Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Standing on the Bike ???

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Standing on the Bike ???

Old 01-19-20, 02:24 PM
  #1  
TheDudeIsHere
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 467
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 186 Post(s)
Liked 267 Times in 159 Posts
Standing on the Bike ???

Are there any other cyclists out there who have a hard time standing on the bike? I have a ride partner who is really awkward standing on the bike. We ride together often and take turns at the front pulling one another. There are a couple of real short steep ramps that we climb and if I am behind him on those sections, WATCHOUT! He stands and doesn't quite rock but also doesn't seem very stable forward, backward, or side to side. Actually scary trying to hold his wheel at times. I have to back off and let him pull away safely then hop back on his wheel when we level out.

Also my wife, she has done 100 miles on her single bike, few centuries on the tandem, and climbed as much as 5,000 ft in 20 miles, and plenty of 2300-4,000 ft climbs all withing 17 miles. Plenty of climbing but she can not stand if her life counted on it. The few centuries we did on the tandem, I would have loved to stand on the climbs (7%) and a local short climb, partial way up Mt Baldy Rd that hits grades of 11%. I've tried to get her to stand, gave her pretty good instructions, but still, she struggles to stand so those tandem climbs can be a struggle. Also can't get the feel for me standing on the tandem while she remains seated.

But it puzzles me. She is very well coordinated in sport activities. Rides really well but can not stand on a bike for snot!

Who here has a problem and why? I am not asking to say anything silly like "I am a dufus", I mean why, as in is it a balance thing? Is it unnerving to some riders?

Well yeah, put a bike stand on the bike and it's easy!

TheDudeIsHere is offline  
Old 01-19-20, 03:23 PM
  #2  
alcjphil
Senior Member
 
alcjphil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 3,778
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 922 Post(s)
Liked 273 Times in 178 Posts
There are lots of people like that. A guy I used to race against was terribly unsteady pedalling out of the saddle to the point that nobody in the pack liked being close to him. He wasn't the only one, there was another guy we used to refer to as the "zig zag machine" for his out of the saddle pedalling style
alcjphil is offline  
Likes For alcjphil:
Old 01-19-20, 03:49 PM
  #3  
bampilot06
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: 757
Posts: 1,548

Bikes: Cervťlo C2

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1313 Post(s)
Liked 597 Times in 254 Posts
It doesnít feel natural when I stand out of the saddle, and typically the only time I am out of the saddle is when crossing a busy intersection, combination of clipping in and trying to cross quickly. I donít have mountains near me, and all of the hills I am able to climb without standing.
bampilot06 is online now  
Likes For bampilot06:
Old 01-19-20, 03:55 PM
  #4  
TheDudeIsHere
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 467
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 186 Post(s)
Liked 267 Times in 159 Posts
Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
There are lots of people like that. A guy I used to race against was terribly unsteady pedalling out of the saddle to the point that nobody in the pack liked being close to him. He wasn't the only one, there was another guy we used to refer to as the "zig zag machine" for his out of the saddle pedalling style

Ah good! So I know it is not all that uncommon. I have many cycling buds and these 2 are about the only 2 I know who have problems so it is good to know it's not a really rare thing.
TheDudeIsHere is offline  
Old 01-19-20, 04:31 PM
  #5  
Trakhak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 2,064
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 529 Post(s)
Liked 177 Times in 127 Posts
A guy I used to train with had a bad habit of jerking the bike backward about 6 inches whenever he stood to accelerate or climb. He was unaware that it was happening. It didn't take him all that long to break the habit once he was, ahem, invited to do so. I would think that anyone, once informed of such a problem, would be able to learn to control the bike better.
Trakhak is offline  
Old 01-19-20, 05:04 PM
  #6  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 11,378

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3623 Post(s)
Liked 1,152 Times in 764 Posts
Standing to pedal takes practice and better conditioning. It's often harder on the leg muscles, especially for folks who can spin fast to compensate for using relatively easier gears. Standing really works the legs.

And some bikes balance better than others for standing. Hybrids and comfort or city bikes with swept or arced riser bars can be trickier than a road bike.

With a road bike it seems to depend on the overall setup between handlebar/stem height relative to the saddle, design and length of the hoods -- assuming the rider is on the hoods for standing. Some folks use the drops. The tops are very difficult to balance on for standing to pedal, partly because it's like using the world's narrowest flat bars -- very twitchy.

I really had to work to be able to stand to pedal. When I first resumed cycling in 2015 I could stand only a few seconds at a time before my legs gave out. Gradually I built up some strength but mostly avoiding it by sitting and spinning. Last year I finally switched methods from spinning to mashing harder gears and forcing myself to stand to pedal longer distances. On a good day I can stand to pedal from 1/4 to 1/2 mile on gradual inclines. On one really exceptional day in December I stood to climb most of a 1.2 mile hill, sitting only a couple of times for a few seconds where the hill flattened out briefly. I couldn't repeat that yesterday on the same hill.

My balance is pretty good. I check my on-bike video cameras and I don't rock much. But I worked at it a lot to be smooth in group rides.

Speaking of which, don't draft someone who stands to climb. Watch the pros. Even they drop back a bit when following a rider who stands to climb. If you're close enough that the other guy's rocking bothers you, you're too close. Even if it means losing the draft or getting dropped on fast group rides, I won't ride too close beside or behind someone with sketchy bike handling. Sometimes they're stronger and faster so I can't simply stay ahead of them either. Some rides ya just gotta choose between hanging on despite the risks or bailing out and riding safely.

It's hard to convince casual cyclists to endure the burning muscle pain it takes to get stronger at standing to pedal. Sorta takes the fun out of it for casual cyclists who are just in it for some low stress exercise. I wouldn't try to push anyone into "getting stronger." Their own goals will motivate them. If their goal is to just relax and enjoy the ride, there won't be much motivation to endure the burning muscles and sore legs the next couple of days.
canklecat is offline  
Likes For canklecat:
Old 01-19-20, 05:08 PM
  #7  
badger1
Senior Member
 
badger1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Southwestern Ontario
Posts: 4,306
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1128 Post(s)
Liked 236 Times in 147 Posts
Interesting.

I suppose in some instances it might be a 'balance' issue, but I'm sure that in others it's a 'set up' and/or technique issue.

On the first: one needs one's bars somewhat 'forward' (reach) and 'down' (saddle to bar drop) in order to ensure that the transition from seated to standing pedalling is a balanced transition. Standing on the pedals and climbing on a 'Dutch' bike, for example -- a sit-up-n-beg position when seated -- is not a natural position.

On the second: I suspect many folks forget or don't realize that one needs to drop a gear or two to maintain fluidity. When standing, one is adding one's body weight to pedalling force, and so a slightly 'harder' gear in relation to climbing the same grade seated is appropriate.
badger1 is offline  
Old 01-19-20, 05:36 PM
  #8  
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 6,211

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1823 Post(s)
Liked 472 Times in 257 Posts
Mountain biking is a great way to learn and practise how to ride while standing on the pedals. The nature of mountain biking is such that it forces you to get out of the saddle very often especially when riding on technical terrain.
wolfchild is offline  
Likes For wolfchild:
Old 01-19-20, 06:15 PM
  #9  
CAT7RDR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Hacienda Hgts
Posts: 701

Bikes: 1999 Schwinn Peloton Ultegra 10, Kestrel RT-1000 Ultegra, Trek Marlin 6 Deore 29'er

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 236 Post(s)
Liked 392 Times in 231 Posts
I tore my right tricep and right rotatorcuff. That was my dominant side and is now my weak side. I have the leg and core strength but not the right shoulder strength to stand and press for long periods. I can usually stand and pedal up an incline for about 60 strokes before I have to sit because I can no longer hold my weight on the right side.

I once was able to complete sets of push-ups totaling 300 now I struggle to do 40. Really sucks when trying to be a better climber.
CAT7RDR is online now  
Old 01-19-20, 06:40 PM
  #10  
55murray
Senior Member
 
55murray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Lafayette, Indiana
Posts: 387

Bikes: 1955 20" Murray modified cruiser, 2007 Trek 7.3 FX, 1980 Miyata 610, several other vintage coaster brake machines

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 177 Post(s)
Liked 40 Times in 28 Posts
I certainly have cycling weak spots, but if you can't stand on your machine I would think you would work on it until you could...
55murray is offline  
Likes For 55murray:
Old 01-19-20, 08:41 PM
  #11  
JanMM
rebmeM roineS
 
JanMM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Metro Indy, IN
Posts: 15,868

Bikes: RANS V3 ti, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 562 Post(s)
Liked 177 Times in 117 Posts
Gosh, I've tried and tried, but am totally unable to get up out of the seat while riding this bike..........................I'll keep working on it.

__________________
RANS V3 Ti, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
JanMM is offline  
Old 01-19-20, 09:20 PM
  #12  
smashndash
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 966

Bikes: 2017 Specialized Allez Sprint Comp

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 575 Post(s)
Liked 158 Times in 116 Posts
There are two main components to standing that could be the issue.

The first is the fact that taking weight off the saddle means it has to go somewhere. In a hard sprint, itís going to the pedals. A lazy climb, itís going onto your hands. This is *significantly* harder on your body. Some people have the cardio and the muscular endurance to put down respectable power all day, but lack the torque necessary to stand up. Or, they may lack the upper body strength to support a big chunk of their body weight on their hands.

The second is the handling aspect. Putting more weight on the bars changes how your bike handles. It can also be very off-putting to people who are afraid of flying OTB. Then, of course, you have the rocking aspect. Unless you want to get a ridiculous isometric arm and back workout (most casual cyclists do not have the strength to do this), the bike needs to rock at least a little. Enough to counteract the pedal torque you are putting down.

Besides good instruction, some solid calisthenic or even weightlifting exercises can make a world of difference when it comes to command of the bike.
smashndash is offline  
Old 01-19-20, 09:23 PM
  #13  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 24,565
Mentioned: 195 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11517 Post(s)
Liked 939 Times in 729 Posts
Your friend with the bike flopping around. How does he feel about standing?

Perhaps that is simply the way he rides. One may, or may not keep the bike on centerline, and it may not matter a lot.
CliffordK is offline  
Old 01-19-20, 10:03 PM
  #14  
Gresp15C
Senior Member
 
Gresp15C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 3,081
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 786 Post(s)
Liked 209 Times in 153 Posts
Could it be something subtle about the geometry of the bike?
Gresp15C is offline  
Old 01-19-20, 10:12 PM
  #15  
dedhed
SE Wis
 
dedhed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 6,622

Bikes: '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1245 Post(s)
Liked 645 Times in 442 Posts
I know my knees don't like it any more
dedhed is offline  
Old 01-19-20, 10:30 PM
  #16  
wipekitty
vespertine member
 
wipekitty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: from sea to shining sea!
Posts: 2,430

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 671 Post(s)
Liked 195 Times in 148 Posts
I'm not great at standing on the bike - it's a work in progress. I rarely feel the need to stand on a climb and am generally faster grinding it out while seated (though short steep rollers, sprints, and single speed rides are a different story.)

I generally let my riding companions know that I will alert them when I intend to stand, with enough time to back off the wheel a bit, then call out 'standing!' when I intend to get out of the saddle. Some of my fellow riders do the same.
wipekitty is offline  
Old 01-19-20, 11:07 PM
  #17  
u235
Senior Member
 
u235's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 1,133
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 411 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 64 Posts
Originally Posted by smashndash View Post
There are two main components to standing that could be the issue.

The first is the fact that taking weight off the saddle means it has to go somewhere. In a hard sprint, it’s going to the pedals. A lazy climb, it’s going onto your hands. This is *significantly* harder on your body. Some people have the cardio and the muscular endurance to put down respectable power all day, but lack the torque necessary to stand up. Or, they may lack the upper body strength to support a big chunk of their body weight on their hands.

The second is the handling aspect. Putting more weight on the bars changes how your bike handles. It can also be very off-putting to people who are afraid of flying OTB. Then, of course, you have the rocking aspect. Unless you want to get a ridiculous isometric arm and back workout (most casual cyclists do not have the strength to do this), the bike needs to rock at least a little. Enough to counteract the pedal torque you are putting down.

Besides good instruction, some solid calisthenic or even weightlifting exercises can make a world of difference when it comes to command of the bike.
I frequently stand (not including the MTB which is a lot more), climbing and just for a break at times, even loaded up with bags and rack. I don't know about weight being transferred to the hands. I don't feel that or at least don't notice it. The weight is transferred from your butt to your leg/foot to the pedal and as you pedal it moves over to the other leg/foot. Even on a slower pace and low cadence just for a break from sitting I don't feel it on my hands. Rocking most definitely feel, you have to or it will not work. I'd assume the rocking is the hangup of what is tripping people up and that is not in their muscle memory or maybe fighting it or just plain not comfortable with that concept. Maybe try just coasting and standing first, then add leaning to a side transferring weight around to different sides by tilting the bike and eventually pedal doing that? Or just don't stand if you don't want to, nothing wrong with that either.

Last edited by u235; 01-19-20 at 11:25 PM.
u235 is offline  
Likes For u235:
Old 01-19-20, 11:51 PM
  #18  
TheDudeIsHere
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 467
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 186 Post(s)
Liked 267 Times in 159 Posts
Originally Posted by u235 View Post
I'd assume the rocking is the hangup of what is tripping people up and that is not in their muscle memory or maybe fighting it or just plain not comfortable with that concept. Maybe try just coasting and standing first, then add leaning to a side transferring weight around to different sides by tilting the bike and eventually pedal doing that? Or just don't stand if you don't want to, nothing wrong with that either.
I actually think that this is the issue wit my wife. I've shown her how I stand, counter balance with each stroke and chest straight up as if jogging. I do rock some to get an even standing cadence.

But she says she can't do the rocking thing and if she stands straight up without rocking, it is very awkward to her. I think she is also uneasy with her hands moving along with the bars while rocking.

But no way does she lack the power in the legs.
TheDudeIsHere is offline  
Old 01-20-20, 12:51 AM
  #19  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 8,344

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn, Lakitu

Mentioned: 118 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4731 Post(s)
Liked 1,402 Times in 816 Posts
My wife doesn't like to pedal while standing. I have not pressed the issue. I generally won't pedal while standing for more than a mile or two at a time. Anything approaching 10 minutes, I just feel like sitting down.
__________________
DrIsotope is online now  
Old 01-20-20, 05:09 AM
  #20  
Gconan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 610

Bikes: Norco search xr

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 123 Times in 75 Posts
I could not very well until I got good support pedals with good platforms . With large or better platforms I can stand up much longer.

Gconan is offline  
Old 01-20-20, 05:11 AM
  #21  
Gconan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 610

Bikes: Norco search xr

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 123 Times in 75 Posts
Gconan is offline  
Likes For Gconan:
Old 01-20-20, 05:11 AM
  #22  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 26,983
Mentioned: 192 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11405 Post(s)
Liked 3,047 Times in 1,695 Posts
No.
indyfabz is offline  
Likes For indyfabz:
Old 01-20-20, 05:13 AM
  #23  
Gconan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 610

Bikes: Norco search xr

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 123 Times in 75 Posts
Gconan is offline  
Old 01-20-20, 05:56 AM
  #24  
livedarklions
Cogs in back, right?
 
livedarklions's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: New England
Posts: 7,370

Bikes: Serotta Atlanta; 1994 Specialized Allez Pro; Motobecane Fantom CX; Giant OCR A1

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3824 Post(s)
Liked 2,587 Times in 1,487 Posts
Originally Posted by Gconan View Post

I always thought the idea that foot position should be the same whether standing or sitting makes no sense.
livedarklions is online now  
Likes For livedarklions:
Old 01-20-20, 06:51 AM
  #25  
Mosyosalyangoz
Road Cyclist
 
Mosyosalyangoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Turkey / istanbul
Posts: 200

Bikes: Corelli Kr 100

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 18 Posts
Yes. There is a big problem when there is violence (especially when going uphill)
Mosyosalyangoz is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.