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How long does it take you to fix a flat?

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How long does it take you to fix a flat?

Old 05-31-19, 09:46 AM
  #51  
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Back when I was using tubes, it would take me 10 - 15 mins to put in a new tube.

Never bothered patching the tube. Just took it home with me and then dropped it off for recycling.
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Old 05-31-19, 11:48 AM
  #52  
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I donít patch tubes on the side of the road, unless I absolutely have to. If I get a flat, I pull the tube and replace it. I also donít ride patched tubes except in a pinch. I normally carry two tubes, two 16g c02 cartridges, c02 injector, two tire levers, small 15mm wrench and a last resort patch kit. Even with nutted axles I can change a flat and be riding in less than 10 minutes, around 6-8 minutes in most cases. Flats are pretty rare for me though, so I suppose Iíll take that luck. If Iím riding in the city, (doing my daily commuting, etc) where I have access to bike shops, I typically only carry one tube, one c02 cartridge and no patch kit.

if it takes you more than 15 minutes (not counting time taken to patch a tube) you should probably practice. I donít mind fixing a flat, but I do mind spending a long time on the side of the road, doing it, and the latter isnít a requirement of the experience. If you insist on patching tubes for re-use after puncture, personally I would advise simply replacing the tube on the roadside, carry the punctured tube with you back home and patch it there, after your ride, to use as a spare. Thereís just no good reason to patch a tube on the roadside, unless itís a last resort to get you home. And in the case of last resort, how long it takes you to get rolling again wonít matter much, because it beats walking the bike or paying for a ride.

Last edited by seamuis; 05-31-19 at 12:00 PM.
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Old 05-31-19, 12:08 PM
  #53  
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One leak in 5 years with tubeless. Fatty tire was getting low. Stop, remove valve core, add 2oz bottle of stans, put core back, 2 CO2, and few pumps with the mini pump. Just remember to put in sealant a few times a year. Easy, peasy. So easy.
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Old 05-31-19, 12:24 PM
  #54  
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I have never timed it either and like many I use a new tube and patch at home. Unlike others I have retired from the patching game now. I strictly replace now and get on with my life. I also donít use the presta valve but. Am I alone on that?
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Old 05-31-19, 12:28 PM
  #55  
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Some time ago the Guiness World Record was held by a fellow who, at the time operated Bike Surgeon in Carbondale Illinois.

To be accepted he had to:
1. Remove the rear wheel.
2. Remove the tire and inner tube.
3. Check the inside of the tire for whatever caused the flat.
4. Reinflate the tire using a frame hand pump.
5. Actually ride away.
As I recall, his time (officially timed by the mayor of carbondale) was around 1 minute.

Among the things he did to set the record were:

1. Use a loose fitting tire/rim combination.
2. Fake the inner tire inspection.
3. Start with an already partially inflated replacement inner tube and pump it up to just barely rideable.

I used to be able to do it in around 5 minutes. The key, of course is how adept you are at removing the tire from the rim. Also, those steel belt wires can take 5 minutes just to to find and more time than that to root out.

One other thing that hasn't been specifically mentioned but only hinted at: Every time that I've had two flats on the same ride, the second has been due to something stupid I did while trying to repair the first. Today I'm MUCH more careful about checking the inside of my tire for whatever caused the puncture and MUCH more careful about making sure the inner tube isn't caught under one of the tire beads.
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Old 05-31-19, 12:34 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by deephate View Post
I have never timed it either and like many I use a new tube and patch at home. Unlike others I have retired from the patching game now. I strictly replace now and get on with my life. I also donít use the presta valve but. Am I alone on that?
are you saying you use Schrader? I strongly prefer presta over schrader, personally, but for letís just call it Ďhigh performanceí presta is usually your only choice, as far as road setups go. Obviously this is different for MTB/Downhill stuff. The only difference in a real world scenario between the two is the less than 3 seconds it takes to open and close the valve. I hardly think thatís consequential when dealing with a flat.
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Old 05-31-19, 12:38 PM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by seamuis View Post
are you saying you use Schrader? I strongly prefer presta over schrader, personally, but for letís just call it Ďhigh performanceí presta is usually your only choice, as far as road setups go. Obviously this is different for MTB/Downhill stuff. The only difference in a real world scenario between the two is the less than 3 seconds it takes to open and close the valve. I hardly think thatís consequential when dealing with a flat.
I miskeyed I meant to say I donít use the Presta NUT. Iím not good typing on a phone.
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Old 05-31-19, 12:38 PM
  #58  
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
One other thing that hasn't been specifically mentioned but only hinted at: Every time that I've had two flats on the same ride, the second has been due to something stupid I did while trying to repair the first. Today I'm MUCH more careful about checking the inside of my tire for whatever caused the puncture and MUCH more careful about making sure the inner tube isn't caught under one of the tire beads.
absolutely this. I made that mistake exactly one time. Now I carefully inspect the inside of the tire with a puncture. For avoiding getting your tube caught, the best remedy is to practice changing tubes, preferably at home, not on the side of the road. I roll all of my spare tubes up in the same way, so they lay flat when installing them, and sprinkle the tubes with talcum powder before rolling them up, so they arenít tacky and stick to the tire bead or rim when installing them.

simply put, if you do your due diligence, and work smart, then fixing a flat isnít a long or difficult process. Tubeless makes a lot of sense for off-road as well as on road for racing, not much sense for much else. So for people who think tubeless is so much better than tubes for everyday use, are likely people who donít work smart. That may be a wide statement, but Iím willing to bet, egos aside, its probably pretty accurate.

Last edited by seamuis; 05-31-19 at 12:46 PM.
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Old 05-31-19, 12:51 PM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by deephate View Post
I miskeyed I meant to say I donít use the Presta NUT. Iím not good typing on a phone.
Its only real purpose as far as i know is to keep the valve secure when using it in a rim that has a hole thatís too big. It helps if youíre using a small Ďminií pump, because using those is usually pretty stressful on the valve, the way theyíre designed. I havenít used those in many years. Most people donít need them any more than they need valves that are threaded along the length of the valve shaft, or need the plastic caps.
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Old 05-31-19, 01:06 PM
  #60  
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The guy in the first video that @rumrunn6 posted didn't do a complete job. He didn't look to find the cause of the puncture. Big points off for that. He didn't partially inflate the tube to prevent it from getting pinched. Minor points off, but if it works, OK. He didn't fully inflate the tire.

Once, I was on a group ride, and I yelled out that I got a flat. Someone walked over to help and was astonished to see I was already halfway done. I haven't timed myself, but I probably do it in five minutes. But I've had more practice than most. I used to work as a shop mechanic. That job involves fixing a ton of flats. It's quite surprising how many people just can't be bothered or don't know how. For me, it was busy work. I can nearly do it with my eyes closed.
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Old 05-31-19, 01:11 PM
  #61  
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All I know is it takes me a matter of minutes when in-the-garage sitting on a bucket. On the road, cars passing, in the grass.. it always seems to take longer (much sometimes) for some reason.
My theory is that the more of a hurry I'm in, the longer it takes. hmmmm.
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Old 05-31-19, 02:21 PM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by Kabuki12 View Post
I have actually had a modern racer on a carbon bike stop and offer me a tube . I was so impressed by this that I posted a thread on it. I had everything I needed to get myself going, but , after working all day and only couple of miles from my house I decided to call my wife and have her rescue me. I repaired it on the stand. I generally see us roadies offering assistance , but this guy was going the opposite direction and turned around to ask if I wanted a tube A W E S O M E ! Joe joesvintageroadbikes.wordpress
In my experience, racers are among the most prepared and most willing to help.
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Old 05-31-19, 03:00 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by deephate View Post
I miskeyed I meant to say I donít use the Presta NUT.
Originally Posted by seamuis View Post
Its only real purpose as far as i know is to keep the valve secure when using it in a rim that has a hole thatís too big. It helps if youíre using a small Ďminií pump, because using those is usually pretty stressful on the valve, the way theyíre designed.
It also prevents the valve stem from disappearing into the rim when you push the pump chuck onto the valve.
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Old 05-31-19, 03:22 PM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
It also prevents the valve stem from disappearing into the rim when you push the pump chuck onto the valve.
Problem solved by literally holding the valve stem with your fingers, for the two seconds you actually need the valve stem to not move. I use zipp tubes, which have a non threaded stem, so thatís what I have to do. But Iíve always just held the valve stem and I thought thatís what everyone did? But I take your point.
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Old 05-31-19, 05:48 PM
  #65  
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On the road I can change a flat in about 5 minutes or less if I find the hole quickly start to finish and using a pump. That includes checking the tire for the puncture's cause. In my home shop I can repair one a little faster than that. 26" tires even faster because they are easy off and easy on.

I don't race to repair a flat though. I keep hunting on the tire until I find the cause of the puncture. Nothing irritates me more than repairing a flat and then getting another one a couple of miles down the road because I didn't find the cause.

I got my practice working in bike shops when I was a teenager and another stint in a bike shop when I was 20 or 21. This was years ago when a shop actually used to repair tubes instead of replace them for a flat....circa 1975-81.


---

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Old 05-31-19, 06:48 PM
  #66  
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Man you guys are fast!

I allocate a full 10 minutes just for the initial cursing, not including actual cursing while working.
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Old 06-02-19, 08:42 PM
  #67  
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Tangentially related to this thread, earlier this afternoon as my gf and I geared up for a ride, she found the rear tire was flat on her bike. So I dutifully pulled the tube out and found a small puncture, patched it, and put it back in the tire. Pumped it up to about 40psi (26x2" mtb tire), and about a minute after I inflated and while I was reinstalling it on the bike, it blew out in spectacular fashion. So loud it sounded like a gunshot, and just a foot away from my ear. I still have a bit of ringing several hours later.



Damn tube burst at the seam for no reason. It was on the other side of the tube from where I patched it.
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Old 06-02-19, 10:32 PM
  #68  
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Depends on familiarity with your bike. My old singlespeed I could change a flat in 10 minutes. Surly straggler takes like 30 to replace the rear wheel. Dropouts were designed after a three week acid trip.
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Old 06-02-19, 10:53 PM
  #69  
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Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
Ditto, just swap the tube and it takes a few minutes. I wouldn't patch unless I had to, or else it was just a nice day with nowhere to get to, and I wanted to relax a while with it.
I suppose, this must be the best idea...!!
It took me a week to fix my last (first) puncture.
It needs confidence to take off the wheel, I suppose, to remove/replace inner.
I might buy solid tyres, and, I've got the pressure can of ??? Tube filler?
..but have not tried that yet...
I never realised how many small probs might occur on a long trip.
Each one might put me out of action, for a week.
Brakes, right now.
How often is it necessary to replace brake pads.
How to properly adjust.
What DIY fixes are there when you run out of brake pads etcetcetcetc.
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Old 06-03-19, 05:16 AM
  #70  
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Originally Posted by Flip Flop Rider View Post
guy on the video did not inflate the tube a little before putting it on, do you guys do that or put it on completely flat?
I inflate new tube however much I can by mouth (which isn't much obviously.. just a tiny bit of shape to the tube).
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Old 06-03-19, 05:33 AM
  #71  
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With my current tire and rim combination, it takes me less than 10 minutes to do the whole process with thru axles. I'm swapping tubes and not patching, though. I only patch when I get home or if I happen to flat again on the ride.

I have been riding with tubes containing sealant inside for months now. Since I haven't had any punctures and I wanted to save about 200g, yesterday I swapped out the front tube for regular ones. Woke up this morning to a flat front tire. Now the tubes with sealant is back in.
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Old 06-03-19, 05:53 AM
  #72  
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Ha, I got to do this Friday night. It's about 5 minutes with a new tube, more like 15 without. My tires (Compass Babyshoe Pass) and my rims (VO 650b jobs) play really well together and I frequently only use a lever to get the removal started. I always carry a spare tube (I actually patched 4 of them that had accumulated over the last year or so yesterday in the living room) and there is a frame pump on my bike (I don't remember the variety as it was powder coated to match my frame but it's somewhere between a full frame pump and a mini pump- fits on a peg along a seatstay).
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Old 06-03-19, 05:54 AM
  #73  
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It takes me about 10 - 15 minutes by the roadside, depending on how cold my hands are (if you're going to puncture it'll be at night when its cold and teeming down with rain) and how tight the tyre is on the rim. I always carry at least two tubes and don't bother with patching by the roadside.

I bought a couple of sets of Schwalbe tyre levers a few months back; they really do make removing and replacing recalcitrant tyres a whole lot quicker and easier, even the Michelin Lithions which broke two normal levers the first time I tried removing one.

I have frame pumps on all my bikes; they don't make inflating a tyre a pleasure but they are a whole lot quicker than using a mini pump.
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Old 06-03-19, 08:37 AM
  #74  
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Originally Posted by General Geoff View Post
Tangentially related to this thread, earlier this afternoon as my gf and I geared up for a ride, she found the rear tire was flat on her bike. So I dutifully pulled the tube out and found a small puncture, patched it, and put it back in the tire. Pumped it up to about 40psi (26x2" mtb tire), and about a minute after I inflated and while I was reinstalling it on the bike, it blew out in spectacular fashion. So loud it sounded like a gunshot, and just a foot away from my ear. I still have a bit of ringing several hours later.

*pic*

Damn tube burst at the seam for no reason. It was on the other side of the tube from where I patched it.
Maybe you pincehed the tube between rim and tire bead?

I've had similar thing happen to me once too. That time my rim had split open on the side, along the braking surface, due to being badly worn out, and the tube punctured on the new found sharp edge.
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Old 06-03-19, 08:40 AM
  #75  
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Doubtful, this particular tire fits pretty loosely on the rim. Don't even need levers to get it off or on. Tube was already partially inflated when I stuffed it back into the tire.
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