Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Tires for THIS gravel...

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Tires for THIS gravel...

Old 05-29-19, 01:46 PM
  #1  
Almost 50 - Momma to Many
Thread Starter
 
hadassah's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Missouri
Posts: 44

Bikes: Trek Skye S

Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
Tires for THIS gravel...


I hope this photo doesn't upload as big as it looks on my end. I broke my leg last June on my first ride out on my Trek Marlin... You all helped me realize it was too high of a PSI. I have recently got new tires... Hillbilly Grip. If you look them up, they are just knobby and pretty aggressive. I've read that they are great for mud but squirrely on gravel... yes, they are right. I'm considering getting some other tires instead as this is the type of gravel I ride on daily. I really need some stability, am willing to take some classes too as I know it's not all about tires, but am wondering what would be good on this type of gravel/rock. WTB Riddler Maybe? Anyone else ride on this stuff? Thanks a bunch. By the way I was 215 lbs last year from 245, when I broke my leg, now in the 160's and rode 34 miles one day a couple weeks ago. Average 20 miles on this gravel daily.
hadassah is offline  
Likes For hadassah:
Old 05-29-19, 02:18 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
tyrion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 4,076

Bikes: Velo Orange Piolet

Liked 2,012 Times in 972 Posts
I'd get the fattest file-tred or small-knob that will fit on your bike. But it will still be kind of slippery on that gravel - I think there's no getting around that.
tyrion is offline  
Likes For tyrion:
Old 05-29-19, 02:23 PM
  #3  
I'm the anecdote.
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: S.E. Texas
Posts: 1,821

Bikes: '12 Schwinn, '13 Norco

Liked 1,176 Times in 795 Posts
That kind of gravel is meant for something fast and with suspension. Something that can essentially ski and slide across it while maintaining control. Something with a motor.
FiftySix is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 02:44 PM
  #4  
Lopsided biped
 
rollagain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 740

Bikes: 2017 Day 6 Cyclone (the Buick); 2015 Simcoe Deluxe (the Xebec); Street Strider 3i (the not-a-bike); GreenSpeed Anura (the Black Swan)

Liked 161 Times in 98 Posts
If it were me, I'd start by putting more than two wheels under me, and iron out the tire selection later.
rollagain is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 02:51 PM
  #5  
Almost 50 - Momma to Many
Thread Starter
 
hadassah's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Missouri
Posts: 44

Bikes: Trek Skye S

Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
Well, it's what I got around here. It's not always like this on every mile I ride but I do need something that might work better than my current tires for this. I rode it today with no problems, I just can't go fast and I'm okay with that. : )
hadassah is offline  
Likes For hadassah:
Old 05-29-19, 02:55 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 9,045

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Liked 2,047 Times in 1,269 Posts
I'm not sure how long the OP has been riding 20 miles/day on this stuff, but with 2" tires (or there about), I'd think riding this gravel would be a case of rider skill more than equipment. I don't see many potholes in the picture, so I'd guess your could drop the pressure fairly far down (30-40 psi, perhaps?). But if I regularly had to ride 20 miles on a road that rough, I might be looking for a clown bike that takes 3-4" tires and can be inflated by puffing into the tube.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 03:00 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South shore, L.I., NY
Posts: 7,174

Bikes: Flyxii FR322, Cannondale Topstone, Miyata City Liner, Specialized Chisel, Specialized Epic Evo

Liked 2,264 Times in 1,287 Posts
For gravel and dirt roads I like a tire that is only light knobby or almost slick in center but has bigger knobs on the side. Let’s it roll quicker yet grips in turns.

The WTB might work fine though, just find the largest tire that’ll fit the bike. Just note that you’d be spending near or over $100 on tires for a $500 - $600 bike ? Not sure I’d be spending that, I’d rather save up for a better bike.
Steve B. is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 03:59 PM
  #8  
WALSTIB
 
hillyman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 1,798
Liked 384 Times in 183 Posts
I grew up on gravel roads and was a happy man when the mountain bike came out. I don't think there's much more you can do than what you've got on a loose surface. But you will develop wicked bike handling skills. I'd just get the good out of what you already have. And I kinda like the name Hillbilly Grip.
__________________
www.bikeleague.org

hillyman is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 04:40 PM
  #9  
Full Member
 
mixteup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: NW Florida
Posts: 389

Bikes: A Few

Liked 63 Times in 27 Posts
https://www.amazon.com/Triple-Saver-...gateway&sr=8-4
mixteup is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 04:48 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
u235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 1,185
Liked 133 Times in 86 Posts
I don't see that being that bad. It's no rail trail crushed but still medium/random sized gravel 30-40% coverage spread over a fine hard base that looks relatively compact. No potholes, washout, relatively consistent and no rollercoaster bumps. Worse would be several inches of fresh loose gravel or if the whole thing was medium/large pieces of various random depth. My last three gravel tires were Speedride 42, Hutchinson Overide 40 and Riddler 45. Maybe I'm wrong but I've ridden all kinds of gravel and surfaces and would use any of the three here depending on if there was a asphalt involved. I'm sure there would be some pings and shooting rocks from the tires. It's gravel, not asphalt so adjust accordingly.

Last edited by u235; 05-29-19 at 05:30 PM.
u235 is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 04:58 PM
  #11  
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Folsom CA
Posts: 13,476

Bikes: Stormchaser, Paramount, Tilt, Samba tandem

Liked 2,125 Times in 1,384 Posts
The best bicycle for that road

__________________
Genesis 49:16-17
Darth Lefty is offline  
Likes For Darth Lefty:
Old 05-29-19, 05:03 PM
  #12  
Occam's Rotor
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 7,248
Liked 2,331 Times in 1,164 Posts
I ride stuff like that with 38mm tires. The key is to keep the pressure as low as you can get away with, without damaging the rims or getting pinch flats. Find the widest tires you can fit on the bike, and if your rims allow tubeless, get tubeless tires set up. This will allow you to ride with really low tire pressure. The tires will mold around the rocks and gravel rather than ping off them.

BTW congratulations on the weight loss. That is extremely impressive.
Cyclist0108 is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 05:50 PM
  #13  
Almost 50 - Momma to Many
Thread Starter
 
hadassah's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Missouri
Posts: 44

Bikes: Trek Skye S

Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Darth Lefty
The best bicycle for that road

I like it!!!
hadassah is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 06:21 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
freeranger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 2,647

Bikes: 06 Lemond Reno, 98 GT Timberline mtn.bike

Liked 756 Times in 465 Posts
I ride mostly paved surfaces now, but used to almost exclusively ride off-road, and the tire I liked was the Kenda Nevegal (on a mtn.bike). Pretty sure they would handle that.

https://www.biketiresdirect.com/sear...enda%20Nevegal

Last edited by freeranger; 05-29-19 at 06:28 PM.
freeranger is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 06:23 PM
  #15  
Almost 50 - Momma to Many
Thread Starter
 
hadassah's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Missouri
Posts: 44

Bikes: Trek Skye S

Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by u235
I don't see that being that bad. It's no rail trail crushed but still medium/random sized gravel 30-40% coverage spread over a fine hard base that looks relatively compact. No potholes, washout, relatively consistent and no rollercoaster bumps. Worse would be several inches of fresh loose gravel or if the whole thing was medium/large pieces of various random depth. My last three gravel tires were Speedride 42, Hutchinson Overide 40 and Riddler 45. Maybe I'm wrong but I've ridden all kinds of gravel and surfaces and would use any of the three here depending on if there was a asphalt involved. I'm sure there would be some pings and shooting rocks from the tires. It's gravel, not asphalt so adjust accordingly.
Thank you so much, I am looking up those three tires. It won't hurt to at least try. It seems my daughter's tires on her Trek Cruiser seem more stable than mine (on gravel). Thank again, just what I was looking for.
hadassah is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 06:26 PM
  #16  
Almost 50 - Momma to Many
Thread Starter
 
hadassah's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Missouri
Posts: 44

Bikes: Trek Skye S

Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by wgscott
I ride stuff like that with 38mm tires. The key is to keep the pressure as low as you can get away with, without damaging the rims or getting pinch flats. Find the widest tires you can fit on the bike, and if your rims allow tubeless, get tubeless tires set up. This will allow you to ride with really low tire pressure. The tires will mold around the rocks and gravel rather than ping off them.

BTW congratulations on the weight loss. That is extremely impressive.
Thank you so much. This is just what I needed to hear, I will do this.
hadassah is offline  
Likes For hadassah:
Old 05-29-19, 06:30 PM
  #17  
Almost 50 - Momma to Many
Thread Starter
 
hadassah's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Missouri
Posts: 44

Bikes: Trek Skye S

Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Steve B.
For gravel and dirt roads I like a tire that is only light knobby or almost slick in center but has bigger knobs on the side. Letís it roll quicker yet grips in turns.

The WTB might work fine though, just find the largest tire thatíll fit the bike. Just note that youíd be spending near or over $100 on tires for a $500 - $600 bike ? Not sure Iíd be spending that, Iíd rather save up for a better bike.
I might look into a new bike in a year or so, any suggestions for this type of terrain? Thanks...

Originally Posted by hillyman
I grew up on gravel roads and was a happy man when the mountain bike came out. I don't think there's much more you can do than what you've got on a loose surface. But you will develop wicked bike handling skills. I'd just get the good out of what you already have. And I kinda like the name Hillbilly Grip.
It kind of matches your name!

Yes! : )
hadassah is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 06:45 PM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
u235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 1,185
Liked 133 Times in 86 Posts
Originally Posted by hadassah
Thank you so much, I am looking up those three tires. It won't hurt to at least try. It seems my daughter's tires on her Trek Cruiser seem more stable than mine (on gravel). Thank again, just what I was looking for.
The Hutchinson Overide is a 38c, typo on my part. It actually measures 40 on my 23mm ID wheels and that was what I was thinking. The SpeedRide is from Continental. It is not tubeless capable but a nice conforming tire.
u235 is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 07:31 PM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South shore, L.I., NY
Posts: 7,174

Bikes: Flyxii FR322, Cannondale Topstone, Miyata City Liner, Specialized Chisel, Specialized Epic Evo

Liked 2,264 Times in 1,287 Posts
Originally Posted by hadassah
I might look into a new bike in a year or so, any suggestions for this type of terrain? Thanks...

It kind of matches your name!


Yes! : )
A buddy sold his Kona Rove, purchased a Cannondale Topstone 105. Lighter, great components, takes a 40mm tire which he loves.
Steve B. is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 07:34 PM
  #20  
vespertine member
 
wipekitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Land of Angora, Turkey
Posts: 2,476

Bikes: Yes

Liked 220 Times in 163 Posts
Looks like gravel to me Panaracer Gravel King, Donnelly X'Plor USH, and whatever is made by Bontrager are all popular options for the local Minnesota/Iowa gravel, which is similar to what you've posted.

Do you know what size wheels you have on the bike? That could make a difference in tire availability.

Props to you for doing 20 miles a day on that stuff - that is some serious riding!
wipekitty is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 09:52 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Allentown, Pennsylvania
Posts: 780

Bikes: 2018 Lynskey Cooper CX; 2007 Cannondale F4

Liked 155 Times in 64 Posts
Looks like fatbike territory to me.
General Geoff is offline  
Old 05-29-19, 11:32 PM
  #22  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: The Witterings, West Sussex
Posts: 1,066
Liked 37 Times in 29 Posts
You mention WTB Riddlers which are gravel bike tyres .... personally if I were riding 20 miles a day on that sort of surface I'd be looking at wider MTB tyres as opposed to heading towards narrower more gravel orientated tyres mainly because of the comfort / enjoyment factor but also the more volume on that sort of surface chances are you'll go quicker with a wider tyre at lower pressure anyway.

We regularly cover 3 miles out of a 20 to 40 mile ride on a similar but maybe not quite so consistently punishing surface and whilst I take my gravel bike with approx 38mm tyres as the rest of the ride is tarmac, if I was doing longer distances on that something like that I'd grab my 29er which I run Smart Sam Plus's on and handle that sort of surface quite well and are still semi OK if you happen to hit some road along the way.

I wonder if you're thinking gravel bikes because of the name are ideal for that sort of surface and so tyres designed for them should be as well but a gravel bike is really a bike that's probably more road orientated and "can handle" some gravel as opposed to excelling at it (and ideally not as aggressive as that) in contrast to a road bike which would be unbearable on that.

Last edited by Witterings; 05-30-19 at 02:44 AM.
Witterings is offline  
Old 05-30-19, 12:13 AM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 13,147

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Liked 4,165 Times in 2,682 Posts
Those roads look like they were made for Paselas, the biggest ones you can run on your bike. I'm running 38c in front and 35c in back. I could go a lot bigger in front but 35 is the max in back. They've been great on roads nowhere near as nice as that your photo and on steep grades.
79pmooney is offline  
Old 05-30-19, 12:53 AM
  #24  
Life Feeds On Life
 
Hondo Gravel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Hondo,Texas
Posts: 2,151

Bikes: Too many Motobecanes

Liked 4,673 Times in 3,123 Posts
IMHO the 29er MTB with front suspension. Nice smooth ride, no problems.
Hondo Gravel is online now  
Likes For Hondo Gravel:
Old 05-30-19, 05:21 AM
  #25  
Full Member
 
mixteup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: NW Florida
Posts: 389

Bikes: A Few

Liked 63 Times in 27 Posts
Originally Posted by General Geoff
Looks like fatbike territory to me.
I like this idea - I don't imagine you'd have one of those babies slide out from under you !
And just think of the workout
mixteup is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.