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Compass Rene Herse Center Pulls

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Compass Rene Herse Center Pulls

Old 02-24-20, 03:31 AM
  #26  
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From the comments at https://www.renehersecycles.com/why-...erpull-brakes/

Ted Durant October 22, 2019 at 8:48 am # What’s the maximum practical tire width for Compass Centerpull brakes?

  • Jan Heine October 23, 2019 at 7:40 pm # 44 mm with fenders (and sufficient clearances) or 55 mm without fenders.
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Old 02-24-20, 03:47 AM
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Post splay

I meant to say that my builder brazed the front posts directly to the (sloping) fork crown. This makes the posts extremely rigid.
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Old 02-06-24, 05:18 AM
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Originally Posted by seamuis
Ive never purchased any of their branded components other than their tires, and have no idea where any of it is made, but something made in Taiwan is every bit as good or better as anything made in France back then. Your words seem to insinuate either poor quality, or not worth the price, solely based on where it’s made. Neither of which, as blanket statements, are true. As to what’s “overpriced”, is a matter of personal financial opinion, and more often than not, has little to do with actual quality. My Taiwan made VO handlebars and porteur rack as well as my Taiwan made Dia Compe 189 brake levers are fine quality. As are my Chinese made, Taiwanese owned H+Son rims. You’re welcome to express your opinion of course, but I think the OP will decide for themselves what’s ‘overpriced’ or not, and rightly so. I highly doubt the actual price is the main concern here. It’s more about ready to go right out of the box, or invest in restoration and refurbish.

I recently learned from someone i can say, and everyone here can if they knew who, that the Rene Herse Nivex is essentially made by a German living in Taiwan. The Rene Herse Centre Pull brakes, and the Grand Bois CP brakes are also designed by this same German. I don't know the name. it's supposed to be a secret as it appears.
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Old 02-10-24, 04:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Big in Japan
I meant to say that my builder brazed the front posts directly to the (sloping) fork crown. This makes the posts extremely rigid.
Who is the builder, if you don't mind mentioning?
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Old 02-24-24, 02:11 PM
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I'm quite late to the party, here, but thought I would throw-in my perspective, since I think I'm about to pull the trigger on a set of the RH brakes, along with the front rack which is designed to go with them. It's a lot of money to pay, and I'm hesitant/cognizant, on that score, for sure.

In my case, I'm having (another) custom frame built, and this one I want to be a very classically-styled randonneuse type affair. I have other bikes for other types of riding, and this one I want to be very singularly unique. The direct-mount center pull brakes seem like the way to go, and here's how I came to that conclusion:

* I could go with cantilever brakes, but I already have a bike with cantilevers. The new bike won't ever be outfitted with tires >38mm, for "mostly road" type riding. So cantilevers brakes aren't really "needed" for tire clearance.
* I could easily go with plain-'ol side-pull calipers, but I definitely want a front rack, and there just aren't many lightweight, nice looking options that pair-up with a center-mounted, side-pull caliper brake.
* There is the Paul Racer, which I think is a great option, but to my eye it's a bit fugly, more expensive, and -- again -- won't play nice with any rack that I know of.

As per all the observations about simply grabbing a set of Mafac RAIDs: sure, I totally agree. Basically the same brake. As much as I do enjoy tinkering endlessly on bikes and parts, I don't need to "save" the (relatively) smallish sum that I'd save by going that route. I'd rather just get something that's ready to go out of the box, and probably made with slightly better materials and techniques. I'm buying into that latter notion without supporting evidence of any kind, just for the record. Point being: I feel that if I am going down this path, of taking this project on, I'm not going to split hairs over the marginal difference between the cost of the RH brakes versus restoring (to my satisfaction) a set of old Mafacs. In that equation I also factor in the hassle and headache of having to track down the brakes (they aren't THAT common), get them working well and looking good, etc.

I read some other comments here, about parts such as the RH brakes being about "replicating" a particular look & feel -- in this case, low trail type French touring bikes. Personally, I think it's possible to reach into the past and pull forward all the best aspects of what those bikes were, without specifically "replicating" them, just for the sake of having an identical look. I don't like low trail steering, and have no intention of going that way. I'm also not trying to build a museum piece. This will be a practical bike that I will most definitely ride a lot. It will be a modern bike, with a modern design, outfitted with parts that make sense for the types of riding I enjoy. The look and feel is definitely a part of that, for me. There's just *something* about the way it feels to be out on a long ride, and to appreciate the beauty and history of the bike you're on. For me that's a necessary component of the experience, and one for which I'm willing to pay and perhaps even sacrifice a *tiny* little bit of practicality, if I can do so in a way that doesn't overall detract from the function of the bike as a whole, and it adds in a meaningful way to the way the bike feels (to me).

All that said: I'm taking a deep breath in before I take this plunge. If I hate the brakes, it's going to be heartbreaking, because I'll have paid a LOT for a custom frame that can accept NO other brakes, period. So I am absolutely banking on this working out. So I don't necessarily recommend anyone apply my personal POV on this. I only want to state why, to some, there may be considerations that go beyond the scope of money vs. performance (as silly as that may seem).
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Old 03-11-24, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by mdoleman
I'm quite late to the party, here, but thought I would throw-in my perspective, since I think I'm about to pull the trigger on a set of the RH brakes, along with the front rack which is designed to go with them. It's a lot of money to pay, and I'm hesitant/cognizant, on that score, for sure.

In my case, I'm having (another) custom frame built, and this one I want to be a very classically-styled randonneuse type affair. I have other bikes for other types of riding, and this one I want to be very singularly unique. The direct-mount center pull brakes seem like the way to go, and here's how I came to that conclusion:

* I could go with cantilever brakes, but I already have a bike with cantilevers. The new bike won't ever be outfitted with tires >38mm, for "mostly road" type riding. So cantilevers brakes aren't really "needed" for tire clearance.
* I could easily go with plain-'ol side-pull calipers, but I definitely want a front rack, and there just aren't many lightweight, nice looking options that pair-up with a center-mounted, side-pull caliper brake.
* There is the Paul Racer, which I think is a great option, but to my eye it's a bit fugly, more expensive, and -- again -- won't play nice with any rack that I know of.

As per all the observations about simply grabbing a set of Mafac RAIDs: sure, I totally agree. Basically the same brake. As much as I do enjoy tinkering endlessly on bikes and parts, I don't need to "save" the (relatively) smallish sum that I'd save by going that route. I'd rather just get something that's ready to go out of the box, and probably made with slightly better materials and techniques. I'm buying into that latter notion without supporting evidence of any kind, just for the record. Point being: I feel that if I am going down this path, of taking this project on, I'm not going to split hairs over the marginal difference between the cost of the RH brakes versus restoring (to my satisfaction) a set of old Mafacs. In that equation I also factor in the hassle and headache of having to track down the brakes (they aren't THAT common), get them working well and looking good, etc.

I read some other comments here, about parts such as the RH brakes being about "replicating" a particular look & feel -- in this case, low trail type French touring bikes. Personally, I think it's possible to reach into the past and pull forward all the best aspects of what those bikes were, without specifically "replicating" them, just for the sake of having an identical look. I don't like low trail steering, and have no intention of going that way. I'm also not trying to build a museum piece. This will be a practical bike that I will most definitely ride a lot. It will be a modern bike, with a modern design, outfitted with parts that make sense for the types of riding I enjoy. The look and feel is definitely a part of that, for me. There's just *something* about the way it feels to be out on a long ride, and to appreciate the beauty and history of the bike you're on. For me that's a necessary component of the experience, and one for which I'm willing to pay and perhaps even sacrifice a *tiny* little bit of practicality, if I can do so in a way that doesn't overall detract from the function of the bike as a whole, and it adds in a meaningful way to the way the bike feels (to me).

All that said: I'm taking a deep breath in before I take this plunge. If I hate the brakes, it's going to be heartbreaking, because I'll have paid a LOT for a custom frame that can accept NO other brakes, period. So I am absolutely banking on this working out. So I don't necessarily recommend anyone apply my personal POV on this. I only want to state why, to some, there may be considerations that go beyond the scope of money vs. performance (as silly as that may seem).


Oh yes, I fully understand your point !
If you watch my other posts, you’ll see that I’m a big fan of ATB / all purpose bikes and especially those with u-brakes front and rear.
But I love the look of the classical randonneurs with centerpulls. For me, they’re esthetically the most pleasing and versatile bikes.

Like you, I’ve decided to build myself a custom frame with these Mafac type centerpulls. I really love the fact that you can mount front racks that just add to the amazing esthetics.

So, please keep us posted on your custom build !
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