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Comparing ride data - any high-mileage riders to compare?

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Comparing ride data - any high-mileage riders to compare?

Old 01-02-20, 12:23 AM
  #1  
KC8QVO
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Comparing ride data - any high-mileage riders to compare?

I am looking over my ride data from 2019 and am setting a mileage goal for 2020. I know there are people that ride in the 7,000+ mile range in a year out there and I am curious how that is possible.

My average speed came out to 7.012mph for the year. This speed is factored off the trip time on my computer vs total miles. The trip time is somewhat of a bogus number because that largely includes stopped time, yet on some rides I did pause it (for example - fixing a flat I paused the trip timer through that period). So the 7.012mph is not a moving average, it is a time vs distance average across the year.

Using that speed average and saying that an average day's ride is in the 8 hour ballpark, for hitting 7,000 miles for the year that would require a bit over 123 days riding - with a mileage average around 56-57 miles per ride.

How is that humanly possible?

Therein lies my question. Those of you that are riding way up there in miles - what do your numbers show? How are you able to dedicate the time to your riding to achieve those numbers?
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Old 01-02-20, 12:58 AM
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I did it one year, 7300 miles but I worked nights. I did 30 mile rides before work twice per week. I did 100 mile rides 23 times that year. That would be on Saturdays, Sundays were followed by 40 milers. Other Sats that I did not do 100, I was doing 40-60 both weekend days. 40 miles takes me about 2.5 hours.

I did a solo 100 mile ride averaging 17.5 MPH on the average. I did one 100 miler with 10,000 ft of gain at 14.0 average speed.

So not like it was taking me anywhere near 8 hours per day to get in the mileage.

I had a great year then the next year I did 6,000.

The year after that, I felt like I was cycling and working so I tapered down to 4,000-5,000. Got to see my wife more once I got on dayshift.

Last 3 years have been plagued with family illnesses and deaths so hopefully 2020 I can get some better mileage going on.

I remember a thread with a guy stating he thought there was no way a person could ride 2,000 miles per year while working an 8 hour job. If there is a will, there is a way. My wife worked the last 22 years, 10 hour days and still managed 3,000 miles per year, several years of the last 22.
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Old 01-02-20, 01:41 AM
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katsup
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Biking to work helps build up mileage. I only have a 5 mile one way commute and managed to hit 2780 miles in 2019 and 3180 miles in 2018. That includes being down between Nov-Feb and short rides only till April due to a bad injury.
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Old 01-02-20, 04:58 AM
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Putting in thousands of miles a year is a huge time sink, no way around that. I just finished 2019 with around 6,200 miles and 475 hours. Mostly solo rides this past year, faster and more difficult terrain than I've done before. That's a guesstimate because I don't think Strava distinguishes between outdoor rides and indoor trainer sessions, even though they have categories for each. I rode 3-5 times a week, usually 20-50 miles per session. Lots of walking too.

And in 2017 I did just over 7,000 miles (all outdoor, I didn't have an indoor trainer then), taking around 531 hours. Lots of more casual paced group rides that year.

But I'm retired now and have time. When I was younger I mostly bike commuted, which put in a lot of time and miles. Occasionally I'd race crits and time trials and didn't bother training, other than to treat my 10 mile commutes both ways as training rides. And back then our club did some long distance rides, so we'd do two or three rides a year of 75-250 miles on weekends. With a full time job, part time job and family, that's all I had time for then... and my first (now ex) wife wasn't happy about that. Something to consider if one is happily married, or hopes to be. Even if we enjoy sports or physical activities, sometimes it's better to set those aside as much as possible unless we can involve the family. Unfortunately my exes and kids were never interested in any sports or physical activities, so I was mostly inactive for about 30 years during that whole family and jobs era.

I know some folks who've compromised by using indoor trainers for about half of their workouts. They're home more, and even if they aren't directly interacting with the family, some folks are happy, or at least less insecure, with a head count under one roof. And the conditioning helps them maximize their outdoor rides so they're stronger, faster and either finish a route quicker or put in more miles in the same time.
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Old 01-02-20, 05:11 AM
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For a few different reasons my mileage crashed during the second half of 2019, leaving me with just over 3000 miles.

Officially listed as 7680 miles for 2018, and 742 hours, and 233 "activities" (generally one activity a riding day).

Most of my riding is commuting, errands, & utility riding. And, I was "car-free" in 2018.

My shorter commutes were around 20 miles RT, with typical daily commutes 30 to 45 miles or so RT. The longest "commutes" of sorts hit 200 miles (either one-way or RT).

I did find that I was spending a lot of time on the bike, and a quick shopping trip could easily take up half an afternoon.

The time commitment is actually one of the things that I'm currently wrestling with.
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Old 01-02-20, 05:57 AM
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I rode exactly 7000 miles this year. Most of my riding is on weekends during spring summer and fall, averaging close to 200 miles per weekend. To keep those rides interesting, I usually pick a place about 50 miles out from home and make it a destination. I will pause the timer while I'm hanging out there. I don't autopause for stoplights, etc., and my average speed usually averages about 16 miles an hour. Generally, it takes me just over 6 hours to ride a century. During the long summer days, I often do 150 mile rides.

When the days are long enough, I also do a 24 mile fast MUP ride after work on the weekdays.
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Old 01-02-20, 06:04 AM
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The only time I've come close to 7,000 miles was when I bike commuted. That was about 4,000 miles per year of "free cycling" and the other 3,000 miles was one long ride per week, an occasional second shorter ride, and often a high mileage biking week on family vacation.

I'm still working but work at home - no commute! That does give me flexibility to work in an occasional mid-week ride but a high mileage year (like 2019) is now about 5000 miles for me and that includes about 1,500 mile on my bike indoors on a smart trainer and Zwift. Between work demands, family demands and weather, I'm happy hitting 3,000 outdoor miles any year.

I don't see that changing much when I retire - I enjoy hiking, kayaking and another recreational hobbies that demand time, too.

It is a pretty simple equation, there are only 3 variables: (1) Ride faster (higher mph/less stop time); (2) Do more rides that require less travel time to the ride; (3) Stop doing something else and ride more hours!

I ride to maximize fun. Faster is more fun sometimes, not all the time. Traveling to interesting rides is often a lot of fun. Other things than biking are often more fun than biking! I have a friend (not a racer) where pretty much all the fun is faster and he doesn't have any other daytime hobbies and he mostly does the same routes from his house all day long - he is one of those 7000+ miles per year types and loves it.
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Old 01-02-20, 06:59 AM
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I'll throw in another data point at 6,280 for 2018 as well. I just did the math and it's 17.5 miles per day average. Like others have pointed out it was a considerable investment for me with a young family and full-time job. Pretty much over the summer I did thirty miles a day, about 18mph average. Handful of centuries and quite a few metric centuries at 15mph average.

I watched a GCN video with Mark Beaumont who cycled around the world. A piece of advice he had that I've kept close is not to "faff around". I did a 140 mile one day ride this past year in 2019. I had a puncture and ended up going off course to buy another tube to replace my spare. That cost me about an hour of ride time as I changed tubes quickly but had a drink, a snack. Chatted with a passerby. Chatted with the bike store people, slowly pedaled around. So there's a loss of 15 miles from my trip. Roughly 10%. Now when I try for a long ride next year I have a front bag with all my nutrition for the day, two extra tubes and patch kit. I'm contemplating more then two water bottles, and going tubeless.

When you start thinking about rides longer then 100 miles and my average speed of 15mph, we're talking 8+ hours of on the saddle riding!
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Old 01-02-20, 07:30 AM
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I rode 7177 miles last year. Don't know the moving average speed, but it is typically around 15-16 mph. (It's very hilly around here, and I ride a lot of gravel.)

I rarely stop during a ride; on most rides under 40 miles, I don't stop at all. It also helps that I am semi-retired, and don't work at all during the summer.
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Old 01-02-20, 08:16 AM
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If you can just get out on weekdays and consistently get 10-15 miles a day in you will have a little chunk of miles under your belt before you know it. I've never had a really big year but I've had a couple of large months and it does take a commitment and consumes a fair amount of time.
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Old 01-02-20, 08:43 AM
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I'm kind of stuck on 10,000+ miles as being "high mileage" because that is what traditionally gets recognition from my club. The 10,000 milers I know who work full time generally ride to and from the weekend club rides, turning a 60 mile ride into 80 or 100 or more. Although winter isn't much fun, here in TN we can ride some each month, no 3 or 4 months off like other places. I can see how folks in MN or ND might be tempted to count indoor "miles."
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Old 01-02-20, 09:39 AM
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during the week weather permitting, I ride about an hour everyday. My speed has increased a lot since march so I am usually able to complete 18 miles in that hour. On the weekend I do a longer ride, 30 miles, takes me between hour thirty or a little longer. Good days my average speed is right around 19 mph, easy days it’s around 17 mph.
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Old 01-02-20, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
I'm kind of stuck on 10,000+ miles as being "high mileage" because that is what traditionally gets recognition from my club. The 10,000 milers I know who work full time generally ride to and from the weekend club rides, turning a 60 mile ride into 80 or 100 or more. Although winter isn't much fun, here in TN we can ride some each month, no 3 or 4 months off like other places. I can see how folks in MN or ND might be tempted to count indoor "miles."
and my goal this year just jumped from 7 to 10......
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Old 01-02-20, 09:50 AM
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Sorry if I sound suspicious, but 7 mph sounds like a very slow pace. I might hit (or even fall below it) that if I included the work day between my two commutes -- but that's not really riding time. So the first thing to do is either to pick up your pace, or limit your stopped time during your rides. Want to sit and watch a river or lake for a hour? Or do you enjoy sit-down meals at the midpoint of your ride? Either accept you're spending more time "riding," or don't count it as riding and count the time as spending time outdoors or dining.

My "base" is commuting -- about an hour and a half and 20 miles per day. If you don't want to commute, try to get out and ride (or ride inside) for a similar period most days. With that base of around 3,500-4,000 miles, add in a 50 mile ride (most) weekends, for another 2,500 miles. Throw in a bicycling vacation or two, for 350-400 miles per week, and a few longer rides like a century, and you can make up that extra 1,000 miles in a year's time. If you get out and ride 50 miles every Saturday morning, you can meet your significant other for a late lunch and spend the rest of the day with them.
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Old 01-02-20, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
I'm kind of stuck on 10,000+ miles as being "high mileage" because that is what traditionally gets recognition from my club. The 10,000 milers I know who work full time generally ride to and from the weekend club rides, turning a 60 mile ride into 80 or 100 or more. Although winter isn't much fun, here in TN we can ride some each month, no 3 or 4 months off like other places. I can see how folks in MN or ND might be tempted to count indoor "miles."
Or New England.

I consider myself a high mileage rider because I manage to get 7000 miles in in a climate where there are not more than 8 plausible months a year to do high-mileage road riding. Since I do my indoor "training" in the winter on an elliptical, I'm not tempted to label it as "miles" to pad the numbers.

That 10,000 figure is probably about where I'd be with an additional 3-4 months of outdoor riding, and really an absurdly high number for this region.
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Old 01-02-20, 09:58 AM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
Sorry if I sound suspicious, but 7 mph sounds like a very slow pace. I might hit (or even fall below it) that if I included the work day between my two commutes -- but that's not really riding time. So the first thing to do is either to pick up your pace, or limit your stopped time during your rides. Want to sit and watch a river or lake for a hour? Or do you enjoy sit-down meals at the midpoint of your ride? Either accept you're spending more time "riding," or don't count it as riding and count the time as spending time outdoors or dining.

Exactly! My typical Saturday ride in June, July and August of this year was to ride somewhere nice 75 miles from my home, nonstop. then pause the timer, break for lunch and or sightseeing there, then ride the return either nonstop, or one stop along the way. The break time is my reward for the effort, not part of the effort and doesn't count on the clock in determining average speed.
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Old 01-02-20, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
Or New England.

I consider myself a high mileage rider because I manage to get 7000 miles in in a climate where there are not more than 8 plausible months a year to do high-mileage road riding.
Yep, it's all relative to where you live and the folks you ride with. I rode April thru December with 7800 miles but I can't think of myself as high mileage among my group

Last edited by shelbyfv; 01-02-20 at 10:15 AM. Reason: correct mileage, it's important:)
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Old 01-02-20, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by KC8QVO View Post
I am looking over my ride data from 2019 and am setting a mileage goal for 2020. I know there are people that ride in the 7,000+ mile range in a year out there and I am curious how that is possible.

My average speed came out to 7.012mph for the year. This speed is factored off the trip time on my computer vs total miles. The trip time is somewhat of a bogus number because that largely includes stopped time, yet on some rides I did pause it (for example - fixing a flat I paused the trip timer through that period). So the 7.012mph is not a moving average, it is a time vs distance average across the year.

Using that speed average and saying that an average day's ride is in the 8 hour ballpark, for hitting 7,000 miles for the year that would require a bit over 123 days riding - with a mileage average around 56-57 miles per ride.

How is that humanly possible?

Therein lies my question. Those of you that are riding way up there in miles - what do your numbers show? How are you able to dedicate the time to your riding to achieve those numbers?
I finished with just over 7,400 miles last year. My average speed was around 14 MPH. For me, getting up and riding a couple of hours before work is the only way I can find the time to ride as much as I'd like. Total ride time was around 535 hours.
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Old 01-02-20, 10:13 AM
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Going back to what I think was the original question, I checked Strava for several friends with 10,000 -11,000. They all had about 600 hours +/-. My time was 545 hours for 7800. I'm slow....
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Old 01-02-20, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Yep, it's all relative to where you live and the folks you ride with. I rode April thru December with 7700 miles but I can't think of myself as high mileage among my group

That strikes me as a rather absurd criterion, no matter how much you ride, you'll probably be able to find someone who's doing more.. I'm sure we could come up with a group for whom 10,000 miles is pretty low if we tried. But I'd bet that of people who ride regularly (let's say more than once a week depending on season), the proportion of them that ride as much as you or I do is in the very low single digits.
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Old 01-02-20, 10:58 AM
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The "go anywhere bike"
191 rides
6,636.9 miles
34.7 miles per ride avg.
233,669ft climbed
1,223 avg. ride elevation
403:35:17 ride time
02:06:47 avg. ride duration
16.4mph avg. speed

The "go faster" bike
80 rides
3,642.2 miles
45.5 miles per ride avg.
99,789ft. climbed
1,247ft avg. elevation
197:36:56 ride time
02:28:13 avg. ride duration
18.4mph avg. speed

Total rides: 271
Total dist: 10,335 mi
Total elev: 335,075 ft
Total time: 610:17:26
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Old 01-02-20, 11:29 AM
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I race and commute. (A lot of the racers I know do as well) Most days, one of the commute legs is also an interval session. Race or group ride on Saturday. Sunday, if there’s no race, is usually off or a very mellow ride with my wife.
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Old 01-02-20, 11:47 AM
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I probably rode less than 3000 miles this year, but that's a guess based on my total number of days commuting. I don't track mileage at all, and I rarely ride on weekends, though, except with my wife or mountain biking with a friend. Those weekend miles are insignificant.
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Old 01-02-20, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
I consider myself a high mileage rider because I manage to get 7000 miles in in a climate where there are not more than 8 plausible months a year to do high-mileage road riding.
Good point. I've always been in the same sort of climate, and my biggest years (7000+ miles) required a lot of 200+ mile weeks when the weather was favorable.

At that rate, riding year 'round, I'd have a 10k-11k yearly total...But I don't know that I could maintain that volume for twelve months per year. When riding season winds down in late autumn, I'm usually a bit happy to have some time away from the bike.
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Old 01-02-20, 12:00 PM
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Maybe I should lobby for age groups. My mileage would look much better if compared only to other over 70s
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