Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Steel is Real.. Explain?

Old 05-22-19, 12:57 PM
  #176  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,517

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2637 Post(s)
Liked 173 Times in 129 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
You dont find Cdale's claim to be invalid? What?!?! Find me an equivalent bike to the 2.8 model from that era with a frame that weighs anything close to 8#. I can save you time- you wont find one because one doesnt exist. It there is one from that era, then it isnt equivalent in level to the 2.8 so it isnt comparable.
I actually provided a real example that is an equivalent frame in steel, and its actually on the heavy side due to size difference, but it still isnt even close to the claimed 8#. Yet you dont find their claim to be invalid.

You look at data all day and clearly thrive on accuracy...except for this instance.
You gave one example. Thatís not ďdataĒ. I have no idea what the cost of the bike you are comparing nor if it was a custom or production model. I do know there were a lot of production steel bikes back in the early 90s and most of them were rather heavy. Cannondale had something to compare their bikes to and we donít know what they were using as a comparison.

Steel bikes are heavier than aluminum bikes, that is a given. Lightweight aluminum bikes are cheaper than lightweight steel bikes which is why there arenít that many lightweight steel bikes in shops now. Aluminum put a nail in steelís coffin and carbon is pounding on the nails for aluminum. The only reasons that carbon hasnít taken over the market is that itís not cheap enough. People are working on that.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 05-22-19, 01:59 PM
  #177  
rosefarts
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 736
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 304 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 58 Times in 27 Posts
I found a low end Peugeot in the alley behind my house with a sign that said ďfree to a good homeĒ.

This was from the 70s or 80s and was their beater model. Not their high end race models.

I stripped it and repainted it, did as fine a job as a rattle can can do. Anyway, it was a 6lb frame stripped down. The fork was 800gm. Not light and low end. Never intended to be anywhere near C-dales flagship. And it was still lighter than the claim.

Unless you went out of your way to add extra metal to the bike (like those looong cargo things), I doubt you can get up to 8lbs for a frame.
rosefarts is offline  
Old 05-22-19, 02:52 PM
  #178  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 8,840

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo, '18 Diamondback Syncr

Mentioned: 78 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3259 Post(s)
Liked 322 Times in 223 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
You gave one example. Thatís not ďdataĒ. I have no idea what the cost of the bike you are comparing nor if it was a custom or production model. I do know there were a lot of production steel bikes back in the early 90s and most of them were rather heavy. Cannondale had something to compare their bikes to and we donít know what they were using as a comparison.

Steel bikes are heavier than aluminum bikes, that is a given. Lightweight aluminum bikes are cheaper than lightweight steel bikes which is why there arenít that many lightweight steel bikes in shops now. Aluminum put a nail in steelís coffin and carbon is pounding on the nails for aluminum. The only reasons that carbon hasnít taken over the market is that itís not cheap enough. People are working on that.
I gave one example that is actually heavier than what Cdale should have used to compare. As mentioned, its a Tange 1 frame which at the time was nice, but not the highest level steel by any means. Its basically a Centurion Ironman road bike- just a production lugged road frame.
Yes it was just 1 example, but Cdale's claim is completely unfounded to anyone with any knowledge of frame weights and there should not be a need to provide more examples since the one I did provide shows common steel frames of equal quality bikes were lighter.

Here, ill list more that are significantly less than 8 pounds and were all production steel that were from mid-level to upper-level bikes.
- '87 Miyata 912 road bike
- '87 Schwinn Prelude road bike
- '89 Novara Trionfo road bike
- '89 Ironman Expert road bike
- '91 Diamondback Expert TG road bike
- '90 Fuji Saratoga touring bike
- '88 Schwinn Premis road bike

Those are all bikes from the same era that are production made, use quality but not even highest quality steel tubing, and weigh about 5# or less even in the largest common size(63cm, 64c, 25")


You have nothing to support Cannondale's claim, yet you dont find it to be invalid?...why do you find it valid to begin with?
I would honestly be interested to find out what equivalent steel road bike in '92 could have had a frame that weighed 8 pounds.
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 05-22-19, 03:04 PM
  #179  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,888
Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1284 Post(s)
Liked 91 Times in 60 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
I would honestly be interested to find out what equivalent steel road bike in '92 could have had a frame that weighed 8 pounds.
Maybe Cannondale considered their bicycles to be functionally equivalent to Schwinn Varsities.
HTupolev is online now  
Old 05-22-19, 03:15 PM
  #180  
Rollfast
What happened?
 
Rollfast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Around here somewhere
Posts: 7,747

Bikes: 3 Rollfasts, 3 Schwinns, a Shelby and a Higgins Flightliner in a pear tree!

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1672 Post(s)
Liked 135 Times in 120 Posts
I have a 1946 Shelby Traveler that was incredibly light without fenders and such.
__________________

Our streets are paved with onions...the drivers aren't tarping
Rollfast is offline  
Old 05-22-19, 03:24 PM
  #181  
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 11,460

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 137 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5465 Post(s)
Liked 118 Times in 79 Posts
Riding is real.

Then there is typing, which judging from what I see here consumes more hours of many BF members' days than riding.

I had a Schwinn Suburban for many, many years .... rode it with flat bars, had it converted to drops bars, rode it a lot more. It weighed, I believe, 46 pounds---back when bikes included pedals. Could its frame and fork have weight eight pounds?

Who Freaking Cares?

It was a beast though. No one who ever tried to move it would try to say it wasn't real.

And of course ... i have the Ultimate Answer for All these nonsense threads---

My favorite color is faster than yours, and sounds better.
Maelochs is offline  
Old 05-22-19, 03:56 PM
  #182  
63rickert
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 1,142
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 525 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 38 Times in 32 Posts
Just weighed the 1950 Bates. The FB hubs on that bike are 1930s. Took off the pump and water bottle. Bottle cage still on it. Pedals and clips and straps. Brooks B.15N Swallow saddle. Steel cranks. Weight was 21.6 pounds. That bike has a unique feature no one has replicated. The Diadrant fork. Reynolds 531 steel with two bends instead of just the one. In static testing that I am not afraid to perform on a fork and frame that is 69 years old about 20mm of travel in that 700 gram fork. So same travel as a Lauf fork but with no moving pieces and a lot less weight. And wonderful steering precision on a fork with lots of travel. That bike started as $200 and with paint job, tubulars, lots of replaced NOS parts still under $1000.

Never weighed the Bates as a bare frame, did weigh the 1958 Rivetts. 23-1/2" frame with 23" top tube, long Campy ends, long stays, paint, fancy lugs. The number was right on 1800 grams, so a touch under 4 pounds.

Yes, factory frames are heavy. So what.

Carbon frames can be built real near 600 grams and if someone has hit that magic number no surprise. Trying that hard with steel gets you to 1000grams. 1100 gram frames happen somewhat routinely with heat treated steel and tig welding. With most any build where weight is one of the considerations steel frames are now around 1500grams. Twenty year ago had a Gunnar Sport w/no special features under 1600. While carbon frames built to the limit can get close to 600, real frames are no place close to that. Plenty of $3K carbon frames are over 1000grams.
63rickert is offline  
Old 05-22-19, 04:08 PM
  #183  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 14,784

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 233 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6822 Post(s)
Liked 649 Times in 407 Posts
Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Who Freaking Cares?
Are you over 50?

The older I get the less I care



-Tim-

Last edited by TimothyH; 05-22-19 at 04:15 PM.
TimothyH is offline  
Likes For TimothyH:
Old 05-22-19, 04:24 PM
  #184  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 8,840

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '87 Schwinn Prelude, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo, '18 Diamondback Syncr

Mentioned: 78 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3259 Post(s)
Liked 322 Times in 223 Posts
Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Riding is real.

Then there is typing, which judging from what I see here consumes more hours of many BF members' days than riding.
mstateglfr is offline  
Likes For mstateglfr:
Old 05-22-19, 04:31 PM
  #185  
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 11,460

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 137 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5465 Post(s)
Liked 118 Times in 79 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
I am a BF member in good standing, thank you very much.
Maelochs is offline  
Old 05-22-19, 05:05 PM
  #186  
Reynolds 
Passista
 
Reynolds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 6,660

Bikes: 1998 Pinarello Asolo, 1992 KHS MontaŮa pro, 1980 Raleigh DL-1, IGH Hybrid, IGH Utility

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 478 Post(s)
Liked 42 Times in 32 Posts
My '98 Pinarello frame and fork weigh 2700 grams or less than 6 lbs, and this is not a top of the line frame.

Last edited by Reynolds; 05-22-19 at 07:59 PM.
Reynolds is offline  
Old 05-22-19, 05:25 PM
  #187  
Kedosto
Ambulophobic
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Leandro, CA
Posts: 1,169
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 445 Post(s)
Liked 135 Times in 83 Posts
I wouldn’t touch a frame material thread with a ten foot pole. I will, however, use my eleven foot pole to advance this clarification re: the seemingly ridiculous C’dale “8 lb frame” claim.

C’dale was claiming that a frame made of steel using the same dimensions - tubing lengths AND diameters - would weigh about 8 lbs. Which, while true, is clearly an “apples to oranges” comparison. There is no reason anyone would need to build a steel bicycle frame with tubing diameters comparable to aluminum.

Context is important here. Aluminum was an emerging frame material and to veteran cyclists a bit of education was in order. Large, oversized tubing was required to provide comparable strength, but the look of such oversized tubes gave the impression of oversized weight. C’dale was trying to explain strength, tubing size, and weight to an audience mostly ignorant of the realities.

So it’s true that an exact matching frame made of steel would weigh 8 lbs, but no such frame has ever existed.


-Kedosto
*donning flame resistant suit*
Kedosto is offline  
Likes For Kedosto:
Old 05-22-19, 08:20 PM
  #188  
Loose Chain
Senior Member
 
Loose Chain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 2,071

Bikes: 84 Pinarello Trevisio, 86 Guerciotti SLX, 96 Specialized Stumpjumper, 2010 Surly Cross Check, 88 Centurion Prestige, 73 Raleigh Sports, GT Force, Bridgestone MB4

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 278 Post(s)
Liked 62 Times in 49 Posts
You know, most of the riders of these high-zoot CF Gi-trek-alized China bicycles, their bicycles are, maybe, at very best, a couple of pounds lighter than a steel bicycle, but themselves are typically at least 50 pounds body mass heavier than me at the same approximate height and while their cardio-aerobic engine might be better than mine (now that I am 65 yo), maybe, might be stronger than me, maybe, but subtract that two pounds and I still have a 48 pound advantage over them. Hades, subtract, five pounds, I still have a 45 pound advantage over the typcial guy I see on these things. And, even, if we were the same body mass, is that bicycle weight difference going to really matter anywhwere but climbing straight up a mountain. Just saying, I am rarely last, against people half my age.

Last edited by Loose Chain; 05-22-19 at 08:25 PM.
Loose Chain is offline  
Old 05-22-19, 08:55 PM
  #189  
Happy Feet
Senior Member
 
Happy Feet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,494
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1368 Post(s)
Liked 240 Times in 147 Posts
How to discuss this topic like a rapper. This is official Dad humour material to drive your teenagers crazy.

Take the hard sound of the word - in this case "eel". Run it through the alphabet abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz to make up some words. Feel, Real, Zeal... then make a story out of them.
Bust some rhymes over dinner for full effect.

So here's the deal.
Steel.
Gotta a smooth kinda feel,
a groovy C&V appeal -
like classic Swayze and J Beal.
Old school roadies keep it real,
maybe with some zeal.
And,
to seal..
the deal..
and end this speel..
in a crash it's easier to heal.

Word.

Granted, it's a lot harder to do that with Aluminum.

Last edited by Happy Feet; 05-22-19 at 08:59 PM.
Happy Feet is offline  
Old 05-22-19, 10:47 PM
  #190  
SoreFeet
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,109
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
In propery english I have to say steel frames are more funner than carbon.

Vintage frames of all types exist, lot's never ridden and in pristine shape. Mixing and matching old parts to get a nice functional bike is much less money than buying a brand new bike.

The good old steel frames feel like wet noodles and flexy, they lively feel of a well aligned frame can track the road good. Premium steel frames are a very good niche.

Older threaded bottom brackets are a lot easier to service than than this press fit BB standard going on...much less hassle.

I'd rather have an old steel jalopy because I enjoy riding them with various components. They are a hobbyist machine that have so many options.

Standardized Carbon frames with disc brakes have come a long way. But you can't beat the utility of a good steel frame commuter bike.
SoreFeet is offline  
Old 05-22-19, 11:09 PM
  #191  
elcruxio
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 1,837

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 331 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Well on the commuting thing. I'm currently saving up for a carbon framed fat bike which will serve in large part as a commuter and specifically a winter commuter. The fat bike is obvious for winter commuting because well, some days no other bike can crawl through the snow.
But the reasoning behind the carbon frame is in the extensive salt usage of certain cities in Finland. Carbon doesn't corrode. However we have had several examples of steel and aluminum frames getting chewed through by salt corrosion. At the moment carbon is getting pretty darn affordable and mountain bike carbon is the most durable mountain bike material out there.

As for non salty environtments, it doesn't much matter which material the frame is made of. It'd be a marathon effort to corrode a chromoly frame through with just rainwater.
elcruxio is offline  
Likes For elcruxio:
Old 05-23-19, 09:09 AM
  #192  
satrain18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 62
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by SoreFeet View Post
In propery english I have to say steel frames are more funner than carbon.
...which is subjective.

Originally Posted by SoreFeet View Post
Vintage frames of all types exist, lot's never ridden and in pristine shape. Mixing and matching old parts to get a nice functional bike is much less money than buying a brand new bike.
...which gets fewer and fewer as time progresses.

Originally Posted by SoreFeet View Post
The good old steel frames feel like wet noodles and flexy, they lively feel of a well aligned frame can track the road good. Premium steel frames are a very good niche.
Carbon fiber can and have compliance. It's determined by the layup and the geometry. Endurance geometry carbon frames do exist.

Originally Posted by SoreFeet View Post
Older threaded bottom brackets are a lot easier to service than than this press fit BB standard going on...much less hassle.
Ever heard of BBInfinite?
Know anybody who has a $632 bottom bracket facing and tapping set in their home garage?

Originally Posted by SoreFeet View Post
I'd rather have an old steel jalopy because I enjoy riding them with various components. They are a hobbyist machine that have so many options.
...which is, again, subjective.

Originally Posted by SoreFeet View Post
Standardized Carbon frames with disc brakes have come a long way. But you can't beat the utility of a good steel frame commuter bike.
...which is heavy, considering it is a commuter bike.
satrain18 is offline  
Old 05-23-19, 10:32 AM
  #193  
elcruxio
Senior Member
 
elcruxio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Turku, Finland, Europe
Posts: 1,837

Bikes: 2011 Specialized crux comp, 2013 Specialized Rockhopper Pro

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 331 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by satrain18 View Post
Ok so what that test is telling me is that the BBInfinite bearings may actually be really, really bad. There are these chinese bearing marketing videos where they show how a Chinese "superior" bearing spins for minutes where as a German "inferior" bearing doesn't spin freely at all.
But that's of course not how bearings work. You can't test bearing quality on how long it spins with no load. But generally speaking the one that spins longer or "better" is likely to be the inferior one, because it doesn't have grease or has too little grease or is too loose.

On the other hand, I've had my fair share of press fit bottom brackets as well as threaded. The threaded ones are just easier to deal with. This coming from a touring cyclist who has had to replace a bottom bracket bearing on the road.
I believe press fit works just as well as threaded bottom brackets but they are much more labor intensive, require more tools (which are also more expensive) and requires chemicals that are way more expensive than plain ol' grease (loctite 600-series bearing retaining compound)
The carbon frame I'm looking at does have a threaded bottom bracket. I'd think really hard whether I'd want a press fit one, because then I'd have to invest a sizeable amount on tools again.

Know anybody who has a $632 bottom bracket facing and tapping set in their home garage?
Me and my wife have owned 13 bikes, some of them built from bought frames. We've never needed a bottom bracket facing or tapping set.
If we did, we'd bring the frame to an LBS that could do it for us. And like head tube facing it's a one time job. Doesn't need to be repeated. Usually good quality frames are faced at the factory. Paint can get in the way though so "facing" can be done with a razor blade or sanding paper. Tapping then is another issue, but never had to do that until now.
elcruxio is offline  
Old 05-23-19, 10:44 AM
  #194  
livedarklions
Cyclesomatic
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 4,658

Bikes: Trek FX 3; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Motobecane Fantom CX; Giant OCR A1

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2365 Post(s)
Liked 746 Times in 460 Posts
Originally Posted by satrain18 View Post
...which is subjective.


...which gets fewer and fewer as time progresses.


Carbon fiber can and have compliance. It's determined by the layup and the geometry. Endurance geometry carbon frames do exist.


Ever heard of BBInfinite? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpsCpp8YlnM
Know anybody who has a $632 bottom bracket facing and tapping set in their home garage?


...which is, again, subjective.


...which is heavy, considering it is a commuter bike.
When somebody states their taste preferences, pointing out that their preferences are subjective is pretty silly. Pretty much a "water is wet" statement.
livedarklions is offline  
Old 05-23-19, 11:17 AM
  #195  
satrain18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 62
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
https://wheelsmfg.com/bottom-brackets.html
satrain18 is offline  
Old 05-23-19, 12:49 PM
  #196  
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 11,460

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 137 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5465 Post(s)
Liked 118 Times in 79 Posts
Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
When somebody states their taste preferences, pointing out that their preferences are subjective is pretty silly. Pretty much a "water is wet" statement.
When people state their preferences as fact, it is necessary to point out that they are merely opinions ... IMO.

I convert all my press-fits to Wheels angular bearings. They are heavier than press-fits but I figure I can rely on them and replace them ... more so than with press-fits.

However, press-fit seems to have overcome most of its initial issues with poor fit, varying rates of expansion, etc. and ar no as reliable as any other BB standard, while being both stronger and lighter than most.
Maelochs is offline  
Likes For Maelochs:
Old 05-23-19, 01:17 PM
  #197  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 23,486
Mentioned: 175 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9225 Post(s)
Liked 796 Times in 498 Posts
Ti is fly

*mic drop*
indyfabz is offline  
Old 05-23-19, 02:23 PM
  #198  
livedarklions
Cyclesomatic
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 4,658

Bikes: Trek FX 3; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Motobecane Fantom CX; Giant OCR A1

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2365 Post(s)
Liked 746 Times in 460 Posts
Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
When people state their preferences as fact, it is necessary to point out that they are merely opinions ... IMO.

I convert all my press-fits to Wheels angular bearings. They are heavier than press-fits but I figure I can rely on them and replace them ... more so than with press-fits.

However, press-fit seems to have overcome most of its initial issues with poor fit, varying rates of expansion, etc. and ar no as reliable as any other BB standard, while being both stronger and lighter than most.


The statements that were labeled as subjective (and I paraphrase) were "Steel is funner" and "I'd rather have...."
It was not at all a matter of contest that those are subjective opinions.


I have absolutely nothing of interest to say about bearings because I know nothing about the subject, but those were not the statements that were labelled as "subjective".
livedarklions is offline  
Old 05-23-19, 08:50 PM
  #199  
Dr.Lou
Senior Member
 
Dr.Lou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 212
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 42 Posts
Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
By the way, chocolate is inherently better than vanilla. Anyone who prefers vanilla is a moron.

and one point of information -- if you really don't want an assplosion, avoid mannitol ice cream and candy.
or Mountain House Chili Mac. I've read that Pearl Izumis are rated for a level 4 assplosion, butt it's still not pretty.
Dr.Lou is offline  
Old 05-24-19, 05:16 AM
  #200  
bruce19
Senior Member
 
bruce19's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lebanon (Liberty Hill), CT
Posts: 6,535

Bikes: CAAD 12, MASI Gran Criterium S, Colnago World Cup CX & Guru steel

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 958 Post(s)
Liked 163 Times in 104 Posts
Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
By the way, chocolate is inherently better than vanilla. Anyone who prefers vanilla is a moron.
.
Now you've done it. People who like vanilla appreciate subtlety, poetry and music. Those who like chocolate need to have their senses assaulted in order for anything to get through.
bruce19 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.