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Inexpensive Bike for Large Riders

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Inexpensive Bike for Large Riders

Old 04-28-20, 06:56 AM
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Ayb2k2
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Inexpensive Bike for Large Riders

Hi Guys,

I am 320 pounds and I want to start riding a bike again, but not wanting to pay over $300. I have done extensive research and the minimum I see is for $400. Do you have any bike recommendations for large riders for around $300. Please help!
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Old 04-28-20, 07:25 AM
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For heavier riders, bikes that are inexpensive to buy can become very expensive to own and ride due mostly to wheel and hub failures
It would also be useful to know what type of bike you are thinking of if you want recommendations

Last edited by alcjphil; 04-28-20 at 08:01 AM.
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Old 04-28-20, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
For heavier riders, bikes that are inexpensive to buy can become very expensive to own and ride due mostly to wheel and hub failures
It would also be useful to know what type of bike you are thinking of if you want recommendations
looking for a mountain bike
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Old 04-28-20, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Ayb2k2 View Post
Hi Guys,

I am 320 pounds and I want to start riding a bike again, but not wanting to pay over $300. I have done extensive research and the minimum I see is for $400. Do you have any bike recommendations for large riders for around $300. Please help!
Are you specifically looking for new or is used OK? Also how and where do you plan to ride? Gravel or crushed limestone trails? Single track? Pavement?
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Old 04-28-20, 09:06 AM
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Yes. First, how much you want to pay is irrelevant. How much you need to pay to get something that will suit you is the issue ... and at some point, you either pay or don't ride.

That accounts for the bargain-basement Big-box-store bikes .... you can get really cheap bikes which will last .... oh, maybe a month or more. However, they cannot be repaired for less than the cost of the bike---so you can buy a new $130-$250 bike every few months, or buy a decent bike, which will last you for the rest of your life. (I am myself a mega-clydesdale, so I am not just imagining all this.)

Unless you plan to ride off-road (I mean serious MTB trails, not packed-earth or packed gravel) I would advise against anything with suspension. it is impossible to find a durable suspension fork which could handle your weight for $300, let alone such a fork on a $300 bike.

I would suggest .... well there is a whole list of suggestions .... but to start,
Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
It would also be useful to know what type of bike you are thinking of if you want recommendations
This is not to say there are no big-box bikes which you could make work. You could get a rigid-frame flat-bar bike with a seven-speed freewheel (which is sadly, really weak) and so long as you were willing to take it in for maintenance ($50 bucks minimum, probably) after a few weeks, then another few weeks, then again after a couple months, and then pretty frequently , to keep the wheels tight and true ... and so long as you never hit a bump, because that would bend the rear axle .... for $150 up front and $250 in annual repair/,maintenance .... hmmm .... not such a great deal.

if you are just starting out as a cyclist I would probably recommend a flat-bar road bike for maximum comfort.

Thsi bike (https://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...r-hybrid-8.htm) is sort of what I would recommend---aluminum frame, steel fork, lots of spokes, 8-speed internally geared hub so very low maintenance, and room for tires up to 1.7 inches wide .... which increases comfort and gives you the capacity to ride on just about any level surface.

I assume you don't plan to be tackling gigantic hills or mountains right away, and the 8-speed hub ought to get you up most normal hills, unless you live in San Francisco or West Virginia or something. Otherwise, go for a 3x8, 24-speed version like this one (https://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...atbar-road.htm)

Please be aware that unless you buy a bike from a bike shop and negotiate for free tuneups, you Will have to go to a shop at least twice in the first few months, for a cable adjustment/spoke check after a few hundred miles, and maybe a second time just for a check after six or so months. All the maintenance you can learn online, and you can usually adjust a derailleur or brakes with one or two tools (a wrench, an allen wrench, a screw driver) and you can learn to tighten loose spokes too---a spoke wrench might cost $5.

These are just the cost of ownership---no matter whether you pay $100 or $10,000 for the bike. You will also want a spare tube, a portable pump, a floor pump and a patch kit.
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Old 04-28-20, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
Yes. First, how much you want to pay is irrelevant. How much you need to pay to get something that will suit you is the issue ... and at some point, you either pay or don't ride.

That accounts for the bargain-basement Big-box-store bikes .... you can get really cheap bikes which will last .... oh, maybe a month or more. However, they cannot be repaired for less than the cost of the bike---so you can buy a new $130-$250 bike every few months, or buy a decent bike, which will last you for the rest of your life. (I am myself a mega-clydesdale, so I am not just imagining all this.)

Unless you plan to ride off-road (I mean serious MTB trails, not packed-earth or packed gravel) I would advise against anything with suspension. it is impossible to find a durable suspension fork which could handle your weight for $300, let alone such a fork on a $300 bike.

I would suggest .... well there is a whole list of suggestions .... but to start,

This is not to say there are no big-box bikes which you could make work. You could get a rigid-frame flat-bar bike with a seven-speed freewheel (which is sadly, really weak) and so long as you were willing to take it in for maintenance ($50 bucks minimum, probably) after a few weeks, then another few weeks, then again after a couple months, and then pretty frequently , to keep the wheels tight and true ... and so long as you never hit a bump, because that would bend the rear axle .... for $150 up front and $250 in annual repair/,maintenance .... hmmm .... not such a great deal.

if you are just starting out as a cyclist I would probably recommend a flat-bar road bike for maximum comfort.

Thsi bike (https://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...r-hybrid-8.htm) is sort of what I would recommend---aluminum frame, steel fork, lots of spokes, 8-speed internally geared hub so very low maintenance, and room for tires up to 1.7 inches wide .... which increases comfort and gives you the capacity to ride on just about any level surface.

I assume you don't plan to be tackling gigantic hills or mountains right away, and the 8-speed hub ought to get you up most normal hills, unless you live in San Francisco or West Virginia or something. Otherwise, go for a 3x8, 24-speed version like this one (https://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...atbar-road.htm)

Please be aware that unless you buy a bike from a bike shop and negotiate for free tuneups, you Will have to go to a shop at least twice in the first few months, for a cable adjustment/spoke check after a few hundred miles, and maybe a second time just for a check after six or so months. All the maintenance you can learn online, and you can usually adjust a derailleur or brakes with one or two tools (a wrench, an allen wrench, a screw driver) and you can learn to tighten loose spokes too---a spoke wrench might cost $5.

These are just the cost of ownership---no matter whether you pay $100 or $10,000 for the bike. You will also want a spare tube, a portable pump, a floor pump and a patch kit.
We are really on the same page.
Every sport or activity has a cost of entry. And in cycling, most (but not all) is the bike, and maintenance cost, or sweat equity if you have the time to learn bike mechanics. This is true of anyone looking to start riding, but heavier riders have to budget a bit more, for wheels that can hold their weight. Because the sad truth is, while a stock wheel on a $500 bike might hold a 160 lb rider for light to average use, that is not necessarily true of a 300 pounder. As someone who weighs over 250, I have had issues with back wheels especially and it is no fun until you get things sorted out.

On mountain bikes and especially suspension forks. This is one of my pet peeves for not just heavier riders but all riders. Folks see two bikes. One looks pretty basic, solid fork. Costs about $600. Then they see a bike with a wide cushy seat, and a plush looking suspension fork. Cost. $400. And they go with the cheaper bike that looks more comfortable. Except that cheap suspension forks suck. I have ridden these bikes as rentals when on vacation and I can tell you, I am always happy to get home and back to my own bike after riding these comfort bikes with suspension forks. and if you really want good performance, a 300 pounder likely needs to budget as much for a suspension fork as they are prepared to spend on an entire bike. Simply put, unless OP needs to ride single track, suspension forks make little sense.
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Old 04-28-20, 09:35 AM
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I'm going to think outside the box and suggest for your consideration a beach cruiser. Built pretty tough and simple maintenance. Then if you get into cycling you can decide on a better quality bike of your choosing latter after you reach some of your goals
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Old 04-28-20, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by hillyman View Post
I'm going to think outside the box and suggest for your consideration a beach cruiser. Built pretty tough and simple maintenance. Then if you get into cycling you can decide on a better quality bike of your choosing latter after you reach some of your goals
I don't understand this whole 2 bike progression. My advise is to get something good enough the first time, rather than spending $300 now, so OP can spend $700 or $800 next year.

Unless OP is looking to cruise up and down the boardwalk, I would advise against the beach cruiser idea. IMO, a first bike should be enough bike to take OP from complete newbie to at least going on short day tours of 20, 30, even 40 miles. Not to say OP will do that, but should have a bike capable of carrying him that far. the Beach Cruiser, with its heavy weight, and single speed might be OK for a very short ride, but not much else.
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Old 04-28-20, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
I don't understand this whole 2 bike progression. My advise is to get something good enough the first time, rather than spending $300 now, so OP can spend $700 or $800 next year.

Unless OP is looking to cruise up and down the boardwalk, I would advise against the beach cruiser idea. IMO, a first bike should be enough bike to take OP from complete newbie to at least going on short day tours of 20, 30, even 40 miles. Not to say OP will do that, but should have a bike capable of carrying him that far. the Beach Cruiser, with its heavy weight, and single speed might be OK for a very short ride, but not much else.
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Old 04-28-20, 12:21 PM
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A few of thoughts ...

1) A used mountain bike may fit your budget and you.
2) In addition to the extra purchses mentioned above, I would strongly recommend a good helmet.
3) I recommend moving your query to the 'Clydesdales/Athenas' forum on this sight for counsel. You are not alone in being a large, beginning rider. Lots of people have ridden that rode, and lots of them post in the Clydesdale forum.

I hope you have a lot of fun cycling!
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Old 04-28-20, 03:48 PM
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Beach cruiser is a good idea, built like tanks but all cheap bikes will be relatively heavy anyway. Perfectly fine for running errands and cruising around
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Old 04-28-20, 06:36 PM
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I like what Hillyman said.
Look specifically for a FIVE SPEED Schwinn SUBURBAN from the SEVENTIES!!!
Why? INDESTRUCTIBLE and SUPER EASY FOR ANYONE TO SERVICE THE BOTTOM BRACKET BEARINGS, ADJUST REAR DERAILLEUR, CHANGE BRAKE PADS, CHANGE BRAKE CABLES(if necessary), CHANGE SHIFT CABLE(if necessary), GREASE THE HEADSET BEARINGS (everything is caged bearings including the bottom bracket (#64 bearing with nine in the cage......................)
You should be able to locate a FIVE SPEED Suburban for a cost of somewhere between $20 and $75 tops.
Why the FIVE SPEED? Because there is no front derailleur to worry about if bike was neglected and would require cables and re-adjustment.
Another reason is that the Japanese gearing (shimano Model J freewheel) and Shimano (schwinn approved GT-100 rear derailleur on 1970 thru 1973 and very early 1974 models..............schwinn approved GT-120 from early 1974 onwards) ----------has 32, 26, 21, 17, 14 at the REAR WHEEL and you've got the old clover style Schwinn single 46 teeth front crank wheel.
Even with just FIVE GEARS, you do get a very adequate gear range.
Why NOT an old Varsity or Continental? Because unless you're lucky enough to find one in perfectly functional condition, you will find that the Huret Allvit rear derailleur-schwinn approved version of that is a piece of dog dookie......................yeah you can easily replace it with a SUNTOUR or some SHIMANO unit but that is just one more thing.....ya remember Columbo.....just one more thing....
....ALSO being new to getting back on a bike after decades, you probably want to start with TOURIST style handlebars (more stable and more control for beginner) versus roadie drop bars or mountain bike style flat bars, so yes I do recommend the beach cruiser TOURIST style handlebars of the SUBURBAN (and the seventies era COLLEGIATE)
Why such an ancient and heavy $50 market value FIVE SPEED Suburban?? It is the Keith Richards of bicycles!
Very simple in the approach but delivers a great deal from such ultimate simplicity and then there is the unflappable reliability in all conditions which cannot be underestimated. The STEEL 27 inch wheels (32mm width - 630mm tire size, also known as 27 x 1 1/4 ) will withstand a very heavy rider as long as the spokes are not severely rusted. Yes, chromed steel wheels do not brake very well in wet conditions but in normal conditions with good new brake pads, braking is acceptable.
You're not going to be hauling azzz at 20mph or above unless you're riding downhill on such a Schwinn.
Everything is super-inexpensive and the one-piece ashtabula crank is so simple that a ten year old boy can learn to service the bottom bracket in 30 minutes with only a large crescent wrench, a flathead screwdriver, and a 15mm wrench to remove the left pedal, and whatever wrench & screwdriver etc to remove the chainguard.
No joke, it is super easy..........all that you have to do to begin is get the bike into 5th gear.....chain on the smallest rear sproket, and then gently with your left hand pivot the rear derailleur towards the front of the bike thus slackening the chain so that you can easily with your right hand pull the chain off of the 46tooth front crankwheel..
NEW TIRES are super inexpensive! BRAKE PADS are super inexpensive. The GRAY diacompe style 40mm pads with the acorn nut are decent and cost less than $5 for a new bag of four from many online bike parts sellers on the bay and elsewhere. The salmon colored Kool-Stop pads are about five times the cost, and are only necessary in my opinion if you're gonna be riding routinely in wet conditions or riding routinely at speeds above 17mph. Make certain when purchasing inexpensive brake pads that are BLACK in color because many are clearly marked as NOT FOR USE ON STEEL RIMS. The GRAY 40mm pads are good.
Adequate replacement Cable sets can be found at WALMART and online from ACE HARDWARE for $10 (the BELL pitcrew 600 cable set). These will require that you own or acquire a CABLE CUTTER that can cleanly and smoothly cut 5mm brake cables. Expect to spend a minimum of $16 for an adequate New steel bicycle-aircraft cable cutter from some sellers on the bay/web/amazon, though you may find that 12 inch cable cutters from Harbor Freight may work for around $10 to $12.
A dremel with a cutoff wheel will work perfect if you own one. Basic diagonal cutting pliers will not cut cleanly enough and you may damage/distort your NEW brake cable so badly that you'd need a new cable..
Lastly, there is no reason to fear doing your own Do-It-Yourself service work on a 1970's era Schwinn Suburban Five Speed. YOU CAN'T REALLY MESS IT UP BECAUSE IT IS SO SIMPLE! If you don't wish to remove the freewheel to re-lube that, just drip Automotive Motor oil into it via the wheel/bike on its side............any clean motor oil is fine.....15w-40, 20w-50, 10w-30, 5w-20, 30weight, IT DOES NOT REALLY MATTER as long as it is clean, so no need to use Mobil-1 unless you happen to have some left over...........the cheapest stuff will be fine, and if you have a mix of a small amount of new clean leftover motor oil from say two different weights or brands, it does not matter......................You simply want to try to get some to drip----seep into there for some fresh lubrication if you can.
You can take this same motor oil approach with the front wheel bearings.
YOU WILL WANT TO USE AUTOMOTIVE/MARINE Grease for the BOTTOM BRACKET's #64 nine caged bearing assembly and the headset's caged bearings.
The headset's caged bearings are not as critical as the bottom bracket if the bike appears clean and without rust and exposure to rain and the elements.
Many folks go decades without worrying about the grease in the headset because if adequate it can with the right storage/bicycle use conditions can go without servicing for a very long time on Vintage Schwinns and other makes.
I'm certainly not saying that a vintage SCHWINN SUBURBAN FIVE SPEED is the only bicycle you'd want for the rest of your life, but for starters it is a super durable, inexpensive, stable, smooth riding, predictable handling, easy to do it yourself servicing bicycle that is built so solidly that I believe it can accomodate someone that weighs 400 pounds or more. Should the rider weigh more than 350 pounds, they should look for the frame size that is adequately sized that they do not need to raise the seat post more than 2 inches or less. You'll find that the sizing of such vintage electroforged Schwinn frames are such that many have long (essentially the same) top tube lengths that allow many of the various sized frames(measured by seatube height from center of bb to seat post clamp)......allowing these different size frames to fit many many riders by simply raising and lowering the seatpost(...within reason!...) but this is not recommended for very heavy folks(over 350 pounds) because then the weakest component then becomes the Seatpost and the stress and lever effect that exposing more seatpost may or may not be able to handle a really heavy rider depending on the riding conditions and road shocks etc----------------------seat post becomes the weak link and the more of it that is exposed could cause a potential hazard to someone very heavy under unforeseen riding conditions------------------------you don't want to risk it and possibly have a seat post torque and snap......................this would not occur if the seat tube (frame size is large enough) does not require much raising of the seat post. For this same reason, I WOULD NOT RECOMMEND using LAYBACK seatposts for the same reasons. They are fine for non-Clydesdales&Athenas but Clydes/Athenas need the strength of the proper size range frame rather than something that isn't as structurally strong but is a workaround which is adequate for some lighter folks.
I highly recommend that you do not spend very much in acquiring a Schwinn Suburban five speed! I highly recommend that you do not spend very much on getting it street-worthy. There is no point in attempting to UPGRADE such a bicycle. The One-Piece Crank is fantastically durable and unbreakable. The Steel Wheels are heavy, yes, like the one piece crank, but they are functional for a heavy weight rider even though braking in the rain or wet with steel wheels is a serious challenge.
Yes, you'll hear folks saying that heck no, I wouldn't even consider riding any 40 pound gas-pipe boat anchor that is slower than Christmas. It is a good basic "cruiser" type bicycle that has adequate gearing that will allow you to climb hills and move fast enough for fast cruising. The brakes are good enough for the speeds (7mph to 18mph) that you'll be riding. The bike is durable, comfortable, and you can find them for $40 to $50. Two Tires and two tubes can be obtained for $40 or slightly less. Brake pads will cost $5 for a set of four. Cable set from Walmart $10 and 9% sales tax = $10.90 (if you'd need new cables) and say $16 for a steel cable cutter, and maybe $10 for Automotive/Marine grease (enough for fifty or more bicycles...or lifetime supply for most people)........Large Crescent Wrench from Harbor Freight for about $12.....
you likely already have flathead screwdriver and related wrenches, channel lock pliers and left over motor oil.
Youtube has videos showing you how to.
If you feel like you'd want a new chain, get your bike streetworthy, then go to your local bike shop......Outspokin locally here charges me $18 total incuding labor and state sales tax to remove the old chain and install a brand new chain on my Five Speed COLLEGIATES and Five Speed SUBURBANS...............that is money well spent....yes I could just buy the chain itself over the counter and install it myself but their labor cost is only about the cost of the chain and the quality and fit and the integrity of the linking of the chain is expertly done by them and well worth it in my opinion!
One important consideration: pay close attention to video or other book instruction on how to get the brakes and brake pads properly adjusted..........take it very slowly on initial test ride UNTIL YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY SURE THAT YOU HAVE GOT IT DONE PROPERLY because you don't want to get hurt!!
As mentioned briefly, the FIVE SPEED SCHWINN COLLEGIATE (the 1970-1978 versions are.......the 1964-1969 Collegiate versions are junkier, thus are not) the five speed Collegiates from 1970 onwards are THE SAME QUALITY as SUBURBANS. Same Shimano rear derailleurs (GT-100 or GT-120 depending on year) and same Model J freewheel with the 32 to 14 gear cogs and the single 46 teeth front crankwheel. THE DIFFERENCE IS THAT THE COLLEGIATE HAS 26 inch (35mm -597mm) wheels. It makes it such that only KENDA makes this 597mm 26 X 1 3/8 schwinn tire...... These tires are approx $19 each. Thus these 597mm Kenda tires are more expensive than the selection of basic 27 inch 630mm tires that the SUBURBAN requires.
The Collegiate (1970 model year and later) is superb and supremely durable like the SUBURBAN. The 1964-1969 Collegiate is not nearly as good!
The main thing to remember is that these are great basic bicycles. You should not try to significantly upgrade these as your improvements will be minimal at best given the slow speed nature and ride characteristics of these bicycles. If you want something significantly lighter and faster, than you'd want to focus on another bicycle which is significantly lighter and already has durable components that are light enough and well built (e.g. PANASONIC or FUJI... 1978 - 1986 era.) but I am not certain that those lightweights can handle really heavy Athenas/Clydes. They (PANASONICS and FUJIS) are certainly great bikes across all price points during that era but lightweight bicycles such as those weren't made for folks that are the size of American football linemen. The Schwinn electroforged frames on the other hand are far stronger even than they ever needed to be, and that is perhaps the one thing that is significant in this case, and though folks will say heavy gas-pipe and two ton Schwinn but the positive byproduct of this is that today's larger average Americans can easily not have to worry about such a vintage electroforged Schwinn carrying that much of a load. You can do a lot worse than a vintage five speed Schwinn Suburban to get started off with. It will be much harder to find anything simpler and more durable in any price range. The five speed SUBURBAN is among the least expensive bicycles to obtain and it is also probably the least expensive to DIY repair. That and that it can accomodate anyone. It is certainly not a bad starting off bicycle. Ride it until such time when you decide to and can afford to get a new bicycle that has everything that ticks all the boxes of what you'd want in a new bicycle......................until then just get out, get some sunshine, and fresh air and pedal your way into having fun in the sun.......... you aren't gonna be doing any triathlons or racing in the tour de france at least until we're out of this social distancing, covid-19 corona virus height of the pandemic. There are probably dozens of these ancient Suburbans just sitting in garages, sheds and basements of older baby boomers in your city. Search and you'll find a decent enough example to start riding. You don't need to start out riding the drops on a road bike that weighs 18 pounds or less. You just need to get out on a bicycle and re-familiarize yourself with the fun of just riding a bike and then just take it from there and decide what you really would like. You do absolutely want to buy a brand new helmet that fits your head and wear it everytime you get on the bike. Walmart and Target both sell excellent helmets for a good price. All new helmets do meet minimum standards which exceed the standards of helmets of the eighties and nineties.
Get going! Have fun! Wear a helmet!
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Old 04-28-20, 07:33 PM
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Old 04-28-20, 07:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Ayb2k2 View Post
Hi Guys,

I am 320 pounds and I want to start riding a bike again, but not wanting to pay over $300. I have done extensive research and the minimum I see is for $400. Do you have any bike recommendations for large riders for around $300. Please help!
Be sure to check out this site's "Clydesdale/Athena" for advice for and from larger riders.
https://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdal...-200-lb-91-kg/
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Old 04-28-20, 07:55 PM
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from the 90's, used trek 850, 720, or 950. It will say single track or mountain track, or something track. They run a tad small so look for an appropriate size for you. For example, I usually use a bike that measures 19 inches from top of the seat tube to the center of the crank, but on my 850 it's 21 inches but fits perfectly (am 5'10")

pair these with some heavy duty tires and your off
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Old 04-28-20, 07:56 PM
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craigslist and ebay
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Old 04-28-20, 08:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Flip Flop Rider View Post
from the 90's, used trek 850, 720, or 950. It will say single track or mountain track, or something track. They run a tad small so look for an appropriate size for you. For example, I usually use a bike that measures 19 inches from top of the seat tube to the center of the crank, but on my 850 it's 21 inches but fits perfectly (am 5'10")

pair these with some heavy duty tires and your off
Plus one!
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Old 04-28-20, 08:13 PM
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https://boone.craigslist.org/bik/d/b...113809416.html

something like this
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Old 04-28-20, 08:17 PM
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Look for a touring rig with a minimum of 36 spoke count on the wheels. Or else, something like this old battleship with 42 spokes on the rear wheel & heavy duty tires.................................

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Old 04-28-20, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
I don't understand this whole 2 bike progression. My advise is to get something good enough the first time, rather than spending $300 now, so OP can spend $700 or $800 next year.

Unless OP is looking to cruise up and down the boardwalk, I would advise against the beach cruiser idea. IMO, a first bike should be enough bike to take OP from complete newbie to at least going on short day tours of 20, 30, even 40 miles. Not to say OP will do that, but should have a bike capable of carrying him that far. the Beach Cruiser, with its heavy weight, and single speed might be OK for a very short ride, but not much else.
Sorry cranky moment for me as usual.
Normally I'd agree with you 100%. But OP is a little bit different circumstances. Says $300 budget so my thinking is getting em comfortable and looking cool on a beach cruiser and hopefully will stick with riding. That's the critical period in getting into or back into riding. May be awhile for OP on longer rides, just up to their own motivation
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Old 04-28-20, 10:58 PM
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If the OP can find a single-speed beach cruiser for $100 or so, even a big-box model, that would be fine. There is so little to the bike there is almost nothing to break or bend , no matter how cheap the parts.

I wouldn't suggest anything used .... the gyu seems not to know anything about bikes, and buying used, getting something which needs a lot of work and hard-to-find parts .... what a downer.

Normally I would not suggest a cheap beach cruiser ... but I think the main thing here is getting the guy on a bike, on the road, so he can see how much fun it is.

Just an opinion.
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Old 04-29-20, 02:44 AM
  #22  
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Beach cruiser and used mountain bike are good choices.
also consider a worksman industrial bike, new $ may be a little over OP's point ?
prior to pandemic, at this time of year- bike shops would be doing bike swaps,
often could pick up a nice bike for good price.
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Old 04-29-20, 05:15 AM
  #23  
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It seems some people who are not so heavy, seem to think someone who is a bit heavier will break a bike quite quickly.

He is probably not going to do a lot of miles compared with the fit riders. I don't expect him to be going off jumps, or anything which would break the bike quickly. If he bought any reasonable mountain bike, it would probably last a long time. The weakest link is most likely the spokes in the back wheel, and they should last many months.

To the op, I suggest buy any decent mountain bike that is at a good price.

In many months time, you may find broken spokes in the back wheel. It is ideal to look for a bike with strong wheels, or where it is easy to find a suitable replacement back wheel. If you are mechanically minded, when they do break, you may buy the tools, and stronger spokes, then replace them yourself.

It is better to get on with exercising, and hopefully lose some weight, than to give up because you can't find the perfect bike.
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Old 04-29-20, 10:52 AM
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Thanks!
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Old 04-29-20, 12:50 PM
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I got up to 312 a while ago due to thyroid issues. The riding did basically nothing for weight loss just so you know, and not much for blood pressure, but it did help my cardio abilities get better more like when I was 20.

The weak spot is the wheels and most bikes have terrible wheels anyway, so unless you spend a large amount there is no difference in what you get. At 400 lbs you would probably need special wheels but at 320 if you get an old mountain bike with 26 inch wheels and 1.95-2.1 range tires then you should be fine so long as you are careful about not jumping off curves. Now I have lost over 80 pounds but I did not really lose weight or get my blood pressure finally under control until I started fasting. That also improved my thyroid and a lot of other issues.
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