good quality and store master links in them) but for most basic stuff the three tools will generally get you by fairly well.
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Old 05-18-19, 07:43 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
Sure sure, but at least getting your most used tools as top end as you can get makes the most sense. If you don't change a lot of pedals, then a cheap pedal wrench is probably not going to be so bad and likewise for another tool that is less used. However things like allen keys, a JIS screwdriver and a cable/housing cutter should be of good quality and you can get a decent ones for not a whole lot. The Pedro's L-Wrench set is about $35, a Vessel Megadora JIS screwdriver is about $11 and the Jagwire Housing cutter is about $40. That will get you done with most of the important stuff people do more often. If you have those and probably a good T25 torx key you can do quite a bit of normal maintenance. Depending on my chain situation I may get a good chain tool or a masterlink plyers (Wolf Tooth comes to mind as they are portable, good quality and store master links in them) but for most basic stuff the three tools will generally get you by fairly well.
This is good tool-buying advice in general, really.

M.
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Old 05-18-19, 08:13 PM
  #29  
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Yes I don't want to get Cheap tools.. when I said inexpensive.. I meant as for a kit.. I didn't wanna drop $300-700 off the cuff..
I was looking at this kit here..

BIKE HAND

and I was going to also get a few higher end frequently used tools as well.
I have good wire cutters and crimpers..

But if you guys have another kit in mind I will look at it.. or Instead I'll just get a toolbox and buy tools piece by piece like you listed.
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Old 05-18-19, 08:33 PM
  #30  
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Those kits are ok. Definitely better than they use to be. I keep one of those type on my truck and Park Tool at home. But better is Pedro's. Not as good as Park but still well made and should last a lifetime.. I like to think Pedro's about like Craftsman and Park like Snap-On.
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Old 05-18-19, 08:34 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Juggy_Gales View Post
Yes I don't want to get Cheap tools.. when I said inexpensive.. I meant as for a kit.. I didn't wanna drop $300-700 off the cuff..
I was looking at this kit here..

BIKE HAND

and I was going to also get a few higher end frequently used tools as well.
I have good wire cutters and crimpers..

But if you guys have another kit in mind I will look at it.. or Instead I'll just get a toolbox and buy tools piece by piece like you listed.
I didn't go kit because I don't like kits. I like to pick what would work best and sometimes the kits are designed more for price than maybe quality or they stick you with only tools from that manufacturer which doesn't work well for me.
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Old 05-18-19, 08:58 PM
  #32  
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Something else to consider. When doing quick repairs or adjustments on the road getting a tool that doesn’t consist of a bunch of tiny pieces that will get dropped and lost easily.
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Old 05-18-19, 09:10 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by hillyman View Post
Those kits are ok. Definitely better than they use to be. I keep one of those type on my truck and Park Tool at home. But better is Pedro's. Not as good as Park but still well made and should last a lifetime.. I like to think Pedro's about like Craftsman and Park like Snap-On.
I had wondered if Park was considered better than Pedro's or vice versa. I suspect after a certain level it's all basically the same since few-to-none of the tools we use are actually subject to super punishment or anything.

M.
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Old 05-18-19, 09:29 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
The one I currently carry is the Fix-It-Stick system.
I picked up a set of "Fix-It-Sticks" at InterBike a couple years ago. I like the ability to interchange the hex bits so I can have all the ones I need.

On my folding commuter bike, a Tern, I carry a "Tern Tool", which has everything I need for normal maintenance.

For my bikes that use removable master links, I have a Wolf Tooth master link pliers with storage space for an extra link. I didn't actually *need* this tool, but I liked the design and construction.
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Old 05-18-19, 10:43 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Cool tool was Cool (at 1 time they had a Ti version ).. Gerber bought them out as I understand


There is a multitool Wiki?
https://wiki.multitool.org/tiki-inde...page=Cool+Tool

Still the best bike multitool made.
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Old 05-18-19, 11:04 PM
  #36  
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I have a Topeak 18 for my commuter/hybrid, and a Topeak 9 for my road bike. Both are good for on-the-road fixes but I wouldn't ever consider pulling them out of my saddle bag in the garage to do real work. I have real tools for when I'm at home. I also owned a Topeak Alien II for awhile. I wish I knew where that went. It, too, was a nice tool, though heavy.

I've found, in practice, that once I get a bike well dialed-in, I never need the tool while out riding. Even on rare occasion where I have a mechanical issue on the road, the multi-tool has never been the right tool for the job at hand. Actually, the only mechanical issue I've ever had where a tool (aside from tire levers) might have been useful was a snapped rear shift cable (25 miles from home). What I *should* have done is used a multi-tool to tune the high gears out of the rear derailleur, forcing it to stay in a middle gear. That way I could have done my shifting using the triple front crankset and would have made it home without calling for a lift. But that didn't occur to me, so I limped along my 11t rear cog to somewhere I could call for a ride.

So although I have one multi-tool for each bike, I find that about halfway through each biking season I'm sufficiently satisfied with the bike's condition, and I take the tools out of my seat bags because I know I'm going to be doing some excruciating climb where the psychological advantage of not carrying that extra 1/6th of a pound makes all the difference in the world. (Joking of course, but this is how we tend to think as we toil up a steep climb, isn't it?) And so far I've never been in a situation where I regret not having it with me, though I don't doubt that day will come eventually.

Of course my good fortune of not needing a multi-tool as I ride is probably a product of my riding habits. My normal rides originate from my home, take me somewhere 7 to 35 miles away, and then back to home again. If I were setting out on some multi-day touring adventure, my need for a portable tool would be greater. Because as it is, I check things over before I head out, and if something minor comes up along the ride I make a mental note of it and take care of it when I get home. That strategy isn't as effective if your ride doesn't start and end at home each day.

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Old 05-19-19, 02:24 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
I had wondered if Park was considered better than Pedro's or vice versa. I suspect after a certain level it's all basically the same since few-to-none of the tools we use are actually subject to super punishment or anything.

M.
Well I'm sure the fine folks at Pedro's would disagree with me on who's better. I'm just going by price of each compared and my own humble opinion. All bike tools probably will get the job done if everything runs smooth. But when part your working on have been tightened too tight, welded themselves together or bolts are rounded off you might kick yourself for buying one of those $50 cheap tool kits.
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Old 05-19-19, 02:34 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Cool tool was Cool (at 1 time they had a Ti version ).. Gerber bought them out as I understand


There is a multitool Wiki?
https://wiki.multitool.org/tiki-inde...page=Cool+Tool

That tool was slightly better than some wrenches and screwdrivers rolled up in an old sock. But I miss my old Cooltool. Every now and then will look for one on Ebay but no luck. Surprised not an old warehouse somewhere full of them.
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Old 05-19-19, 06:02 AM
  #39  
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https://www.amazon.com/CRANKBROTHERs...26661019&psc=1
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Old 05-19-19, 06:26 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by hillyman View Post
Well I'm sure the fine folks at Pedro's would disagree with me on who's better. I'm just going by price of each compared and my own humble opinion. All bike tools probably will get the job done if everything runs smooth. But when part your working on have been tightened too tight, welded themselves together or bolts are rounded off you might kick yourself for buying one of those $50 cheap tool kits.
Depends.. I'd take the Pedros Chain Checker Plus II over the Park CC3.2 for a variety of reasons. IOW I think there's spot opportunities for one vs the other to provide better value.
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Old 05-19-19, 06:31 AM
  #41  
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I'm a minimalist and can probably count on one hand the number of times during a ride I've needed a tool (other than levers).. For me, perfect is the SKS Tom7 for the just in case scenario. Though I'm intrigued by the prior mention of the Barstow chain tool.

SKS Tom7 MultiTool


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Old 05-19-19, 07:29 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Sy Reene View Post
Depends.. I'd take the Pedros Chain Checker Plus II over the Park CC3.2 for a variety of reasons. IOW I think there's spot opportunities for one vs the other to provide better value.
Very true. I bought one of the Park Tool kits and had some of the tools laid out with some various other tools. Much to my surprise the allen wrenches I got with the Park kit were the exact same set I'd bought earlier from Walmart. Just amazing what some will do for cost savings.
Not saying Park best at everything. But some of the standard tools a little more robust than Pedro's. But either fine to run a bike repair shop with.
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Old 05-19-19, 08:14 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Juggy_Gales View Post
How do I get a Post Moved to a diff section.. I think this Post would be better in Bike Mechanics but didn't see the category until after
If you really want it moved, I can move it but you're getting a lot of responses here. It's up to you.
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Old 05-19-19, 11:58 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by drlogik View Post

Is it cool to carry individual 5mm and 4mm Allen keys, a Park chain tool, two tire irons and a small Phillips screwdriver? No.
I think it's cool! IMO, a few individual tools work better than a multi-tool and save weight because they only have what you might need. Saving weight and a working bike are both cool.
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Old 05-19-19, 12:44 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by daoswald View Post
Actually, the only mechanical issue I've ever had where a tool (aside from tire levers) might have been useful was a snapped rear shift cable (25 miles from home). What I *should* have done is used a multi-tool to tune the high gears out of the rear derailleur, forcing it to stay in a middle gear. That way I could have done my shifting using the triple front crankset and would have made it home without calling for a lift. But that didn't occur to me, so I limped along my 11t rear cog to somewhere I could call for a ride.
In this situation the things I have done have been find a stick the right length or diameter and wedge it in the parallelogram of the RD to sit in a gear that works. That one I call "stick shift". The other is to take the broken inner cable and tie it off on the frame in a gear that works.
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Old 05-19-19, 01:51 PM
  #46  
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Topeak mini 20 gets my vote.
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Old 05-19-19, 02:14 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Mitkraft View Post
Something else to consider. When doing quick repairs or adjustments on the road getting a tool that doesnít consist of a bunch of tiny pieces that will get dropped and lost easily.
Originally Posted by MEversbergII View Post
I had wondered if Park was considered better than Pedro's or vice versa. I suspect after a certain level it's all basically the same since few-to-none of the tools we use are actually subject to super punishment or anything.

M.
Originally Posted by sweeks View Post
I picked up a set of "Fix-It-Sticks" at InterBike a couple years ago. I like the ability to interchange the hex bits so I can have all the ones I need.

On my folding commuter bike, a Tern, I carry a "Tern Tool", which has everything I need for normal maintenance.

For my bikes that use removable master links, I have a Wolf Tooth master link pliers with storage space for an extra link. I didn't actually *need* this tool, but I liked the design and construction.
Originally Posted by daoswald View Post
I have a Topeak 18 for my commuter/hybrid, and a Topeak 9 for my road bike. Both are good for on-the-road fixes but I wouldn't ever consider pulling them out of my saddle bag in the garage to do real work. I have real tools for when I'm at home. I also owned a Topeak Alien II for awhile. I wish I knew where that went. It, too, was a nice tool, though heavy.

I've found, in practice, that once I get a bike well dialed-in, I never need the tool while out riding. Even on rare occasion where I have a mechanical issue on the road, the multi-tool has never been the right tool for the job at hand. Actually, the only mechanical issue I've ever had where a tool (aside from tire levers) might have been useful was a snapped rear shift cable (25 miles from home). What I *should* have done is used a multi-tool to tune the high gears out of the rear derailleur, forcing it to stay in a middle gear. That way I could have done my shifting using the triple front crankset and would have made it home without calling for a lift. But that didn't occur to me, so I limped along my 11t rear cog to somewhere I could call for a ride.

So although I have one multi-tool for each bike, I find that about halfway through each biking season I'm sufficiently satisfied with the bike's condition, and I take the tools out of my seat bags because I know I'm going to be doing some excruciating climb where the psychological advantage of not carrying that extra 1/6th of a pound makes all the difference in the world. (Joking of course, but this is how we tend to think as we toil up a steep climb, isn't it?) And so far I've never been in a situation where I regret not having it with me, though I don't doubt that day will come eventually.

Of course my good fortune of not needing a multi-tool as I ride is probably a product of my riding habits. My normal rides originate from my home, take me somewhere 7 to 35 miles away, and then back to home again. If I were setting out on some multi-day touring adventure, my need for a portable tool would be greater. Because as it is, I check things over before I head out, and if something minor comes up along the ride I make a mental note of it and take care of it when I get home. That strategy isn't as effective if your ride doesn't start and end at home each day.
Originally Posted by Trsnrtr View Post
If you really want it moved, I can move it but you're getting a lot of responses here. It's up to you.
Thanks everyone for your advice on the tools..
I will continue to look at Tools and though I have found usefulness in multi-tools on a ride more so with friends I am riding with
I will end up probably buying tools piece by piece as I need them for my home set up. So I am not stuck with tons of tools I don't need
and don't use.
I knew of Pedros tire levers but did not know they had a whole line of tools I will look into them if they are quality tools for a
lesser price of Park.

as far as moving the post.. No you are right I got a good amount of response here.
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Old 05-19-19, 02:18 PM
  #48  
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In tens of thousands of miles, I've only ever needed

Spoke wrench
4mm Allen key
5mm Allen key
Flat driver
Chain tool
1 lever


I've broken the Topeak Chain tool, so won't use aluminum chain tools any more.

The Pedros 6 Pack contains 3 of the above (spoke key, flat driver, 5mm, steel chain tool), so I just add a separate 4mm Allen key.


Last edited by f4rrest; 05-20-19 at 06:54 AM. Reason: Pedro's, not Park.
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Old 05-19-19, 05:03 PM
  #49  
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I carry a Topeak. Itís about 3 years old. Iíve used the side scab tire irons to change flats out on the road. I also carryís Swiss Army knife. Other than flats, I havenít needed either, but I would want to be on a long ride without either.
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Old 05-19-19, 05:14 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by hillyman View Post
That tool was slightly better than some wrenches and screwdrivers rolled up in an old sock. But I miss my old Cooltool. Every now and then will look for one on Ebay but no luck. Surprised not an old warehouse somewhere full of them.
I still have my titanium Cool Tool in my obsolete parts bin. I haven't had any use for it for a few decades but I'm too sentimental to chuck it.



These days, it's been replaced by Wolf Tooth Pack Pliers and an I9 Matchstix.




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