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How long does it take you to fix a flat?

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How long does it take you to fix a flat?

Old 05-31-19, 02:54 AM
  #26  
Teamprovicycle
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I have tubeless diapers I just poop my pants and keep going
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Old 05-31-19, 04:45 AM
  #27  
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Most of my flats are radial tire wire. Unless it is all big, I insert a new tube, inflate, and so any patches at home. Under 10, unless in the rain or adverse conditions. Even so, my repair at home is about 15 minutes using a repair stand to make it easier.
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Old 05-31-19, 05:13 AM
  #28  
Jim from Boston
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How long does it take you to fix a flat?
Originally Posted by General Geoff View Post
Having gotten two flats on my rear tire in a week's time, I've found it takes me about 20-25 minutes at a liesurely pace to:…
Originally Posted by Ghazmh View Post
It seems like most of my flats are in pouring rain or when it’s 42 degrees and raining. It’s basically a race for me. I prefer to replace the tube and patch it at home. Say 10ish minutes.
Originally Posted by caloso View Post
My experience is that the first flat gets a new tube and CO2. This will be less than 5 minutes. I prefer not to patch a tube on the side of the road if I can avoid it. The second and subsequent flats get a patch and pump.

At this point, I'm probably late anyway.
I carry two new tubes on a long ride, and I never seem to get around to patching flats though I do carry a patch kit for the worst circumstances.

As a year-round cycle commuter, time to fix is often critical, especially in the Winter.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Emergency Winter Cycling Kit?

I too ride on urban / suburban routes with similar measures, but early, before 6 AM. I envision going to an indoor ATM machine to fix a flat, so I carry a bank card too.
And
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I have on occasion had nightmares about ABSOLUTELY needing to be at work at 7:30 AM, and being nowhere near there.

Rarely in reality I have found myself in that situation, but had more leeway than in my nightmares....
I also employ this preventative measure,to hopefully forestall flats, especially because as @FlMTNdude noted
Originally Posted by FlMTNdude View Post
Most of my flats are radial tire wire...
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
PS: I also use Kevlar tire liners year round, even on my fair weather carbon fiber road bike,
So replacing the floppy tire liner after a repair adds a few minutes.

BTW, just a few minutes ago I posted about living through a flat-tire horror story:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I just posted this PM yesterday about our cross-country tour on Merciers with fully loaded panniers in 1977:..

Back in' 72, I think it was a pretty high quality bike, costing ~$250 at that time, but we did not get a top of the line model, i.e. not Campagnolo equipped. They did have sew-up tires and we actually used the bikes for touring pretty well in Michigan and Ontario.

We then used them to ride cross country and the sew up tires we're the worst part of the trip due to an excessive number of flats, the difficulty of repair, and the need to take a couple days off to find a city with a shop that sold them, but we made it.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…When we did our cross-country honeymoon, we brought six spare tires. It seemed we would get a flat tire about every three days, just as the sticky glue-grime wore off our hands.

Twice on the tour we had to ditch the bikes in a motel and hitchhike to a city to buy more tires (in Flagstaff, AZ and Pueblo, CO), losing two otherwise rest days, plus all the delays and time expended fixing flats.

We switched wheels soon after arriving in Boston.
Back in '77 it was a lot harder to get good information--no Internet!

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 05-31-19 at 11:25 AM. Reason: added quote about ATMs
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Old 05-31-19, 05:26 AM
  #29  
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How many ever have another rider come to a complete stop to offer any kind of assistance? Or is it a quick drive-by "You OK?"

In the U.S. we typically call it a "flat" and in Europe its a "puncture".
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Old 05-31-19, 05:46 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
How many ever have another rider come to a complete stop to offer any kind of assistance? Or is it a quick drive-by "You OK?"
Never, not counting people I ride with - but then again, I usually ride where there are no other riders whatsoever.

In the U.S. we typically call it a "flat" and in Europe its a "puncture".
Technically, there can be other reasons for a flat tire than puncture - a faulty valve, for example. I have had holes in the tire where the inner tube squeezes out and wears a hole against road surface - I'm not sure if that classifies as puncture either.
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Old 05-31-19, 06:00 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by General Geoff View Post
Having gotten two flats on my rear tire in a week's time, I've found it takes me about 20-25 minutes at a liesurely pace

I've read on here before that a seasoned cyclist can replace or patch a tube in less than 10 minutes, but outside a race, I just don't see the benefit in rushing when you might botch something and end up with an unsuccessful repair. What are your experiences?
Don't know, I've never timed myself. It depends on the circumstances. If the item causing the puncture is obvious, and I'm on the road, good weather and good lighting, it is probably less than 20 min. If it is one of those annoying little fragments of wire that you pick up that are practically invisible, or if the item falls out when pulling the tube and I have to search several times to be sure it is gone, or if its dark and raining and my glasses are fogging up, then it could take more than 20 min. If I'm home, after I drop the wheel and pull the tire I may take the time to inspect the rim, look at the dropouts, etc. which could take a lot longer than 20 min. It's better to take the time to do it right than to rush trying to meet some arbitrary standard.

As for patching - I use replacement tubes until I run out, then I patch a bunch all at one time and put them back in rotation.
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Old 05-31-19, 06:12 AM
  #32  
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Never timed it, but not very long-I carry a spare tube, tire levers, and a CO2 inflator. Also a patch kit. This thread has me wondering if something like this exists--I have used round insulating foam at times around the house. Why couldn't a denser version be made that could be inserted into a bike tire, as a quick temporary fix to get you home?
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Old 05-31-19, 06:13 AM
  #33  
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I only carry one tube, and a patch kit, but first flat gets the new tube, and I will repair at home unless I get a second fat which has not yet happened. Takes me about 15 minutes to change the tube. I have a CO2 inflator which works well, and I carry two 16g cartridges.
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Old 05-31-19, 06:19 AM
  #34  
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My old tubeless tires were getting a bit ragged so I picked up a set of 700x28 ones that were a bit more than 28 and rubbed the bike frame. So while I waited for some 700x25 to arrive, I put on some Maxxis Detonators on a set of older rims and rode with them. Two flats in 2 rides. Gaahh!!! Then I remembered why I ride tubeless.
It takes me about 5 minutes to change a flat. I carry 3 tubes typically. Pull one bead loose and flip it over to inspect the inner surface, pull the tube. Put in a new one, pump it up and go.

FWIW. I align the tire labels so that they don't match up with the valve stem. It drives the roadies nuts on group rides.
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Old 05-31-19, 06:23 AM
  #35  
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15 min. did it last night
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Old 05-31-19, 06:45 AM
  #36  
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It was raining on yesterday's ride home, and dinner was waiting, so when I got my first flat in over a year, I just replaced the tube. Seventeen minutes.

BTW, I know I sing the praises of tire liners so what happened was my rear tire had worn a little thin. A small piece of glass worked its way through the tire and eventually found its way around the side of the tire liner. Yes, a tire with a built-in barrier layer wouldn't allow this to happen, but I am happy with my set up, and semi-annual flats are a small price to pay for supple tires that resist most flats with tire liners, than without, or stiffer more puncture resistant tires that ride dull and lifeless.
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Old 05-31-19, 07:05 AM
  #37  
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The last flat I got was during a sprint in a fast group ride, hit a rock during the sprint, but the tire didn't go flat until we were coming to a stop (thankfully!). Since I was towards the front, I was able to get it fixed by the time the end of the group rolled up on us and they didn't really have to wait on me at all. So prob five minutes or less?

Full disclosure, it was the front tire, so that makes it a lil easier, and the tires come off and go back on these wheels very easily, I can roll it on with my hands with no issues, especially when they're warm.
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Old 05-31-19, 07:09 AM
  #38  
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Heh, heh...

Originally Posted by MikeyMK View Post
You take the wheel off...?
Post a video where you change a tube or tire without taking the wheel off.

:-)
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Old 05-31-19, 07:11 AM
  #39  
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On my bike.... 3-5 minutes. On someone else's 15-20 since i'm usually trying to teach them how to do it.
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Old 05-31-19, 07:13 AM
  #40  
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Counting the time it takes for my wife to come and pick me up? Could be a half hour or more
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Old 05-31-19, 07:21 AM
  #41  
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I consider 15 minutes a good time, for me, but not necessarily a good time ...

here's a quickie! but he's not on the side of the road with his gear in a bag, etc. still, very impressive!


then there's this guy who doesn't even get off the bike!


Last edited by rumrunn6; 05-31-19 at 07:27 AM.
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Old 05-31-19, 07:30 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
Post a video where you change a tube or tire without taking the wheel off.
:-)
he may have meant fix a flat, as-in patch a leak


then there's "Sheldon"

& what about this thing!?

Last edited by rumrunn6; 05-31-19 at 07:33 AM.
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Old 05-31-19, 08:20 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Garfield Cat View Post
How many ever have another rider come to a complete stop to offer any kind of assistance? Or is it a quick drive-by "You OK?"

In the U.S. we typically call it a "flat" and in Europe its a "puncture".
I have actually had a modern racer on a carbon bike stop and offer me a tube . I was so impressed by this that I posted a thread on it. I had everything I needed to get myself going, but , after working all day and only couple of miles from my house I decided to call my wife and have her rescue me. I repaired it on the stand. I generally see us roadies offering assistance , but this guy was going the opposite direction and turned around to ask if I wanted a tube A W E S O M E ! Joe joesvintageroadbikes.wordpress
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Old 05-31-19, 08:41 AM
  #44  
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Usually, I can change out a tube in less than 10 minutes. As far as patching a tube, that takes more time, especially if the leak is hard to find.
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Old 05-31-19, 08:45 AM
  #45  
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I don't do patches. Replacing a tube takes me about 15 minutes. I spend a good deal of the time finding the offending object that punctured the tube.
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Old 05-31-19, 08:49 AM
  #46  
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Since most of my riding is commuting, I carry spare tubes (I have different size front/rear). Swap the tubes and go in about 10-15 minutes, just because I don't want to rush and pinch the new tube. I repair the tube later (usually limit tubes to 3-4 patches depending on how close together they are).
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Old 05-31-19, 08:55 AM
  #47  
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One point five minutes.
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Old 05-31-19, 08:59 AM
  #48  
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Usually takes me 10-15 minutes to do it right, just swapping the tube out for repair at home (when I get 5-6 that need it, so the patch kit glue doesn't dry up). The biggest problem is normally finding the d@#! bit of glass or wire that caused the flat. I almost enjoyed a logging staple flat outside Glacier NP -- that one was easy to find!

I can swap the tube faster, of course. Maybe 5 minutes. BUT within 5-10 minutes of that there's usually another flat to deal with, Quicker overall to do it right the first time.
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Old 05-31-19, 09:32 AM
  #49  
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guy on the video did not inflate the tube a little before putting it on, do you guys do that or put it on completely flat?
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Old 05-31-19, 09:41 AM
  #50  
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I guess about 30 mins for me. I always wait for about 10 mins (even though this isn't necessary) to let the glue dry before I put back the innter tube.
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