Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

New chain test from Lennard Zinn / Velo News

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

New chain test from Lennard Zinn / Velo News

Old 02-15-20, 12:36 PM
  #1  
studbike1
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
New chain test from Lennard Zinn / Velo News

Looks like nobody has posted this yet:

https://www.velonews.com/2020/01/gea...e-found_504284
studbike1 is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 12:41 PM
  #2  
studbike1
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I agree with shimano in terms of the test having limited translation to the real world. Even if you increase the average speed to 12mph, most of these chains only lasted about 1000 miles, and everyone who rides a lot knows that a chain should last at least twice that long with minimal lubrication, and will go longer if you maintain it frequently.

Also it looks like the campy chain got something wrong towards the beginning of the test. the slope of the curve is similar to the winning connex chain.
studbike1 is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 01:46 PM
  #3  
Sy Reene
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 6,218

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3156 Post(s)
Liked 500 Times in 367 Posts
Unfortunately, for whatever reason, Campy got the short end of the stick re: the value judgement. Every other brand had some pricepoint options (value to high end) tested.. For whatever reason, this seems always be the case .. never includes the potenza/centaur level (nor even Chorus in this test).

Also worth noting how curious it is that different testing orgs can come up with results sometimes at odds with each other, eg from ZeroFriction's tests
Attached Files
File Type: pdf
chainlongevitypg1.pdf (286.8 KB, 12 views)
Sy Reene is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 02:20 PM
  #4  
Sy Reene
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 6,218

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3156 Post(s)
Liked 500 Times in 367 Posts
Originally Posted by studbike1 View Post
Looks like nobody has posted this yet:

https://www.velonews.com/2020/01/gea...e-found_504284
Seriously.. who is the Connex spokesman..?
"...For a chick-magnet like the 11sB chain, I think this is a small price to pay..."
Sy Reene is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 02:53 PM
  #5  
DaveSSS
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 5,960

Bikes: TWO Colnago C-RS w/Chorus 12

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 474 Post(s)
Liked 182 Times in 146 Posts
I suspect that the application of excessive abrasives reduces all chain lives significantly. If that had not been done, the testing might have taken 3-4 times as long. I wanted to test Jobst Brandt's contention that as long as a chain wasn't used beyond 1% elongation, the mating sprockets would not be damaged. I rode a Campy 10 chain for 6,000 miles or 350 hours and measured no more than .25% elongation over the full length. Although the elongation was small, rollers had a very large amount of wear, especially on the hole in the roller and the side clearance was twice that of a new chain. The two most used sprockets, my 19 and 21 both skipped with a new chain. That proved that with this chain elongation was irrelevant, compared to roller wear.

I recently checked a KMC x11.93 chain against my chorus 11 chains with similar mileage and found the KMC to have at least .3% elongation, while the campy chains were nearly like new.

The only difference between a record and chorus chain, that I know of is the hollow pins on the record model.
DaveSSS is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 03:17 PM
  #6  
Sy Reene
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 6,218

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3156 Post(s)
Liked 500 Times in 367 Posts
Originally Posted by DaveSSS View Post

The only difference between a record and chorus chain, that I know of is the hollow pins on the record model.
That's what I've heard.. so of course wondering how the Potenza level chains perform/hold up.
Sy Reene is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 04:25 PM
  #7  
August West
Senior Member
 
August West's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 403

Bikes: Domane SLR7 Project One. Fuel EX 8 GX

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 135 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 83 Posts
A quick check of online prices in USA and I don't see the Connex chain for anywhere close to the price they are using (11sX for $58.99, not $47) while all the Shimano chains are available for way less than they are showing (DA for $35.34, not $44). Kind of invalidates the cost results IMHO. To the point it really doesn't make much a difference to me even with waxing them and running 3 chains in rotation.
August West is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 04:32 PM
  #8  
asgelle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 4,007
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 625 Post(s)
Liked 157 Times in 100 Posts
Originally Posted by studbike1 View Post
Here is a copy of the text. hope this is kosher.
About as kosher as breaking into my house and taking my TV.

That IP doesn't belong to you and isn't yours to post wherever you want.
asgelle is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 04:46 PM
  #9  
cb400bill
Inoxidable Moderator
 
cb400bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Kalamazoo MI
Posts: 18,276

Bikes: Fuji SL 2.1, Cannondale Synapse, Trek 710

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1996 Post(s)
Liked 1,472 Times in 911 Posts
We have deleted the article as posting the full article breaks the Fair Use rules. Posting the link, and maybe a paragraph from the article is okay, but not the full text.
cb400bill is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 05:29 PM
  #10  
Sy Reene
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 6,218

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3156 Post(s)
Liked 500 Times in 367 Posts
Originally Posted by August West View Post
A quick check of online prices in USA and I don't see the Connex chain for anywhere close to the price they are using (11sX for $58.99, not $47) while all the Shimano chains are available for way less than they are showing (DA for $35.34, not $44). Kind of invalidates the cost results IMHO. To the point it really doesn't make much a difference to me even with waxing them and running 3 chains in rotation.
Actually, from what I can tell, the pricing matches somewhat closely to what they indicated.. Realize that they used Amazon as the sole source of online pricing however.

[EDIT] Sorry, my mistake.. I hastily assumed the "X" in 11sX was meant to stand for any letter that might designate eg. a color

Last edited by Sy Reene; 02-15-20 at 05:45 PM.
Sy Reene is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 07:05 PM
  #11  
San Rensho 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 5,820
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 383 Post(s)
Liked 130 Times in 88 Posts
I don't understand the overthinking. If you have an 11 speed cassette, that means that you've spent a lot of money on your bike. And have a lot of money to spend. So just buy a chain measuring device, measure your chain regularly, and then buy the cheapest chain, which is probably a KMC which is a very good product and just replace it There was that that hard?
__________________
Il faut de l'audace, encore de l'audace, toujours de l'audace

1980 3Rensho-- 1975 Raleigh Sprite 3spd
1990s Raleigh M20 MTB--2007 Windsor Hour (track)
1988 Ducati 750 F1
San Rensho is offline  
Likes For San Rensho:
Old 02-15-20, 07:55 PM
  #12  
wgscott
Occam's Rotor
 
wgscott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 6,368
Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2366 Post(s)
Liked 1,477 Times in 746 Posts
Originally Posted by San Rensho View Post
I don't understand the overthinking. If you have an 11 speed cassette, that means that you've spent a lot of money on your bike. And have a lot of money to spend. So just buy a chain measuring device, measure your chain regularly, and then buy the cheapest chain, which is probably a KMC which is a very good product and just replace it There was that that hard?
I can't speak for others, but my primary concern is limiting the amount of wear my chain imparts on the chainrings and cassette. So I spend a little more and get XTR/Dura Ace, and I use wax because it doesn't attract sand and create grinding paste on my chain.
wgscott is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 08:25 PM
  #13  
rm -rf
don't try this at home.
 
rm -rf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: N. KY
Posts: 5,187
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 673 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 44 Posts
The article mentioned 0.75% elongation. I try to keep it at 1/16 inch in 12 inches, measured with a steel ruler. (It's kind of difficult to be accurate: you have to look straight at the ruler lines, measure against the edge of the pin, and hold the other end in place without moving.) 12 1/16 is 12.0625 inches, or .0625%.

Originally Posted by studbike1 View Post
I agree with shimano in terms of the test having limited translation to the real world. Even if you increase the average speed to 12mph, most of these chains only lasted about 1000 miles, and everyone who rides a lot knows that a chain should last at least twice that long with minimal lubrication, and will go longer if you maintain it frequently.

Also it looks like the campy chain got something wrong towards the beginning of the test. the slope of the curve is similar to the winning connex chain.
They were doing the equivalent of a 150 pound rider only riding up an 8% grades at 8 mph, 90 rpm, with muddy water on the chain. 1000 miles would be reasonable!

Originally Posted by DaveSSS View Post
I suspect that the application of excessive abrasives reduces all chain lives significantly. If that had not been done, the testing might have taken 3-4 times as long. I wanted to test Jobst Brandt's contention that as long as a chain wasn't used beyond 1% elongation, the mating sprockets would not be damaged. I rode a Campy 10 chain for 6,000 miles or 350 hours and measured no more than .25% elongation over the full length. Although the elongation was small, rollers had a very large amount of wear, especially on the hole in the roller and the side clearance was twice that of a new chain. The two most used sprockets, my 19 and 21 both skipped with a new chain. That proved that with this chain elongation was irrelevant, compared to roller wear.

I recently checked a KMC x11.93 chain against my chorus 11 chains with similar mileage and found the KMC to have at least .3% elongation, while the campy chains were nearly like new.

The only difference between a record and chorus chain, that I know of is the hollow pins on the record model.
Yes, my Campagnolo 10 speed chains had extremely low elongation, even after 3500-4000 miles. But the chains seemed to have a lot more flex side-to-side. I didn't notice much cassette wear. I tended to replace the chain around 3500 miles before going on a biking vacation, just to not worry about riding an older chain out of town.

I wonder how the rollers can get this worn without showing much chain elongation.
rm -rf is offline  
Old 02-15-20, 08:40 PM
  #14  
randallr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Broomfield, Colorado
Posts: 342

Bikes: 2017 Gunnar CrossHairs Rohloff

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Liked 31 Times in 24 Posts
I run the Connex 8SX and am a big fan. Really lowers maintenance for me, very durable and I really like the way the connex link works when it's time to take the chain apart to remove it. I've had a lot more trouble taking apart a SRAM chain when it's due for a change due to corrosion, ended up having to use the chain tool to take it apart at a regular link.
randallr is offline  
Old 02-16-20, 08:57 AM
  #15  
DaveSSS
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 5,960

Bikes: TWO Colnago C-RS w/Chorus 12

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 474 Post(s)
Liked 182 Times in 146 Posts
A 12 inch precision ruler is best used with the chain off the bike, after it's cleaned. Just place one end on the edge of a pin. If the pin at the other end is almost half exposed, you have reached 0.5% elongation. A full half pin would be close to about 0.6%.

I have a 9/64 inch hole drilled in the top of a work bench and another 53.5 inches away. A 10D framing nail will fit snugly in the hole to hold one end of the chain. The hole at the opposite end is the length of a new chain, without the quick link. If it was 53.75 inches away, it would represent a wear of just less than .5%. I prefer to tape a 6 inch precision ruler with the center at 53.5 inches so I can measure chains of several different lengths.

Campy says to use vernier calipers and measure between the rollers. A new chain measures 131.6mm. They say to replace the chain at 132.6mm, which is a .76% increase in length, but since it's measured between rollers, most of the length increase is roller wear, not an increase in chain pitch.
DaveSSS is offline  
Old 02-16-20, 09:41 AM
  #16  
San Rensho 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 5,820
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 383 Post(s)
Liked 130 Times in 88 Posts
Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
I can't speak for others, but my primary concern is limiting the amount of wear my chain imparts on the chainrings and cassette. So I spend a little more and get XTR/Dura Ace, and I use wax because it doesn't attract sand and create grinding paste on my chain.
I go through at least 15 chains before I have to replace a cassette and even more chains before I have to replace the chainrings. In fact, the last time I had to replace the cassette was because I let ran a chain that was beyond spec and it messed up the cassette. If I had replaced it, I probably could have gotten a few more chains out of it. In other words, cassettes and chainrings last almost forever if you replace the chain well within the wear limit.
__________________
Il faut de l'audace, encore de l'audace, toujours de l'audace

1980 3Rensho-- 1975 Raleigh Sprite 3spd
1990s Raleigh M20 MTB--2007 Windsor Hour (track)
1988 Ducati 750 F1
San Rensho is offline  
Likes For San Rensho:
Old 02-16-20, 09:58 AM
  #17  
DaveSSS
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 5,960

Bikes: TWO Colnago C-RS w/Chorus 12

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 474 Post(s)
Liked 182 Times in 146 Posts
Originally Posted by San Rensho View Post
I go through at least 15 chains before I have to replace a cassette and even more chains before I have to replace the chainrings. In fact, the last time I had to replace the cassette was because I let ran a chain that was beyond spec and it messed up the cassette. If I had replaced it, I probably could have gotten a few more chains out of it. In other words, cassettes and chainrings last almost forever if you replace the chain well within the wear limit.
Any idea of how many miles you get per chain? There has to be a point where tossing chains too soon costs far more than replacing a chain or chain rings. I read all sorts of conflicting reports. One person claims that his small sprockets wear out very quickly, so he uses cheap Miche sprockets that can be replaced individually. I've ever experienced that. Others claim maybe only 12000 miles from chain rings. I've never experienced that either.

15 chains might cost $300-600, unless you're the person referring to $10 chains for his vintage 5 to 7 speed bikes.

Last edited by DaveSSS; 02-16-20 at 11:41 AM.
DaveSSS is offline  
Old 02-16-20, 10:02 AM
  #18  
wgscott
Occam's Rotor
 
wgscott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 6,368
Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2366 Post(s)
Liked 1,477 Times in 746 Posts
Originally Posted by San Rensho View Post
I go through at least 15 chains before I have to replace a cassette and even more chains before I have to replace the chainrings. In fact, the last time I had to replace the cassette was because I let ran a chain that was beyond spec and it messed up the cassette. If I had replaced it, I probably could have gotten a few more chains out of it. In other words, cassettes and chainrings last almost forever if you replace the chain well within the wear limit.
Is that with modern 11-speed components, like Ultegra? If so, that is truly remarkable (assuming you aren't replacing your chain every 300 miles). I'm lucky to get two seasons out of a cassette, and average 4 chains (in rotation). I've also had to replace an inner chainring after 2 years (before I started waxing).
wgscott is offline  
Old 02-16-20, 10:09 AM
  #19  
WizardOfBoz
Generally bewildered
 
WizardOfBoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Eastern PA, USA
Posts: 2,792

Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane 6.9, 1999 LeMond Zurich, 1978 Schwinn Superior

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1040 Post(s)
Liked 243 Times in 180 Posts
Originally Posted by rm -rf View Post
The article mentioned 0.75% elongation. I try to keep it at 1/16 inch in 12 inches, measured with a steel ruler. (It's kind of difficult to be accurate: you have to look straight at the ruler lines, measure against the edge of the pin, and hold the other end in place without moving.) 12 1/16 is 12.0625 inches, or .0625%.
Respectfully, 1/16 inch is 0.0625 inches. 0.0625 inches divided by 12 inches is fractional 0.0052, which to convert to percentage we multiply by 100% to give 0.52%.

If you were using 0.0625% as your criteria,I just lowered your chain costs by a factor of 100!

Sounds like 3/32 is the 0.75% mark.
WizardOfBoz is offline  
Old 02-16-20, 10:20 AM
  #20  
WizardOfBoz
Generally bewildered
 
WizardOfBoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Eastern PA, USA
Posts: 2,792

Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane 6.9, 1999 LeMond Zurich, 1978 Schwinn Superior

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1040 Post(s)
Liked 243 Times in 180 Posts
BTW, the use of sand and water to create accelerated wear is consistent with other engineering testing methods. In testing plastic parts to failure, it is often the case that the part will last a really long time making the test impractical. What is done is to raise the temperature of the testing. Every 10C or so doubles the rate of many chemical and some physical processes. In any case, we can use "time-temperature superposition" to be able to test the part at high temperature in a reasonable amount of time to predict what will happen at lower service temperatures.

That said, the accelerated wear in this test may not be a practical indicator of chain life if folks use a different lubricant, and/or clean their chains often, and/or don't ride in dirty or gritty or wet conditions. I'm a fair-weather road bike rider. Rarely do I ride on dusty roads. We read above that folks get (sometimes) 1000s of hours of life from their chains, not 160. If I was a NYC courier riding in all conditions with lots of road grit, and didn't to the maintenance on my company bike, the test might be very applicable. For me, not so much.

Frictional differences between chains are pretty small - about 1-2 watts, according the test cited below. Still, Shimano and Campy seemed to be signficantly (0.5 to 2 W) lower in friction.

https://cyclingtips.com/2019/12/the-...ncy-comparison
WizardOfBoz is offline  
Old 02-16-20, 10:31 AM
  #21  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 8,490

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn, Lakitu

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4834 Post(s)
Liked 1,578 Times in 887 Posts
I too get around 4 chains per cassette. Fifteen chains would be over 45,000 miles per cassette, and simply does not seem like a thing that could ever happen... for me.

The Zinn test is nice in that it confirms my bias, I've been using nothing but PC-1110 and FSA Team Issue for the past ~2.5 years, and have never paid more than $17 per chain.

Getting 6,000-7,000 out of each chain pair, and using an a basic formula of (total annual miles / annual* chain cost) x (total annual miles / total annual hours) = somewhere around 10 per hour, using my cheapo chains.

*I just replace the chainsets annually, even if the wear is a little low. Spitting mileage between two bikes, I don't get near wearing all four chains out in a typical 10,000 mile year, but the chains are cheap.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 02-16-20, 10:58 AM
  #22  
aplcr0331
IMHOME
 
aplcr0331's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Inland Northwest
Posts: 569

Bikes: 2016 SuperSix Evo 105

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 221 Post(s)
Liked 74 Times in 46 Posts
I use the Dura Ace chains. Never measure, clean it about every 350-400 miles or so with a plastic thing that snaps on it, lube with Rock n Roll (I think) and then replace. I go about 2100-2300 miles per chain. Got about 4,500 miles out of my last cassette, just put it on the trainer since I got an 11/34 put on the bike theres some life left in the cassette Im sure.

Think I paid $32 for my last few DA chains. I love puting on a new chain. Just like I get new bar tape every year or even twice a year.

These tests are interesting and its cool to see how deep in the weeds people get into their chains.
aplcr0331 is offline  
Old 02-16-20, 11:00 AM
  #23  
Sy Reene
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 6,218

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3156 Post(s)
Liked 500 Times in 367 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post

The Zinn test is nice in that it confirms my bias, I've been using nothing but PC-1110 and FSA Team Issue for the past ~2.5 years, and have never paid more than $17 per chain.
It's great how we can each find a test that provides confirmation bias.. hence I'll continue with a Chorus chain.. though wish the Potenza level had been included in the test.

Sy Reene is offline  
Old 02-16-20, 11:23 AM
  #24  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 8,490

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn, Lakitu

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4834 Post(s)
Liked 1,578 Times in 887 Posts
Every single test done by Connex shows that the chains made by Connex last the absolute longest... but they're so expensive, only the boutique chains like the KMC Diamond Coat cost more-- so the cost per mile never works out in their favor.

Beyond that test, I've used 3 Connex chains-- two in 10-speed and one in 11-speed. They last the exact same amount of miles as the sub-$20 chains.

The hardcore, obsessed with marginal gains are gonna run pre-broken in UFO chains and never think about the cost. I'm sitting here tracking consumables down to the dime, trying to minimize the annual financial burden of a hobby.

The only thing we know for sure is that the 12-speed dudes are gonna be soaking up the "early adopter tax" for a while.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 02-16-20, 11:58 AM
  #25  
DaveSSS
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Loveland, CO
Posts: 5,960

Bikes: TWO Colnago C-RS w/Chorus 12

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 474 Post(s)
Liked 182 Times in 146 Posts
Originally Posted by San Rensho View Post
I don't understand the overthinking. If you have an 11 speed cassette, that means that you've spent a lot of money on your bike. And have a lot of money to spend. So just buy a chain measuring device, measure your chain regularly, and then buy the cheapest chain, which is probably a KMC which is a very good product and just replace it There was that that hard?
The cheapest chain to buy is not always the cheapest to own. The cheap KMC x11.93 that I used for one season, along with a couple of Campy Chorus chains proved that it would wear more than twice as fast as a Campy chain. The wear was also true elongation, measured over the full chain length, not some short measurement like a chain checker would do. Using the short length measuring method with digital calipers, the chain had the 132.6mm length where Campy recommends to toss a chain, after only 800-1000 miles of use. The 132.6mm is 1mm longer than a new chain. The Campy chains with the same mileage measured only 0.2mm longer.
DaveSSS is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.