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Long Haul Trucker

Old 09-04-19, 12:21 PM
  #26  
pdlamb
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Don't bother with the current "touring" bike from Cannondale. It's a platypus. It looks a bit like a duck but isn't a duck and doesn't do what a duck should do.
You even need to get a custom horn to make it quack...
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Old 09-05-19, 01:36 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I wouldn't use a LHT because I don't (and won't) have steel in my garage but that's me.
What is it about steel bikes you don't like?
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Old 09-05-19, 08:07 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Seems that way. My original touring bike was a '98 Cannondale T 700. Aside from the wheels, I really like that bike. Quite light for it's XL size. Its in my basement slowly returning to bauxite. Keep meaning to put it out on the curb for the junk guys who comb the 'hood before trash pickup.
Don't do that! The least you could do is donate it to a co-op/charity or sell it on Fleabay. It's too fine a touring bike to just be junked. Offer it to Blueweim if nothing else.
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Old 09-05-19, 08:14 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
What is it about steel bikes you don't like?
The steel.

Less facetiously, I had a steel touring bike up until 2003. It was nice enough...a 83 Miyata 610...but it always had issues with a flexible frame. I could never climb out of the saddle with it which gets old on long slow climbs when the ol' wallies are getting a little numb. I tested a Surly LHT when I was looking in 2003 but found it to be equally flexible. The T800 was stiffer, lighter, and felt better. Once I put bags on the bike, it really began to shine. Loaded, the ride is similar to the ride of an unloaded steel bike but the frame is stiff enough that I can get out of the saddle and swing the bike back and forth like an unloaded road bike while staying in a straight line. I could never do that with the old steel bike.

I've also wanted a Cannondale since I 1983. I waited 20 years but, in my opinion, I really did get a superior touring bike.
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Old 09-05-19, 10:05 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Loose Chain View Post
OP, rather than the LHT, maybe the Cross Check (Straggler, same bike in a disc). The CC is not super light either but the weight weenies can moan all they like, it is a great, do everything bicycle and I mean everything. Touring, gravel, cycle cross, winter road practice and just plain out road, single speed, fixie, fitness, commuting, even single track, racks, skinny tires, fat tires, even big tires, fenders are all within it's credentials and like any jack of all trades, it is not the best at any single thing but few bikes can do all of them as well as the CC.

Purchase a CC using the top tube C/C length to gauge the frame size. The cycle cross high bottom bracket and low top tube (for stand over on uneven surfaces) fools people, for example, a 54cm frame by Surly measurements is actually a 56cm for fit.
Yeah I have a Cross Check 60cm. Iím 6í2.5 and believe a 58 would be a better fit. Iím looking for a 58 lht but rather purchase something used. Seems many of the older models are over priced, even ones ten and eleven yes old. Might as well buy new
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Old 09-05-19, 08:50 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
What is it about steel bikes you don't like?
He rants about steel being too flexible. It's one if those to each their own sort of scenarios.

My road bikes are all steel, my gravel bike is steel, and my touring bike is steel. I am 240# and dont find that any of the frames flex to the point of me not being able to climb out of the saddle. With the group I ride frequently, I am comically known as someone who stands and climbs most every hill at least halfway. If any of the frames flexed in a bad way when standing, it would infuriate me on every ride.
Even with loaded bags, my touring bike doesn't flex in a bad way.

But maybe I somehow ride light while being heavy and standing?...that's about the only way i can explain it when others say steel frames twist like a wet noodle.

I have a Cannondale t700 touring frame that's built with modern 2x9 components. It rides fine- I dont like it more or less than some of my other bikes.
Of all the bikes, guess which one is for sale on craigslist though...

But really- its nice there are multiple frame materials as it allows each of us to find what we like.
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Old 09-06-19, 01:13 AM
  #32  
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I have also not experienced undue flex with my long haul trucker even with a combined system weight of 330lbs. I do climb out of saddle on tour and the LHT is stable and unflexing for that kind of thing.
I'm fairly certain that modern touring steel frames have significantly larger tube diameters than the lugged steel bikes of yore. Also the chain and seat stays of the LHT are positively massive when comparing them to say, a miyata 610. Generally larger tube diameters and larger better shaped stays make for a much stiffer bike than what could be had in the past.

Of course with its stiffness the LHT is a compromise, meaning that it's a bit harsh unloaded. This can be greatly alleviated with supple wide tires, but those then carry extra risk for punctures.

For commuting and utility the LHT is just fabulous. Really it's an ideal bike for just that. With a front and rear racks as well as a handlebar bag mount I can carry more than I could ever need. However when commuting I usually make do with a single bag packed with my work gear (laptop, keyboard, mouse, charger), some spare clothes, diabetes gear, tools and spare tube etc. It's around 6kg and in one bag thus mounted on one side. I do not notice the bag at all when riding. It has absolutely no effect on anything. Naturally I mount it on the rear rack as one sided packing on a front lowrider is horrid.

So if one were to use the LHT for commuting my advice would be to get a really good rear rack (I use a tubus cargo, it's rock solid and bombproof) and mount your stuff on the rear rack. The handling charasteristics of the LHT do not really deteriorate with rear loads if the weight isn't something incomprehensible.

A further positive feature of the LHT is the geometry. While the LHT does have a long frame it also has decent stack and a long steel steerer tube on the fork. This effectively means that one gains the ability to create a very relaxed (for beginners) riding position with drop bars and more so with some other bar type. The steel steerer allows for a high spacer stack without compromising safety or handling. Relaxed means one can go slow and going slow means one does not need to get sweaty (or as sweaty) which can be beneficial for commuting purposes (my office doesn't have a shower so...)
Personally I use the spacer stack to mount a second stem below the actual stem which then holds an Ortlieb Ultimate 6 handlebar mount. That way I have space on my handlebar for aerobars, cycling computers and such.

For commuting purposes it's a good idea to get fenders which the LHT mounts quite nicely. I use SKS Longboards which are extra long and have large mudflaps. Keeps the bike and rider much cleaner.

As one last clarification, while I'm talking about the LHT, which my bike officially is, I'd highly recommend primarily considering the Disc Trucker which is effectively the same bike but with disc brakes. My LHT has the DT fork so I have a front disc brake, which is really nice. IMO disc brakes are far superior especially for commuting as they perform consistently in all conditions and don't wear down the rim. For fair weather cycling doesn't really matter, but for a commuter we can rarely decide which weather it's going to face.
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