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How to move forward from a Raleigh Sojourn?

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How to move forward from a Raleigh Sojourn?

Old 06-01-19, 08:20 AM
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Jfbesek
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How to move forward from a Raleigh Sojourn?

Hi all,

I need some help. I bought a Raleigh Sojourn touring bike in 2013 - a now discontinued Raleigh disc brake touring bike - and need to move on. I thought I would tour a bit (never happened.. and now I have one kid and another on the way so it's really never going to happen), but do commute in a city that has plenty of potholes strange surfaces. I am also an academic, and therefore drag around many books and papers and whatever else in my panniers. Given all this, I originally went with a touring bike but now realize that this was a) the wrong touring bike and b) I probably don't even need a touring bike at all.

The real issue is that the Sojourn is so goddamn heavy. I drag this thing up and down and around the city 7 months out of the year (tis' a snowy city) and am tired of it. I replaced the stock tires and wheels with much nicer bontrager tires and new wheels, and that did help lighten the load a tad bit. But I am tired of making excuses for the weight every time I hop on it. Also, I am not sure the geometry of the frame is right for me - I am hunched over more than I like. And am ambivalent about the disc brakes (though worry they are adding more to the weight than is worth it).

So... I am thinking this. I get a new frameset (and maybe brakes) and have my LBS merge the things I like about the Sojourn onto the new frameset. I am not thinking about getting a new bike because I do like the handlebars, new wheels, etc. on the Sojourn and think it would be a waste of money to not use the parts I like. I am thinking a Cross Check frame? but am also open to a Volpe or whatever else. I am also open to buying a used frame if that works just as well. I imagine just working with my LBS to figure this out. Does this sound like a good idea? Would my LBS charge a fortune to "merge" the parts I like about the Sojourn with whatever else I end up with? (I feel confident doing minor repairs / tune-ups but this is a job I would rather leave to those with more experience).

Thanks in advance for any advice.
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Old 06-02-19, 06:53 AM
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Maelochs
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"According to the road.cc scales it's 14.5kg, (32 lbs.) on the heavy side for a tourer at this price. A lot of that is down to the wheels and tyres, which my scales say weigh a whopping 5.75kg (12.7 lbs.) on their own. The wide metal mudguards don't help either, they are beautiful, rattle free and easy to setup, but heavier than chromoplastic." https://road.cc/content/review/59935-raleigh-sojourn

Yes, that is heavy for even a touring bike but only by a couple of pounds.

However ... I doubt you'd save money by trying to reuse the parts, unless you do the work yourself of the shop does the work for free. The wheels obviously you could swap yourself, the rest, I don't know your level of expertise or what tools you have. You say you would prefer the shop do it---have you asked about pricing? Maybe buy a whole new bike, swap the parts you like, and sell the old one?

If you ever ride in any kind of wet weather the discs are good idea and the weight gain is marginal, IMO. However, if you have Avid BB5s .... get some good high-end hydraulics (Shimano 105) or go the simpler route and get Spyre C mech discs. The Spyres aren't superior brakes, but they are the best mechanical discs. They are easy to set up and maintain, will stop you reliably in any weather, and will do so as well as any rim brakes. Any Shimano hydro discs will be superior brakes. (Th Avids are mechanical disc, but they don't self-center like the Spyres, which (IMO) are a much better and more advanced design.)

I have a Fuji Sportiv with Spyre discs, and I regularly carry a huge amount of gear. The bike is perfect for the task. However, you might want something which can handle wider tires than the 28s the Sportiv can fit. That's a personal thing. I did harsh urban commutes for many tears with tires in the 28-32 mm range without issue. I guess it depends on the dimensions of your new wheels.

If you want a lighter bike, why not look for an aluminum frame and carbon fork? Steel is real and all ... and it weighs more. If weight is a complaint, why choose the heaviest frame material?

As for fit ... well, you can adjust a lot of that with seat post setback, stem length and angle, and spacers ... but if you got the wrong size bike, you just did, nothing will fix that. But that is not really "geometry," so much, as you just got there wrong size. Most touring bikes have slack head- and seat tube angles and are a little more relaxed---higher bars, more weight on the saddle (does your have the Brooks B17?) which is what you'd want for long days on the bike. Sounds like you either got a frame a couple sizes too small,. it was set up wrong, or both. But if the bike doesn't fit, that alone mandates a new bike--or frame, at least.

Not much else to say. keep us updated on your process and post pics of the new ride
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Old 06-02-19, 07:05 AM
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Can't add anything to that, other than reiterate how much you won't save having a shop transfer parts to a new frame.

If that's the direction you still want to go, you can learn pretty much anything you need from youtube. It'll be much better to spend a little on tools rather that a bunch on having it done, and in the process learn how to maintain what you have.
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Old 06-02-19, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Jfbesek View Post
So... I am thinking this. I get a new frameset (and maybe brakes) and have my LBS merge the things I like about the Sojourn onto the new frameset. I am not thinking about getting a new bike because I do like the handlebars, new wheels, etc. on the Sojourn and think it would be a waste of money to not use the parts I like.
Cost it out. My bet is, including labor, there won't be much cost difference between what you are thinking and buying a whole new bike.

A new bike comes with every single part brand new, every single part designed to work with every other part. It will also come with a new bike warranty.
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Old 06-02-19, 09:27 AM
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Thanks so much to the both of you. A quick clarification - the bike is 35 lbs (weighed at the shop and my house at the time of purchase)... now 32ish with the new wheels and tires. I think the way to go is to maybe buy a new bike, just swap the parts I like, and then sell the old one. I will look into the Sportif (the price looks to be right...).
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Old 06-02-19, 09:59 AM
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N+1, Get a 2nd, new, bike , equipment on your Tour bike is useful for grocery shopping .

It gets quite a bit heavier when I ride home with food aboard.

and the bike made to carry a load is Ideal for that..





...
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