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Jacket material called Polartec Neoshell

Old 12-22-19, 11:56 AM
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Jacket material called Polartec Neoshell

I have been looking at this material that some manufacturers are using. It's called Neoshell and its made by Polartec. I think its a softshell type material, it breathes and is waterproof - Im trying to work out if this material has a traditional membrane or if there is some advanced technology here. Anyone have any deep knowledge of this?
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Old 12-22-19, 12:55 PM
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I have no deep knowledge of this fabric but the video indicated several layers, one of which is waterproof and "wind resistant". I have a pair of winter soft shell ski pants made of Swiss Schoeller soft shell fabric. They are wind resistant, have some stretch for comfort and are completely warm down to below zero F. They were expensive but worth every penny. I would hope the Polartec fabric is similarly effective. https://polartec.com/fabrics/weather...ction/neoshell
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Old 12-22-19, 01:05 PM
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https://www.polartec.com/fabrics/wea...ction/neoshell
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Old 12-22-19, 01:52 PM
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Looking for some deep knowledge on this material beyond the marketing based type of information. Wondering if anyone on this board has some knowledge.
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Old 12-22-19, 02:14 PM
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It doesn't look much different than the old Gortex membrane fabrics. From personal experience the Gortex fabrics were great for wind resistance (especially in below-zero environments), for some light water resistance (simple sprinkling rainfall) , but lousy in rainstorms - they'd act no different than PVC or plastic materials and just create a sauna-type atmosphere under your clothes. It's even worse if you're moving around and generating body heat. No thanks, I'll stick with a poncho and bicycle fenders.
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Old 12-22-19, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by skidder View Post
It doesn't look much different than the old Gortex membrane fabrics. From personal experience the Gortex fabrics were great for wind resistance (especially in below-zero environments), for some light water resistance (simple sprinkling rainfall) , but lousy in rainstorms - they'd act no different than PVC or plastic materials and just create a sauna-type atmosphere under your clothes. It's even worse if you're moving around and generating body heat. No thanks, I'll stick with a poncho and bicycle fenders.
It seems in most cases softshells vs hardshells, the hardshells are much better in downpours, but the knit stretchy nature of shoftshells lends them to better breathability and fit. I think a lot of it has to do with the fabric treatments and the type of membrane.
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Old 12-26-19, 06:49 AM
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The advantage of "hardshell" jackets is that the wind and water resistance is on the outside, and you can layer underneath for the temperatures. So the same jacket can work for winter up through summer temps, depending on your layers underneath. Jackets that include some type of fleece in addition to the wind/water resistant layer are not as flexible for varying temps.

I'm looking for a Gore Shakedry jacket now. After the Hilly Hundred this year, I've picked up some merino wool base layer long sleeve shirts, shoe covers, helmet cover, skull cap, and full finger gloves. The jacket should give me a good set of choices for less than ideal cycling weather.
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Old 12-26-19, 08:09 AM
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Originally Posted by skidder View Post
No thanks, I'll stick with a poncho and bicycle fenders.
That'll probably work in the extreme climate of the OC.
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Old 12-26-19, 08:25 AM
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Looking for trade secrets?
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Old 12-26-19, 09:48 AM
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I would call Lou at FoxWear.net . I heard lots of good reviews of the Neoshell material . Lou can send you a sample of the material. He can make you a custom jacket out of it for less $$ than most retailers . I think he is having problems with his website now. You may need to google TheFoxWear instead of FoxWear now.
Personally I think the material is not stretchy enough for cycling although has very good breatherbility ratings and I have read it is very waterproof if that is what your looking for. Another option is Polartec Power Shield, very similar to Neoshell
https://thefoxwear.net/

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Old 12-26-19, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Andrey View Post
I would call Lou at FoxWear.net . I heard lots of good reviews of the Neoshell material . Lou can send you a sample of the material. He can make you a custom jacket out of it for less $$ than most retailers . I think he is having problems with his website now. You may need to google TheFoxWear instead of FoxWear now.
Personally I think the material is not stretchy enough for cycling although has very good breatherbility ratings and I have read it is very waterproof if that is what your looking for. Another option is Polartec Power Shield, very similar to Neoshell
Foxwear | Custom Sized Sports Clothing by Lou Binik | Salmon, ID | (877) 756-3699
I was just going to suggest Foxwear.
Due to my disproportionately long legs, I ordered custom softshell winter pants from him a few years ago, and I love them!
I don't recall exactly which material they are. There is a tag inside that simply says "Polartec".
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Old 12-26-19, 10:42 AM
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Sorry, no deep knowledge about this particular patented fabric. No one will have any because itís patented. You may eventually find some some independent testing and user experience testimonials for whatever they are worth.

But hereís the sad truth about any porous, breathable material: it cannot possibly be waterproof. All porous materials regardless of weave, layers, added treatments, and advertising hype are not waterproof.

If true waterproof garments are what youíre after, the best option for extended vigorous activity are any of the many garments constructed of plastic or rubber coated materials with sealed seams and generous vents. Unfortunately, such items are not particularly light, stretchy or trim fitting. That is why cyclists generally avoid them and search for whatever is personally considered to be an acceptable compromise.

Any garment made from any of the later generation high tech materials and weaves such as gortex, etc., kept treated with a good industrial strength water repellent spray finish such as Scotchgard, etc. work fairly well unless wading in water or exposed to long periods of heavy rain. But you need to retreat after ever exposure to rain or periods of extended wear. But again, for best water resistance without heavy moisture build up underneath from vigorous activity the garments must be loosely fitting, have sealed seams, and have generous vents. So again not ideal for cycling.

Pick your compromise and just enjoy your foul weather cycling.
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Old 12-26-19, 12:28 PM
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Some info in this article: https://www.outsideonline.com/1898541/insane-membrane
(Just use page search for: Neoshell)
Apparently Neoshell has a membrane, but it is different from what Goretex uses.
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Old 12-26-19, 11:33 PM
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Originally Posted by speedevil View Post
The advantage of "hardshell" jackets is that the wind and water resistance is on the outside, and you can layer underneath for the temperatures. So the same jacket can work for winter up through summer temps, depending on your layers underneath. Jackets that include some type of fleece in addition to the wind/water resistant layer are not as flexible for varying temps.

I'm looking for a Gore Shakedry jacket now. After the Hilly Hundred this year, I've picked up some merino wool base layer long sleeve shirts, shoe covers, helmet cover, skull cap, and full finger gloves. The jacket should give me a good set of choices for less than ideal cycling weather.
That is true, but one of the main advantages of the softshell is they breathe better (ie vapor transfer from inside to outside) than a hardshell. That's why I'm trying to get a bit more info on Neoshell tech
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Old 12-26-19, 11:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Shimagnolo View Post
Some info in this article: https://www.outsideonline.com/1898541/insane-membrane
(Just use page search for: Neoshell)
Apparently Neoshell has a membrane, but it is different from what Goretex uses.
That's a deep read thanks for finding that and posting. Good stuff in there I read it twice, they really make Gore out to be the evil people don't they!
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Old 12-27-19, 06:46 AM
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Originally Posted by jbucky1 View Post
That is true, but one of the main advantages of the softshell is they breathe better (ie vapor transfer from inside to outside) than a hardshell. That's why I'm trying to get a bit more info on Neoshell tech
You should read some reviews for the Gore Shakedry jacket. You might just change your mind about breathability and water resistance of hardshell jackets.
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Old 12-27-19, 10:50 AM
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Yah, I have read a lot about ShakeDry, very innovative tech. Still not as breathable as some of the highend softshell materials. I wonder where Neoshell stacks up with Shakedry?, im sure it's not as water resistant but breathability I dunno. There are cons and pro's to each. speedevil
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Old 12-27-19, 11:01 AM
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As a generalised statement im trying to see where Polertec Neoshell fits into this chart. I understand there are manufacturers with exceptions. speedevil

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Old 12-27-19, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Sapperc View Post
Sorry, no deep knowledge about this particular patented fabric. No one will have any because itís patented. You may eventually find some some independent testing and user experience testimonials for whatever they are worth.

But hereís the sad truth about any porous, breathable material: it cannot possibly be waterproof. All porous materials regardless of weave, layers, added treatments, and advertising hype are not waterproof.

If true waterproof garments are what youíre after, the best option for extended vigorous activity are any of the many garments constructed of plastic or rubber coated materials with sealed seams and generous vents. Unfortunately, such items are not particularly light, stretchy or trim fitting. That is why cyclists generally avoid them and search for whatever is personally considered to be an acceptable compromise.

Any garment made from any of the later generation high tech materials and weaves such as gortex, etc., kept treated with a good industrial strength water repellent spray finish such as Scotchgard, etc. work fairly well unless wading in water or exposed to long periods of heavy rain. But you need to retreat after ever exposure to rain or periods of extended wear. But again, for best water resistance without heavy moisture build up underneath from vigorous activity the garments must be loosely fitting, have sealed seams, and have generous vents. So again not ideal for cycling.

Pick your compromise and just enjoy your foul-weather cycling.
Your information does not apply to the new Shakedry material from GoreTex. Waterproof and very breathable plus does not rely on a waterproof coating. Obviously not as breathable as standard cloth jersey or water-resistant softshell such as Pearl Izumi P.I. Dry.
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Old 12-27-19, 12:38 PM
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we are kind splitting hairs obviously but thats ok.... velopig I think Sapperc is technically correct. There are shades of grey here but even advanced materials are not 100% waterproof even ShakeDry. They just have a higher rating. Normally thats the standing static water column rating that testers use. 5,000mm, 10,000mm, 15,000mm etc My guess is Shakedry is above 15,000mm , but im guessing.

This is an interesting link
https://www.gore-tex.co.uk/blog/when...ent-waterproof
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Old 12-30-19, 02:00 PM
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See if you can dig up some info on BackpackingLight, lots of geeky, knowledgeable folks. There's even one user (Richard Nisley, I think) who tests clothing for warmth/oz and breathability/water vapor transmission.
https://www.google.com/search?&q=neo...ckinglight.com
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Old 12-30-19, 04:53 PM
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Every weather-resistant jacket I've tried over the decades has failed to be breathable in real world use -- Gore-Tex, Shimano's Storm Jacket with claimed comparable breathable membrane, ditto Pearl Izumi and others. Every one of them turned out to be sweat tents on hikes or bike rides. The only use where my Columbia Gore-Tex parka has been perfect was for motorcycle commutes in winter, even in rain. But it was a sweatbox used in its intended environment -- hiking.

If the fabric is truly breathable, it's readily permeable to rain.

After years of trying various combinations of outer wear and baselayers, I've finally settled on the reality that I'll be soaked inside from rain or sweat. So all I'm concerned about is a good wicking baselayer to move most of it away from my torso, and a windproof shell. As long as it's windproof, I don't care how wet I am inside. At least it's warm and wet.

I've tried a couple of softshells that aren't claimed to be windproof, maybe wind resistant, but are readily permeable to water. They're okay down to the high 30s (F) for bike rides. Nike's Dri-Fit breathes well so I never get soaked in sweat and it's reasonably resistant to wind, so if I'm wearing a couple of good baselayers it's comfortable in dry weather down into the 30s. If I add a Pearl Izumi Select Barrier ultralight packable windbreaker, I can handle temps into the 20s, or misting rain into the 40s. The PI windbreaker is not rain resistant, despite their claims. However it remains wind resistant even when soaked, so it's a reasonable compromise for the negligible weight and packed size that will stuff into a jersey pocket, or water bottle cage.

One of the best I've found turned out to be an inexpensive no-name jersey/jacket from one of those many Amazon vendors selling peculiarly named cycling apparel. This Outto jacket cost around $25 shipped (Amazon Prime) and has been very comfortable down to the 30s (although it hasn't helped with my doggone sinus headaches from riding in cold this year). It combines a wind resistant smooth soft shell with fleece inner layer on every forward facing surface that's most exposed to wind, with a black stretchy breathable fabric that feels like the usual Spandex, elastane, etc., on surfaces out of the wind on typical bike rides.

I still sweat like a hot tub but never even notice. The fleece lining of the wind resistant shell immediately wicks moisture toward the eslastane/Spandex material under the arms, back of the jacket (including the rear pockets), where it evaporates without causing a chilling sensation. Of course it helps to wear a good long sleeve wicking baselayer. I usually combine a sleeveless Pearl Izumi Thermal baselayer of their Minerale fabric from the 2011-2014 era (sadly discontinued as it was too expensive), with a generic long sleeve baselayer from Amazon (same fabric used by Champion, Under Armour and many others). Haven't been uncomfortable once this autumn/winter on hard rides from the 30s-low 70s -- a typical Texas winter day, where the morning can begin in the 30s and warm up to 70s. With the Outto jacket I don't need to shed layers as the day warms up and figure out a place to pack a bulky hardshell jacket. When I get home the black elastic material including the pockets will be soaked. But I never feel it during a ride. The only drawback is my phone and wallet will be wet, but the phone is water resistant and the wallet dries out quickly. Occasionally I'll remember to put that stuff in a ziplock baggie.

Lots of nice features and attention to detail: an easily accessible front breast zipper pocket (my phone usually goes there); a smaller zippered security pocket in the back, along with three open slip pockets; wind resistant flaps under the zipper; reasonably high neck with soft fabric and little "garage" flap for the zipper; hi-viz yellow band on the back along with reflective accents. If it had a name brand marque and logo it would have a MSRP of $100 or more. It really is a great value.
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