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Sprung saddles are great

Old 04-13-20, 08:41 AM
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adlai
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Sprung saddles are great

I've tried out a few sprung saddles recently on my road bike. The saddle is typically situated a little above the handlebars and sloped downwards.
It's the best saddle experience I've ever had. Significantly reduced vibration, a lot more comfortable.

The springs don't make the ride floaty like a luxury car, they can't do that, but they do make the ride noticably softer.
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Old 04-13-20, 11:24 AM
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Adlai, please show us what saddles you've tried on your road bike.

I'm no roadie, but I do like thinly padded spring supported saddles/seats better than more softly padded rubber bushing mounted saddles.
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Old 04-13-20, 11:37 AM
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I’ve tried a couple that were pretty comfortable. And have one on a beach cruiser and another on an old English three speed.

It’s the weight penalty that keeps me from adopting them fully.
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Old 04-13-20, 10:20 PM
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Originally Posted by FiftySix View Post
Adlai, please show us what saddles you've tried on your road bike.

I'm no roadie, but I do like thinly padded spring supported saddles/seats better than more softly padded rubber bushing mounted saddles.
Brooks leather with a cutout. B17. Bought it from Amazon for $80.

Gyes leather. From eBay for $65.

Not sure which is better. Brooks slides around a lot more.
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Old 04-13-20, 11:36 PM
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Sprung saddles & suspension seat posts are the most efficient way to increase ride comfort. If logic ruled the bike market they would be common. Sprung leather is the most cost-effective but a Thudbuster seat post is adjustable & works with any saddle.
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Old 04-13-20, 11:45 PM
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Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
Sprung saddles & suspension seat posts are the most efficient way to increase ride comfort. If logic ruled the bike market they would be common.
I agree. I like sprung saddles.

In the old days they used to be common.
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Old 04-13-20, 11:59 PM
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Makes you really wonder. In the old days, they had steel frames, skinny seatposts, sprung saddles, box section rims and tubular tires.

We then made stiff frames, stiff seatposts, stiff saddles, stiff deep section rims and clincher tires that need to be pumped up to prevent pinch flats.

Did nobody notice the erosion of compliance over time? Or was that just considered secondary to weight and “performance”?

I ask this as someone new to biking who has a very uncomfortable bike. I think it’s funny how much extra engineering has to go in to match those old bikes in terms of comfort.
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Old 04-14-20, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by adlai View Post
Brooks leather with a cutout. B17. Bought it from Amazon for $80.

Gyes leather. From eBay for $65.

Not sure which is better. Brooks slides around a lot more.
I've never heard of Gyes before. The Brooks model that appeals to me is the B67, maybe I'll get one someday.
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Old 04-14-20, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by smashndash View Post
Makes you really wonder. In the old days, they had steel frames, skinny seatposts, sprung saddles, box section rims and tubular tires.

We then made stiff frames, stiff seatposts, stiff saddles, stiff deep section rims and clincher tires that need to be pumped up to prevent pinch flats.

Did nobody notice the erosion of compliance over time? Or was that just considered secondary to weight and “performance”?

I ask this as someone new to biking who has a very uncomfortable bike. I think it’s funny how much extra engineering has to go in to match those old bikes in terms of comfort.

Speed. It’s all about speed. Which is faster, Formula 1 car or a Cadillac? Which rides softer? But which one would you rather drive?
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Old 04-14-20, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by smashndash View Post
Makes you really wonder. In the old days, they had steel frames, skinny seatposts, sprung saddles, box section rims and tubular tires.

We then made stiff frames, stiff seatposts, stiff saddles, stiff deep section rims and clincher tires that need to be pumped up to prevent pinch flats.

Did nobody notice the erosion of compliance over time? Or was that just considered secondary to weight and “performance”?

I ask this as someone new to biking who has a very uncomfortable bike. I think it’s funny how much extra engineering has to go in to match those old bikes in terms of comfort.
And thus we learn that such things like bigger, lower pressure tires can have a better rolling resistance than hard thin tires except for on the smoothest newest surface. How long has it taken to figure that out and the industry is starting to catch on too.

I won't be surprised if it all comes full circle. What's old is new again.
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Old 04-14-20, 11:39 AM
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Originally Posted by adlai View Post
Brooks leather with a cutout. B17. Bought it from Amazon for $80.

Gyes leather. From eBay for $65.

Not sure which is better. Brooks slides around a lot more.
Yes, the B17 is a great, comfortable saddle, I use one, but it is not a sprung saddle. The Brooks Flyer is a sprung version of the B17.

These are the Flyer models. They are sprung.


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Old 04-14-20, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by AdkMtnMonster View Post
Speed. It’s all about speed. Which is faster, Formula 1 car or a Cadillac? Which rides softer? But which one would you rather drive?
You say that now. But bike manufacturers ran “lighter” into the ground in the late 1990s, early 2000s. Then they drove “stiffer” into the ground. Now they’re driving “aero” into the ground. Word around the block is that Specialized is gonna discontinue the venge because the tarmac will be aero enough.

Once they run out of reasons to sell you a new bike, some ground breaking research will come out measuring how important compliance/suspension is to speed over the course of multiple hours and then we’ll all be convinced that our stiff, light, aero bikes are worthless.
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Old 04-14-20, 03:05 PM
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...and steel is a better frame material than carbon fiber....

I'm pretty sure I wouldn't like a sprung saddle, because of the variable seat to pedal distance.

I, too, don't see the B-17 as 'sprung.' I do know that I found it more comfortable with the nose tilted slightly up than down. In fact, with the nose tilted down, i couldn't stay on the seat; I kept sliding forward. In the end, I couldn't keep from getting numb on my B17 Imperial, so I moved on.

Last edited by philbob57; 04-15-20 at 01:09 PM.
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Old 04-14-20, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by smashndash View Post
You say that now. But bike manufacturers ran “lighter” into the ground in the late 1990s, early 2000s. Then they drove “stiffer” into the ground. Now they’re driving “aero” into the ground. Word around the block is that Specialized is gonna discontinue the venge because the tarmac will be aero enough.

Once they run out of reasons to sell you a new bike, some ground breaking research will come out measuring how important compliance/suspension is to speed over the course of multiple hours and then we’ll all be convinced that our stiff, light, aero bikes are worthless.
It will still be all about speed, man. Speed! FasterFasterFaster!!!
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Old 04-14-20, 04:56 PM
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I put this seat post on my old Fuji when I got back in to riding after 20-odd years off... IIRC, I bought it from Nashbar in the late '80s/early '90s. It is a knee-joint kind of affair with a 1" diameter 1" high elastomer 'puck' that helps take the buzz out of rough pavement (like tar/stone chipseal)...




After ~20 years, the original had degraded and I had to replace the 'puck', so I sourced some new material thanks to the internet. minimum quantity was a foot - so I'm good for the rest of my life... and then some...

Has anybody else ever seen this sort of suspension seatpost ????
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Old 04-14-20, 07:54 PM
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I get these for around $10 to $15 each. Buy about three or four at a time. Can't remember how many times I've used them on builds. Best seat possible for general purpose riding.


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Old 04-15-20, 12:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Cougrrcj View Post
I put this seat post on my old Fuji when I got back in to riding after 20-odd years off... IIRC, I bought it from Nashbar in the late '80s/early '90s. It is a knee-joint kind of affair with a 1" diameter 1" high elastomer 'puck' that helps take the buzz out of rough pavement (like tar/stone chipseal)...




After ~20 years, the original had degraded and I had to replace the 'puck', so I sourced some new material thanks to the internet. minimum quantity was a foot - so I'm good for the rest of my life... and then some...

Has anybody else ever seen this sort of suspension seatpost ????
The specialized CG-R has effectively the same design.

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Old 04-15-20, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by smashndash View Post
Makes you really wonder. In the old days, they had steel frames, skinny seatposts, sprung saddles, box section rims and tubular tires.

We then made stiff frames, stiff seatposts, stiff saddles, stiff deep section rims and clincher tires that need to be pumped up to prevent pinch flats.

Did nobody notice the erosion of compliance over time? Or was that just considered secondary to weight and “performance”?

I ask this as someone new to biking who has a very uncomfortable bike. I think it’s funny how much extra engineering has to go in to match those old bikes in terms of comfort.
Oh yes, we noticed. And got called retrogrouch or worse because we noticed.

If a Flyer works for you, great. The trick is matching up spring rate, rider weight, road conditions, style of riding. When it all comes together enjoy. These days compliance comes almost entirely from tires, which usually works well enough. When all the other factors mentioned in your post come together it’s not just good enough, it’s great. Unfortunately all the pieces to make that happen are getting arcane. I ride a Bates. Look it up. Massive compliance, still stiff, light, precise steering. Race wins to prove it. What made that bike work will never be investigated.
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Old 04-15-20, 08:08 PM
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Originally Posted by smashndash View Post
Makes you really wonder. In the old days, they had steel frames, skinny seatposts, sprung saddles, box section rims and tubular tires.

We then made stiff frames, stiff seatposts, stiff saddles, stiff deep section rims and clincher tires that need to be pumped up to prevent pinch flats.

Did nobody notice the erosion of compliance over time? Or was that just considered secondary to weight and “performance”?

I ask this as someone new to biking who has a very uncomfortable bike. I think it’s funny how much extra engineering has to go in to match those old bikes in terms of comfort.
Old steel frames could be very comfortable but actually I think suspension forks & seat-posts can work better. Old-style long wheelbase bikes don't handle as well, at speed the front wheel can bounce a lot. Suspension fork adds weight but that can be negated with an aluminum frame instead of steel. Susp fork can be adjusted for rider weight & terrain whereas relying on frame for compliance is not adjustable. Yes it's extra engineering & cost but hardly exotic.
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