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1 bike in your quiver

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1 bike in your quiver

Old 02-03-20, 05:10 PM
  #1  
glenymact
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1 bike in your quiver

Hi all, i own a couple of bikes and have urges to own n+infinity bikes, but in the spirit of saving my wallet, storage space, and personal relationships its more practical for me to daydream of the perfect do anything bike. So i figured i'd ask the BF community what they are using for a do anything bike or an n-1 style bike.

I am using this bike:

Currently i have a 2018 fargo gx which is fulfilling that role quite well at the moment. It started as my bikepacking bike and has quickly become my road bike, mountain bike, and commuter. I put a super long and steep stem upside down in order to achieve an slight drop from seat to bars when its in road mode along with a different set of wheels that have slick tires so that i can usually keep up on any group ride. Recently I have been debating adding a 100mm travel front forks and making my own custom handlebars that can bridge the gap between road bars and flats in order to make it more capable offroad. When i talk about this to my riding buddies they say why bother just get a different bike. They have a point in that the bike only fufills all these roles because i switch out stems, bars, forks etc. it takes a bit of time but i get a certain satisfaction making 1 bike do it all. Obviously i am not going to be the fastest i can be on roads without buying a dedicated road bike, nor handle the best off road without buying a full sus mtb, but its really fun using 1 bike for everything.
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Old 02-03-20, 06:35 PM
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1992 StumpJumper FS, minus the FS. Put on thick-ish slicks (I go 1.4 or 1.5 inch) and a rack. It's my "ride to work" bike (I don't do it quite often enough to call myself a commuter) for my 10-mile ride to work. Last year, I decided to go up into the mountains here in Southern California, and kind of forgot that I didn't have knobbies. It really wasn't an issue on a nice buffed singletrack. I biffed a couple of times, but I think that was more a matter of my rusty bike-handling skills on dirt. I also spent over five weeks touring on it, fully loaded, spending about a week of that on US Forest Service dirt roads. I used Avocet Cross tires (2.4 inch with an inverted tread) for that tour. No flats, broken spokes or trouble of any kind.

But I'm bad at (big) maintenance, and have let the bottom bracket go for too long. I'm starting to think seriously about replacing the Stump. I will probably look at the Surly touring bikes. I'd like another flat-bar, 26" wheel, triple-chainring steel beauty with rim brakes. You'd think that wouldn't be hard, right?

Oh, just re-read the part in your post about the handlebars. You may want to look at the Jones H-bar or something. A flat-bar with bar ends suits my needs quite well, but lots of options out there now. Good luck, let us know how you come out.
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Old 02-03-20, 07:00 PM
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I currently only own Double Cross Disc 2017, built up from a frame with 3x9. Good for city riding, road, gravel, some touring (did C&O and GAP on it). Not made for technical MTB trails.

I do not tweak it much except that I left the steerer uncut which allows me to raise the bars on multi-day tours.
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Old 02-03-20, 08:13 PM
  #4  
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18 years ago I'd had a custom Harry Havnoonian cyclocross frameset welded up which used a road racing geometry for head and seattube, had a raised BB and slightly longer stays. Straight bladed fork and 853 tubing with wall tubing that was more for a MTB. Only wish I'd thought to ask for disc brakes at the time and when I did it was too late, they'd just finished it and didn't want to redo the stays, but discs weren't as popular or readily available then anyways. It could easily fit a 700x45mm tire and I had no problem running it on MTB trails. At the time there wasn't as much out about rim widths so the rims were narrow but it excelled at road, cross, mtb and crushed it on the local unpaved rail trails. That same frame today built with modern wide rims, disc brakes, and gravel components would only be better and faster. The fork had enough height that it might have taken an 80mm fork with no problem though none really existed for 700c and it is probably the closest I ever came to a one size fits all type of bike.
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Old 02-03-20, 09:21 PM
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It would be like the 3T Exploro but with 29 x 2.1 wheels and tires, low Q-factor 46/30 x 11-40. Or maybe like the Kona Sutra LTD but with 853-ish steel. Sutra has clearance for mud-caked tires. Needs to have a low front with plenty of bar drop.

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Old 02-03-20, 10:35 PM
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I don't think it's reasonable to expect a bike to be 100% good at everything. The Fargo splits the difference really well. If you were going to get a roadier bike I think you'd also want an offroadier bike.
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Old 02-03-20, 10:45 PM
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If I have one bike where I have to change the stem, bars, and forks to "do anything' I really don't have one bike that does everything ... I have three bikes: one sucks on the road, one sucks off the road, and one takes up riding time doing conversions.

Seriously, if you are fine with doing all that just to Not buy a bike which does something better ... go for it. You have your way. Bravo. I wouldn't but I am not you and you are not me. Do what works for you.

When you get into changing forks, and rewiring brakes .... that is Waaay over the top for me. You can make a Cadillac into a camper, but it won't be either, really. And in the space you need to store spare parts and do the work ... you could store a second bike.

But that's just me. if it works for you ... end of conversation. It's your bike, do it however you like.

I'd certainly look at available trekking bars before trying to make my own. Steel would be hard to bend, and aluminum might need heat-treating ...... and there are companies which make dedicated trekking bars which offer a wealth of hand positions .... and you can take them off and flip them over if you like.
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Old 02-03-20, 10:50 PM
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If forced to do so, this bike

Untitled by Stuart Black, on Flickr

Or this bike

_IMG4973 by Stuart Black, on Flickr

Would be the only one I’d own. The first one is a Specialized Epic which has a “Brain” rear shock that locks out when pedaling and goes active when it hits a bump. It’s not as fast as a road bike on pavement but it works well enough. I actually have a Specialized Epic in Tucson as my only bike at my daughter’s house. I have mine at home for trail riding.

The other bike is a Moots YBB that has a little bit of shock on the rear (about an inch of travel) that makes it work well enough for off-road riding but it is a bit active for smooth road riding. It works well enough and it can be used for bikepacking

2020-01-26 16:51:13 by Stuart Black, on Flickr

Thankfully, I don’t have to have just one.
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Old 02-03-20, 10:57 PM
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I converted a MTB to touring, but found the geometry was too twitchy under heavy loads, so it is now my all purpose bike, plus loaner bike. I even have an extra set of wheels with enduro tires ready to go
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Old 02-04-20, 12:29 AM
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We have 7 bikes, down from 11. To have one bike would be a nightmare for me. thank goodness I have a wife who loves to ride as well. AND thinks that the garage is no place for the bikes to hang out so they have their own room.

I 'm getting woozy just thinking about limiting myself to one bike.
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Old 02-04-20, 04:38 AM
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I have 3 road bikes and 1 cross bike. For the riding I do, I'd say the cross bike would be my "do everything" bike. It's a Colnago World Cup CX. The down side is it's heavier and, once in shape, I'd run out of top end because of the CX gearing.

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Old 02-04-20, 06:52 AM
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If I were limited to only one bike...

...my world would become much, much smaller as a result. This thought saddens me. Death will come soon...
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Old 02-04-20, 07:43 AM
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my new GUNNAR i got last year. if my wife says I can only have one bike, this is it.
i'm not sure why she would, on account she's a reasonable person who understands important things, like having just one more bike!


CrossHairs with Rim Brakes
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Old 02-04-20, 11:23 AM
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If I had only 1 bike it would be a build based on my Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross frame thats currently set up as a touring/commuting bike, or it would be based on my current Fairlight Secan gravel frame.

The Fairlight Secan has road geometry for frame angles, bb drop, and fork trail, it has mounts for fenders and a rear rack, and can fit 700x47mm tires.
I could happily use it as a paved road bike, gravel bike, commuter, touring bike, and twisty river bottom singletrack.

The gearing on it would work as is for road, gravel, and commuting, but I would want to change tires if it were used more for paved road. And gearing would need to change if it were used for loaded touring, but that wouldnt to switch a few times a year for the trips.

stock pic from company-


pic of mine from solo gravel ride last fall-
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Old 02-04-20, 11:42 AM
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I was hoping to have a do-anything bicycle - a bicycle that would allow me to engage the 52+t chainring to blaze down the road but also have the facility to tow a trailer up a hill - but later discovered that gearing systems do not accommodate versatility such as this. The feeling of inspiration is gone so I settled for being able to tow trailer up hill. Oh well. With having to buy an additional bicycle for the "road" in order to get my other facilitation, now I can also buy some spandex to show how dedicated I am. Bicycle industry 1, Nyah 0.
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Old 02-04-20, 11:49 AM
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If forced to pare things down, I could maybe get away with 2-3 bikes. Down to one? I understand the individual words; but strung together in a single sentence they make no sense.
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Old 02-04-20, 12:21 PM
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Yeah just one bike makes no sense at all. Life is too short for just one bike, i mean i have multiple folding bikes which likely makes no sense whatsoever but to me a 16" wheel feels so different from a 20" and dahon's are a ton of fun. I also agree that it makes no sense to convert a bike from mountain mode to road mode, but a frame that is capable of that excites me. Maybe someone needs to design a bike that goes from road mode to mountain mode as quickly as a folding bike can fold. We would have to call it a transformer bike!!!
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Old 02-04-20, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Nyah View Post
I was hoping to have a do-anything bicycle - a bicycle that would allow me to engage the 52+t chainring to blaze down the road but also have the facility to tow a trailer up a hill - but later discovered that gearing systems do not accommodate versatility such as this. The feeling of inspiration is gone so I settled for being able to tow trailer up hill. Oh well. With having to buy an additional bicycle for the "road" in order to get my other facilitation, now I can also buy some spandex to show how dedicated I am. Bicycle industry 1, Nyah 0.
I hear triples have the range you seek...
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Old 02-04-20, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
I hear triples have the range you seek...
My understanding is that the difference between largest and smallest chainrings cannot exceed 22 teeth. Thus with a 52t chainring, the front derailer can't use anything smaller than a 30t, thus not facilitating the towing of trailer up hills.
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Old 02-04-20, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Nyah View Post
My understanding is that the difference between largest and smallest chainrings cannot exceed 22 teeth. Thus with a 52t chainring, the front derailer can't use anything smaller than a 30t, thus not facilitating the towing of trailer up hills.
What is the mystery surrounding this "52T Chainring", as if it were the Holy Grail or Buddha's Tooth?

You can change chainrings according to the BCD of the crankset. In fact, you can change cranksets.

At 110 rpms, your 52 x 11 combination yields 40 miles per hour. Are you still pedaling then? Go down to a 46, and raise your rpms to 120, and you can still do 39+ mph. Plenty fast for pedaling...

Also, note to the original concept of "one bike". This would be okay for "one type" of riding, such as commuting, or fast recreational riding, or single track mountain biking, or endurance riding, or touring, or road crits, or track racing. Pick your type of riding, and then pick your bike.
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Old 02-04-20, 01:31 PM
  #21  
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1 bike? No, just no.
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Old 02-04-20, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
What is the mystery surrounding this "52T Chainring", as if it were the Holy Grail or Buddha's Tooth?
Mystery surrounding 52t chainring? I have no idea where you're getting that from. I've been talking about how the limitation of bicycle gearing systems prevents me from having a bicycle that does everything I want a road bicycle to do. What did you think was more appropriate to talk about in a thread about owning a single bicycle that serves many functions?
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Old 02-04-20, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Nyah View Post
My understanding is that the difference between largest and smallest chainrings cannot exceed 22 teeth. Thus with a 52t chainring, the front derailer can't use anything smaller than a 30t, thus not facilitating the towing of trailer up hills.
Admittedly, I half-ignored the 52t ring as an actual necessity since 52/11 is absurd for all but the most talented/herculean among us. You are moving at 33.5mph in that gearing at 90rpm. That cant be held for long by most enthusiasts and on downhills, tuck and save energy at that point if you want to go faster.

But even if a 52t is 'needed', it could be paired with 42t and 30t rings. Throw an M591 RD on back and mate it to a 9sp 11-34 cassette. That will be within the specs for all components(even though you can exceed chainwrap and large cog capacities by a couple teeth without issue). You have a 30/34 bailout gear which is a very capable 23.28 gear inches for touring.
And again- this excluded the reality that an 11-36 cassette could be used without issue for even more bailout.


theoreticals are fun.
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Old 02-04-20, 03:01 PM
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I draw the line at a wheel swap. If it needs more than a wheel swap, then there's just too much hassle.

I think most people can suit all their needs on 3 bikes or less.

I own 5.
Race/TT bike.
Rain/fast road/gravel bike.
Travel/utility/tour/commuter bike.
Singletrack Mountain bike.
Vintage/fun/show bike.

But 1 bike? I dunno. I've heard of such a thing but I don't think it's possible.
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Old 02-04-20, 03:15 PM
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Three; three bikes is the proper number (for me).
On pavement/commuter


Off pavement



TBD


Such a pretty paint job.
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